Expat lists the ‘bizarre’ things he NEVER heard before moving to Australia from America

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From Blu-tack to the phrase ‘can’t be bothered’: Expat lists the ‘bizarre’ things he’d never heard of before moving to Australia from America

  • An American expat has listed Australian terms that he has never heard of
  • Adam Foskey shared a short video with his 20,000 TikTok followers
  • He’s ‘never heard’ of Blu Tack, doonas, ‘servos’ and the term ‘can’t be bothered’

An American expat made a list of the things he had never heard of before moving to Australia.

In a TikTok video Adam Foskey said he has ‘never heard’ of Blu Tack, doonas, ‘servos’ and the phrase ‘can’t be bothered’.

The clip is part of a series of similar videos that Mr. Foskey has shared with his online followers of more than 20,000 people.

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The clip is part of a series of similar videos that Mr. Foskey has shared with his online followers of more than 20,000 people

In a TikTok video that recently went viral, Adam Foskey said he had ‘never’ heard of Blu Tack, doonas, ‘servos’ and the phrase ‘can’t be bothered’.

At first, he admitted he was unaware of the Blu Tack – a putty-like glue that can be used to attach photos, posters, and paper to walls and surfaces.

The removable product can be reused several times without leaving any residue.

Then he explained how Australians use the term ‘can’t be bothered’ when ‘they don’t feel like doing anything’.

As Australians tend to shorten words, Mr Foskey said he has never heard of the term ‘servo’, which refers to a gas station.

“I would call it a gas station, but servo is short, sweet and easier to say,” he said.

“Finally, we have a doona, which I would call a duvet cover, but it’s just something to keep you warm on those cold winter nights,” he said.

I would call it a gas station, but servo is short, punchy, and easier to pronounce.

Earlier this week, he shared another video that he said was unfamiliar with the concept of tasting until moving from his native Georgia.

Tasting menus, also known as tasting menus, see diners served multiple small portions of the chef’s signature dishes at once – a trend Mr. Foskey calls “ great. ”

He said he was also surprised by how Australians sing ‘happy birthday’, noting that Aussies often end the party song by singing ‘hip hip hooray’ which Americans never do.

Tourists share the greatest culture shocks in Australia

WEATHER: The sun in Australia is strong. I did not respect this at all when I arrived. I failed to buy decent sunscreen and paid the price with bad sunscreen. My skin was peeling and peeling off for weeks afterwards. The sun is deadly in Australia, take precautions or you will be redder than a lobster!

AUSTRALIANS SWEAR A LOT: I only realized this when I went to the house where the girl I saw then lived. Two of her roommates were Australian and weren’t afraid to blurt out expletives at every opportunity. I especially noticed the use of one word. They would call me a good c ** t. I would never think of using this word in England. Doesn’t matter, as a form of praise to someone.

BEER SIZES: When you ask for a beer in England, you get a pint. In Australia you don’t get a pint, but a schooner, that’s 3/4 pint. Then if you’re in a state like Victoria you might get a jar, which is about half a pint. The worst of this? The smaller sizes cost more than a pint in England.

MAGPIES: I was attacked by a magpie in the first month in Australia, I had no idea you could be attacked by a bird in the street.

COFFEE: Coffee in Australia is so much better than all the trash they drink in America that it’s almost sad.

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