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Exercise can help keep the brain sharp in old age, research suggests (stock)

Only a single 20-minute exercise can help keep the brain sharp in old age, research suggests.

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Scientists from the University of Iowa analyzed 34 people, aged 60 to 80, who were riding an exercise bike for the short amount.

After a single training, brain scans showed an outburst of activity in the participants' hippocampus, which acts as the & # 39; memory center & # 39 ;.

They also had an increased connectivity between the hippocampus and the parietal and prefrontal cortexes, regions that are involved in both memory and cognition.

& # 39; Daily & # 39; activities can be all that is needed to reap the benefits, with the researchers emphasizing that people should not feel that they need to train for a marathon & # 39; to keep their memory sharp.

Exercise can help keep the brain sharp in old age, research suggests (stock)

Exercise can help keep the brain sharp in old age, research suggests (stock)

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& # 39; An implication of this study is that you could think of the benefits every day, & # 39; said lead author Dr. Michelle Voss.

"In terms of behavioral change and cognitive benefits of physical activity, you can say," I'm just going to be active today. I get an advantage ".

& # 39; So you don't have to think like you're going to train for a marathon to get some sort of optimum peak in performance.

& # 39; You can simply work on it every day to achieve those benefits. & # 39;

HOW MANY EXERCISE SHOULD YOU DO?

To stay healthy, adults from 19 to 64 must try to be active on a daily basis and must do the following:

  • at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity such as cycling or brisk walking every week and
  • strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms)

Or:

  • 75 minutes of powerful aerobic activity such as running or a game of tennis every week and
  • strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms)

Or:

  • a mix of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity every week – for example 2 x 30 minutes of running plus 30 minutes of brisk walking equals 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity and
  • strength exercises on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms)
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A good rule is that 1 minute vigorous activity offers the same health benefits as 2 minute moderate activity.

One way to do your recommended 150 minute weekly physical activity is to do 30 minutes on 5 days each week.

All adults must also sit for long periods with mild activity ending.

Source: NHS

Exercise is linked to everything from improved heart health and bone strength to a reduced risk of depression and even cancer.

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However, little research has been done on how a single attack of physical activity affects cognition and memory, especially in older people.

To find out more, the researchers analyzed 34 older people who were healthy but did not exercise often.

The participants rode 20 minutes twice a time on an exercise bike.

During the first session the bike had a slight resistance, which became too heavy the second time.

The participants underwent brain scans before and after each training.

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They have also completed a memory test. This meant that they were shown a set of eight faces that rotated every three seconds, such as a flash card.

Participants had to decide whether a face they would have two & # 39; cards & # 39; previously matched the face they were looking at.

Results – published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise – revealed that after both bike rides some participants had outbursts of activity, as well as increased connectivity, in their hippocampus.

The same individuals also performed better on the memory tests after training.

However, the improvements did not last.

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& # 39; The hope is that many people will then sustain it, because those benefits for the brain are temporary, & # 39; said Dr. Voss.

In a second part of the experiment, the participants cycled three times a week for 50 minutes on an exercise bike for three months.

One group had moderate to intense resistance, while the other group trained lighter.

The results showed that most participants in both groups experienced improvements in their brain scans and memory tests after they had completed the training schedule.

However, the improvements were no better than after a single 20-minute session on an exercise bike.

& # 39; The result that a single session of aerobic exercises mimics the effects of 12 weeks of training on performance has important practical and theoretical implications, & # 39 ;, the researchers wrote.

However, they emphasize that the study was small and only included healthy people.

That's why they repeat the experiment in five years, but the participants are still healthy, older people who are inactive.

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