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Former Marine and Aspiring Border Guard Joshua Pratchard, 38, received a 75-month prison sentence on Tuesday for arms charges

A former Marine who was ejected from an armed civilian border patrol group on anger issues and eager to pursue migrants on the US-Mexico border has been sentenced to more than six years for the production of weapons and ammunition at his home in San Diego.

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Joshua Pratchard, 38, received a 75-month term of office in the federal prison in the US court in Tucson on Tuesday.

Prosecutors said that Pratchard had left California in January 2018 to work with an armed group patrolling the border at Arivaca, Arizona, for illegal border crossings.

Former Marine and Aspiring Border Guard Joshua Pratchard, 38, received a 75-month prison sentence on Tuesday for arms charges

Former Marine and Aspiring Border Guard Joshua Pratchard, 38, received a 75-month prison sentence on Tuesday for arms charges

Prosecutors say that Pratchard, who was a convicted criminal, had an armory in his home in San Diego, full of equipment to make weapons and enough gunpowder to make 9,000 rounds of ammunition

Prosecutors say that Pratchard, who was a convicted criminal, had an armory in his home in San Diego, full of equipment to make weapons and enough gunpowder to make 9,000 rounds of ammunition

Prosecutors say that Pratchard, who was a convicted criminal, had an armory in his home in San Diego, full of equipment to make weapons and enough gunpowder to make 9,000 rounds of ammunition

Officers grabbed eight guns from Pratchard's house, four of which he had built himself
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Officers grabbed eight guns from Pratchard's house, four of which he had built himself

Officers grabbed eight guns from Pratchard's house, four of which he had built himself

Prosecutors said that the former Marine was a & # 39; firearm and ammunition factory & # 39; in his home, which he bragged to an FBI informant he met last year at the Arizona Border Recon patrol group

Prosecutors said that the former Marine was a & # 39; firearm and ammunition factory & # 39; in his home, which he bragged to an FBI informant he met last year at the Arizona Border Recon patrol group

Prosecutors said that the former Marine was a & # 39; firearm and ammunition factory & # 39; in his home, which he bragged to an FBI informant he met last year at the Arizona Border Recon patrol group

He was asked to leave Arizona Border Recon after just a few days because he reportedly wanted to physically hold migrants in a way he described as & # 39; hands-on & # 39 ;, drug traffickers commonly known as & # 39; rip crews & # 39; and use a silencer on his weapon, reported Arizona Daily Star.

When the leader of the group, Tim Foley, said he could not involve migrants in this way, Pratchard & # 39; visibly became angry & # 39; attracted the attention of an FBI informant present at that meeting, according to court reports.

The informant became friends with the dissatisfied would-be vigilante and the two went on various exploratory missions along the border in the spring of 2018 after Pratchard was ejected from Foley & # 39; s group for bringing a gun equipped with a silencer.

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Foley previously denied that his group is a & # 39; militia & # 39; was and insisted that his actions were lawful.

During one of Pratchard and the informant's independent patrols, the former navy would boast that he had set up an armory at home where he had built firearms for friends and family.

Pratchard told the court on Tuesday that he had become obsessed with making weapons and ammunition (proof photo)

Pratchard told the court on Tuesday that he had become obsessed with making weapons and ammunition (proof photo)

Pratchard told the court on Tuesday that he had become obsessed with making weapons and ammunition (proof photo)

He even engraved his homemade pistols with fake serial numbers consisting of the birth dates of his wife and toddler son

He even engraved his homemade pistols with fake serial numbers consisting of the birth dates of his wife and toddler son

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He even engraved his homemade pistols with fake serial numbers consisting of the birth dates of his wife and toddler son

Pratchard's past criminal record included two felony convictions for selling ecstasy pills and brutally beating a man, preventing him from possessing weapons. That is why he decided to make his own weapons and the informant said: & # 39; They just become addictive and you can't stop. & # 39;

He even engraved his homemade pistols with fake serial numbers consisting of the birth dates of his wife and toddler son, according to the prosecution.

Pratchard was arrested outside the Casino Del Sol in Tucson in June 2018 with a .45-caliber pistol, a short-barreled rifle, another rifle and 300 rounds of ammunition in his truck.

When federal agents invaded his home in San Diego, they discovered what prosecutors described as a & # 39; firearm and ammunition factory & # 39; packed with eight guns – four of them registered with the man's wife – equipment used to build firearms and enough gunpowder to make 9,000 bullets, reported The Washington Post.

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In February, Pratchard pleaded guilty to 13 counts, including the possession of a firearm by a criminal, the unauthorized transfer of a firearm and the possession of an unregistered firearm.

His defense argued that the former Navy had struggled most of his life with untreated mental illness and suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder. Since his arrest, he has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

As a convicted criminal, Pratchard was not allowed to possess firearms, including this one

As a convicted criminal, Pratchard was not allowed to possess firearms, including this one

As a convicted criminal, Pratchard was not allowed to possess firearms, including this one

Federal prosecutors detailed what they described as the & # 39; long history of violence and unresolved anger of the defendant & # 39 ;.

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He went to the Marine Corps as a teenager, but was fired less than three years later after being convicted of selling ecstasy pills.

In 2007, he was arrested for stamping on a man's head during a fight in the pub, which resulted in a conviction of a crime attack.

In 2014, Pratchard's wife called the police on him and claimed that he had verbally threatened to injure her and then threw her to bed. The woman finally chose not to report her husband and the case was rejected.

When he was given the opportunity to speak at his hearing on Tuesday, Pratchard admitted that he had made & # 39; a really stupid decision & # 39 ;.

The prospective border guard explained that he had become so involved in the manufacture of his own weapons that the pursuit of his & # 39; idol & # 39; became.

& # 39; I don't want anything to do with weapons anymore, & # 39; he said. & # 39; They are the curse of my existence. & # 39;

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