Ex-FBI agent cheats on $800k woman with ‘secret probation’

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Ex-FBI agent, 62, faces charges after he “swindled a Texas woman $800k by convincing her she was on secret probation for drug offenses and used the money to buy a house, Mercedes and pickup truck.” to buy’

  • William Roy Stone, Jr., 62, is accused of using the money he swindled from the woman to buy a house in Dallas, as well as a Mercedes and a pickup truck
  • Prosecutors say Stone began defrauding the woman after he retired from the FBI’s Dallas office in October 2015.
  • He convinced the woman that an Austin judge had placed her under “secret probation” for drug offenses and that he had been appointed to supervise her.
  • Stone allegedly told the woman that the terms of her probation meant she had to pay his expenses while she supervised her
  • At one point, Stone is said to have told the woman that her probation would be lifted if she married him
  • It is not clear whether Stone had a sexual relationship with the woman at the time

A retired FBI agent has been charged after allegedly defrauding a Texas woman of $800,000 by convincing her for years that she was on “secret probation” for drug crimes.

William Roy Stone, Jr., 62, is accused of using the money he conned from the woman to buy a house in Dallas, as well as a Mercedes and a pickup truck.

Stone pleaded not guilty in Dallas last week to 11 federal counts, including wire fraud, conspiracy and impersonating a federal officer over the alleged fraud scheme.

Prosecutors say Stone retired from the FBI’s Dallas office in October 2015, and the following month convinced the woman that an Austin judge had placed her under “secret probation” for drug offenses.

Retired FBI agent William Roy Stone, Jr., 62, has been charged after allegedly defrauding a Texas woman of $800,000 by convincing her for years that she was on 'secret probation' for drug offenses

Retired FBI agent William Roy Stone, Jr., 62, has been charged after allegedly defrauding a Texas woman of $800,000 by convincing her for years that she was on ‘secret probation’ for drug offenses

The woman is only identified as CT in court records.

He allegedly told the woman that he was still a cop, that the fictitious judge had appointed him as a ‘mentor’ and ‘supervising’ her.

Stone told the woman that the terms of her probation included giving him a list of her belongings and paying his expenses while she supervised her, according to the indictment.

Stone allegedly told the woman she was prohibited from telling anyone about her probation and risked jail time and loss of custody of her children if she did.

Over the next four years, Stone reportedly forced the woman to give him hundreds of thousands of dollars.

He used the money to buy a Toyota pickup truck, a Mercedes sedan and real estate in a northwest Dallas suburb, prosecutors say.

At one point, Stone is said to have told the woman that her probation would be lifted if she married him.

Stone used the money to buy a Toyota pickup truck, a Mercedes sedan and real estate in a northwest Dallas suburb (pictured above), prosecutors say

Stone used the money to buy a Toyota pickup truck, a Mercedes sedan and real estate in a northwest Dallas suburb (pictured above), prosecutors say

Prosecutors say Stone began defrauding the woman after he retired from the FBI's Dallas office in October 2015 (above).  The FBI declined to comment on Stone's tenure as an agent

Prosecutors say Stone began defrauding the woman after he retired from the FBI’s Dallas office in October 2015 (above). The FBI declined to comment on Stone’s tenure as an agent

The FBI declined to answer questions about Stone’s tenure as an agent, whether he had met the woman through his work for the agency, and whether they were in a relationship.

Stone’s lawyer also declined to say whether his client was in a romantic or sexual relationship with the woman he allegedly cheated on.

Prosecutors say the woman gave Stone about $800,000 over several years.

“Stone allegedly defrauded, threatened and stole his victim, misusing her trust in law enforcement for his own financial gain,” said Cloey C. Pierce, a Justice Department special agent at the Inspector General’s Dallas Field Office.

Stone’s attorney, Gregg Gallian, said his client has pleaded not guilty and denies the charges against him.

Gallian said he “looks forward to bringing the truth of these misleading allegations to court in court.”

If convicted, Stone faces up to 178 years in prison.

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