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Ed Dohring, from Arizona, fulfilled a lifelong ambition to reach the world's highest peak, at 29,029 feet, but that dream became almost sour when he witnessed the path to the top full of people who & # 39; not fit and not experienced & # 39; are pushing and pushing to take selfies

The dangers of overcrowding at the Everest summit have been uncovered by a doctor who described having to walk around a dead woman to reach the summit and sit down at the overflow peak to prevent him falling thousands of feet before his death.

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Ed Dohring, from Arizona, fulfilled a lifelong ambition to reach the highest peak in the world, at 29,029 feet, but that dream became almost sour when he witnessed the crowded path to the top full of people who & # 39; fit and not experienced & # 39; were and push to take selfies.

Dohring, 62, who had waited for hours in line, chest to chest with other climbers, said he was forced to sit down when he finally reached the top because the flat part of the top is only about the size of two Ping Pong tables, but was packed with 15 or 20 people who pushed to take pictures alongside a drop of several thousand feet.

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Ed Dohring, from Arizona, fulfilled a lifelong ambition to reach the world's highest peak, at 29,029 feet, but that dream became almost sour when he witnessed the path to the top full of people who & # 39; not fit and not experienced & # 39; are pushing and pushing to take selfies

Ed Dohring, from Arizona, fulfilled a lifelong ambition to reach the world's highest peak, at 29,029 feet, but that dream became almost sour when he witnessed the path to the top full of people who & # 39; not fit and not experienced & # 39; are pushing and pushing to take selfies

& # 39; It was scary & # 39 ;, he said to the New York Times. & # 39; It looked like a zoo & # 39 ;, said the doctor, who was on the same expedition as Christopher Kulish, who on Monday became the tenth person to die in ten days.

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This year was the most deadly for climbers on Mount Everest since 2012, when 10 climbers died. All 11 deaths in 2019 occurred during the peak climbing season.

Dohring described the witnessing of a large group that was already at the top, some of whom & # 39; very rude and unruly & # 39; and & # 39; basically pushed so that they could take better photos of themselves & # 39 ;.

It was then that the experienced climber decided & # 39; this is not safe & # 39; and he sat down to take his festive photo, knowing that it would be less likely that he would be beaten out of balance and throw himself into his death.

& # 39; I was surprised how many people, more than 26,000 feet, were really not fit or were not experienced and probably should not have been & # 39 ;, Dohring said. CBS, adding that Kulish was not one of these inexperienced climbers.

Dohring, 62, (pictured in his Nepal hotel room after the top) who had waited for hours in line, chest to chest with other climbers, said he was forced to sit down as soon as he finally reached the peak because the flat part of the top is only about the size of two Ping-Pong tables, but was full of 15 or 20 people pushing to take photos alongside a drop of several thousand feet

Dohring, 62, (pictured in his Nepal hotel room after the top) who had waited for hours in line, chest to chest with other climbers, said he was forced to sit down as soon as he finally reached the peak because the flat part of the top is only about the size of two Ping-Pong tables, but was full of 15 or 20 people pushing to take photos alongside a drop of several thousand feet

Dohring, 62, (pictured in his Nepal hotel room after the top) who had waited for hours in line, chest to chest with other climbers, said he was forced to sit down as soon as he finally reached the peak because the flat part of the top is only about the size of two Ping-Pong tables, but was full of 15 or 20 people pushing to take photos alongside a drop of several thousand feet

& # 39; I was certainly not willing to cross dead bodies attached to the safety line. It was very difficult. & # 39;

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Officials have issued 367 permits to foreigners and another 14 to Nepalese mountaineers to climb Everest this year, according to a government liaison officer in the base camp.

The increase is due to growing dissatisfaction among the climbing community that adventurous companies that fly fly offer cheaper packages to unsuitable climbers, hiding the summit and endangering other mountain climbers.

Guides operating on the Nepalese side of the mountain are now switching to the Tibetan side because they fear that more will die.

& # 39; This is not going to improve. There is a lot of corruption in the Nepalese government, & # 39; said Lukas Furtenbach, such a guide. & # 39; They take what they can get. & # 39;

The Nepalese government has denied that it is the fault and instead says that there have not been enough good weather days this year.

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& # 39; If you really want to limit the number of climbers, let's end all expeditions on our holy mountain, & # 39; said Danduraj Ghimire, the director general of the Nepalese tourism ministry.

Others have told how ruthless and & # 39; obsessed & # 39; climbers get to the top by ignoring people who might be struggling.

& # 39; I asked the people for water and nobody gave me one. People are really obsessed with the top. They are ready to kill themselves for the top, & # 18; said 18-year-old Rizza Alee from Kashmir.

Recordings made by the young climber show the extraordinary line of people waiting to climb the mountain to hit their toes to the top before climbing ladders to reach the flattened summit.

Another woman said that as she climbed to the top, she saw people collapse around her, but no one stopped to offer oxygen for fear that they themselves would die. & # 39; It was terrible, & # 39; she said.

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Fatima Deryan, an experienced Lebanese mountaineer, was near the summit when less experienced climbers started collapsing for her.

As she stopped to help, Deryan realized that she was endangering herself and therefore had to keep moving. & # 39; We are all out of oxygen. You find out that if you help, you are going to die, & she said.

According to Sherpa & # 39; s and climbers, some deaths are avoidable and caused by people being held in long queues at the last 1,000 feet of the climb.

Many of the climbers who die come across what is known as the & # 39; death zone & # 39; about 26,000 feet above sea level, where there simply isn't enough oxygen to sustain the human body.

At that time people rely on oxygen bottles, but climbers can still suffer from disorientation and quickly succumb to suffocation.

Everest & # 39; Death Zone & # 39;

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The death zone is the name used by mountain climbers for high altitudes where there is insufficient oxygen available for people to breathe – this is usually more than 8,000 meters – 26,247ft.

Most of the more than 200 climbers who have died on Mount Everest have died in the death toll area – often in the descent – where experts say there is a risk of switching due to reaching the summit.

At the summit of Mount Everest, the average person takes in about 30 percent of the oxygen in the air they would take at sea level.

That is why a person who was used to breathing in air at sea level could only be present for a few minutes before he became unconscious.

Most climbers have to carry oxygen bottles to reach the top.

Those who suffer in the & # 39; death zone & # 39; quickly become weak and lose the ability to think straight and struggle to make decisions, especially under stress.

Climbers have described some who are in the & # 39; death zone & # 39; died as seated to rest and never to rise again.

Nepal currently has no strict guidelines for those who are allowed to climb Everest, with climbing permits that represent an important source of income for the region.

& # 39; You must qualify to do the Ironman, & # 39; said Alan Arnette, a prominent Everest columnist and climber to the NYT.

& # 39; But you don't have to qualify to climb the highest mountain in the world? What's wrong with this photo? & # 39;

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For Dohring, who did not miss any means in his preparation for the risky adventure, his preparation seems far from that of many of the under-prepared climbers.

He slept in a tent that simulates high altitude conditions and $ 70,000 for the experience.

Despite getting frustrated by the behavior of some of the others who share the beautiful ridges, and sometimes asking why he even did the climb, when he finally reached the summit, he sat down and let his guide take a picture of him with a sign saying : & # 39; Hello mom, love you. & # 39;

When he climbed down, he passed two more dead bodies, neither of which will ever be able to see their mothers again.

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