Europe and Russia are unveiling the landing site for their rover from 2020

Scientists narrow down on the landing site for the upcoming mission that would eventually find out if life ever existed on Mars.

The team behind the mission has recommended a spot with the name Oxia Planum, which is believed to contain a large amount of water billions of years ago.

ESA and Roscosmos will review the proposal before the ExoMars landing site is officially confirmed in mid-2019, prior to its launch in 2020.

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According to ESA, Oxia Planum is on the border of an ancient water that has been drained by many channels. As a result, it is home to layers of clay-rich minerals. A texture map of Oxia Planum is shown above

According to ESA, Oxia Planum is on the border of an ancient water that has been drained by many channels. As a result, it is home to layers of clay-rich minerals. A texture map of Oxia Planum is shown above

Researchers have examined two candidate sites – Oxia Planum and Mawrth Vallis – for the ESA Roscosmos ExoMars rover.

Both sites are rich in evidence of Mars's watery past and are located north of the equator.

& # 39; With ExoMars we are looking for biosignatures & # 39 ;, says ESA's ExoMars 2020 project scientist Jorge Vago.

Although both sites offer valuable scientific opportunities to explore ancient wetlands that could be colonized by microorganisms, Oxia Planum received the majority of the votes.

& # 39; An impressive amount of work has been done to characterize the proposed sites, demonstrating that they meet the scientific requirements for the purposes of the ExoMars mission.

Mawrth Vallis is a scientifically interesting site that has been identified from space. & # 39;

Researchers have examined two candidate sites - Oxia Planum and Mawrth Vallis - for the ESA Roscosmos ExoMars rover. Both sites are rich in evidence of Mars's watery past and are located north of the equator

Researchers have examined two candidate sites - Oxia Planum and Mawrth Vallis - for the ESA Roscosmos ExoMars rover. Both sites are rich in evidence of Mars's watery past and are located north of the equator

Researchers have examined two candidate sites – Oxia Planum and Mawrth Vallis – for the ESA Roscosmos ExoMars rover. Both sites are rich in evidence of Mars's watery past and are located north of the equator

The team behind the mission has recommended a spot called Oxia Planum (shown close-up), where a large amount of water was found billions of years ago. ESA and Roscosmos will review the proposal before the ExoMars landing site is officially confirmed in mid-2019, prior to the launch in 2020

The team behind the mission has recommended a spot called Oxia Planum (shown close-up), where a large amount of water was found billions of years ago. ESA and Roscosmos will review the proposal before the ExoMars landing site is officially confirmed in mid-2019, prior to the launch in 2020

The team behind the mission has recommended a spot called Oxia Planum (shown close-up), where a large amount of water was found billions of years ago. ESA and Roscosmos will review the proposal before the ExoMars landing site is officially confirmed in mid-2019, prior to the launch in 2020

The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has already started looking for signs of biological activity in the Martian atmosphere.

Researchers met at the National Space Center in Leister, United Kingdom for a two-day meeting to discuss the candidate sites.

According to ESA, Oxia Planum is on the border of an ancient water that has been drained by many channels.

As a result, it is home to layers of clay-rich minerals.

The mission is scheduled for launch between July 25 and August 13, 2020 on top of a Proton-M rocket for a long voyage to Mars.

The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has already started looking for signs of biological activity in the Martian atmosphere. After the launch in the summer of 2020, the rover is expected to land on the red planet in March 2021

The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has already started looking for signs of biological activity in the Martian atmosphere. After the launch in the summer of 2020, the rover is expected to land on the red planet in March 2021

The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has already started looking for signs of biological activity in the Martian atmosphere. After the launch in the summer of 2020, the rover is expected to land on the red planet in March 2021

& # 39; With ExoMars we are looking for biosignatures & # 39 ;, says ESA's ExoMars 2020 project scientist Jorge Vago. Although both sites provide valuable scientific opportunities to explore ancient wetlands that may have been colonized by microorganisms, Oxia Planum received the majority of votes & # 39;

& # 39; With ExoMars we are looking for biosignatures & # 39 ;, says ESA's ExoMars 2020 project scientist Jorge Vago. Although both sites provide valuable scientific opportunities to explore ancient wetlands that may have been colonized by microorganisms, Oxia Planum received the majority of votes & # 39;

& # 39; With ExoMars we are looking for biosignatures & # 39 ;, says ESA's ExoMars 2020 project scientist Jorge Vago. Although both sites provide valuable scientific opportunities to explore ancient wetlands that may have been colonized by microorganisms, Oxia Planum received the majority of votes & # 39;

WHAT IS THE EXOMARS MISSION?

The main goal of ExoMars is to find out if life has ever existed on Mars.

The spacecraft on which the Schiaparelli traveled to Mars, Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), carries a probe to study trace gases such as methane around the planet.

Scientists believe methane, a chemical that is strongly connected to life on earth.

The second part of the ExoMars mission, postponed to 2020, provides a rover on the surface of Mars.

It will be the first with the ability to move both over the Earth's surface and drill into the ground to collect and analyze samples.

Schiaparelli was designed to test technologies for landing the rover in four years – but he crashed into the red planet in October 2016.

It will arrive on the red planet in March 2021.

The Rover laboratory is shown in the test room

The Rover laboratory is shown in the test room

The Rover laboratory is shown in the test room

The Mars rover is now far in tests that are mission to verify all its instruments and ability to assume different types of terrain.

On the red planet, the ExoMars robber sends the data it collects back to earth via the Trace Gas Orbiter.

Our ExoMars mission combines extreme performance with the rover's new design features and we are looking forward to running the first European mission on the surface of Mars & # 39 ;, says Francois Spoto, team leader of ExoMars Program.

"Mars-based countries have a long chain of risks, but thanks to the combined skills and expertise of European and Russian industries working with reliable technologies, we are focused on a safe landing. & # 39;

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