Ethiopia breaks the world record for planting 350 million trees

Ethiopia claims it has broken the world record for planting as many as 350 million trees in one day to help restore the landscape of the country destroyed by deforestation

  • The government strongly encourages citizens to plant at least 40 seedlings
  • Forest cover fell from 35% in the early 20th century to 4% in the 2000s
  • In the Green Legacy scheme, mass trees were planted at 1,000 locations in the country
  • Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, who leads the project, planted trees in the southern region of Ethiopia
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Ethiopia has claimed to have broken the world record for planting as many as 350 million trees as part of a green legacy initiative to grow 4 billion trees by the summer.

The government strongly encourages citizens to plant at least 40 seedlings to help restore the landscape of the country.

Experts say that forest cover has fallen from 35 percent of the total country in the early 20th century to just over 4 percent in the 2000s.

The Green Legacy scheme saw mass tree planting take place at 1,000 locations throughout the country, with some public offices that were even closed all day to allow officials to plant seedlings.

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Ethiopia has claimed to have broken the world record for planting as many as 350 million trees as part of a green legacy initiative to grow 4 billion trees by the summer. The government strongly encourages citizens to plant at least 40 seedlings to help restore the country's landscape

Ethiopia has claimed to have broken the world record for planting as many as 350 million trees as part of a green legacy initiative to grow 4 billion trees by the summer. The government strongly encourages citizens to plant at least 40 seedlings to help restore the country's landscape

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, who leads the project, planted trees in the southern region of Ethiopia.

Dr. Getahun Mekuria, Ethiopia's innovation and technology minister, tweet estimates of the number of trees planted during the day. Early in the evening on Monday, he placed the number at 353m.

Employees of the United Nations and foreign embassies in Ethiopia also participated in the project.

Officials were assigned to count the seedlings planted by volunteers, and according to agricultural officials 2.6 billion have been planted so far.

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Farm Africa, an organization involved in Ethiopian forest management, said that less than 4 percent of the country's land is now forested, a sharp drop of around 30 percent at the end of the 19th century.

The population of the country has risen to more than 100 million people, about five times as many as in 1960.

Dr. Getahun Mekuria, Ethiopia's innovation and technology minister, tweet estimates of the number of trees planted during the day. Early in the evening on Monday, he placed the number at 353m

Dr. Getahun Mekuria, Ethiopia's innovation and technology minister, tweet estimates of the number of trees planted during the day. Early in the evening on Monday, he placed the number at 353m

Dr. Getahun Mekuria, Ethiopia's innovation and technology minister, tweet estimates of the number of trees planted during the day. Early in the evening on Monday, he placed the number at 353m

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, pictured, is leading the project and planting trees in the southern region of Ethiopia.

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, pictured, is leading the project and planting trees in the southern region of Ethiopia.

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Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, pictured, is leading the project and planting trees in the southern region of Ethiopia.

This level of growth has increased the demand for agricultural land and timber, which contributed to deforestation.

However, the figures could not be verified, but they far exceed the previous record.

The current world record for planting trees in one day is in the hands of India, which used 800,000 volunteers to plant more than 50 million trees in 2016.

ZME Science reported that & # 39; very little evidence has been provided to support these figures & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; It is clear that Ethiopia had a huge tree planting campaign, but whether or not the numbers are a different story, & # 39; they said.

Experts say the forest cover in the region has fallen from 35 percent of the total country in the early 20th century to just over 4 percent in the 2000s. The population of the country has risen to more than 100 million people, about five times as much as in 1960

Experts say the forest cover in the region has fallen from 35 percent of the total country in the early 20th century to just over 4 percent in the 2000s. The population of the country has risen to more than 100 million people, about five times as much as in 1960

Experts say the forest cover in the region has fallen from 35 percent of the total country in the early 20th century to just over 4 percent in the 2000s. The population of the country has risen to more than 100 million people, about five times as much as in 1960

MAP DISCLOSES THE IMMEDIATE PERFORMANCE REPORTING AROUND THE BOL

Using Landsat images and cloud computing, researchers mapped forest cover worldwide, as well as forest loss and growth. Over 12 years, 888,000 square miles (2.3 million square kilometers) of forest were lost and 309,000 square miles (800,000 square kilometers) re-grown Using Landsat images and cloud computing, researchers mapped forest cover worldwide, as well as forest loss and growth. Over 12 years, 888,000 square miles (2.3 million square kilometers) of forest were lost and 309,000 square miles (800,000 square kilometers) re-grown

Using Landsat images and cloud computing, researchers mapped forest cover worldwide, as well as forest loss and growth. Over 12 years, 888,000 square miles (2.3 million square kilometers) of forest were lost and 309,000 square miles (800,000 square kilometers) re-grown

The destruction caused by deforestation, forest fires and storms on our planet has been revealed in unprecedented details.

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High-resolution maps published by Google show how worldwide forests lost a total of 1.5 million square km members during 2000-2012.

In comparison, that is a loss of forested land that is the same size as the entire state of Alaska.

The maps, made by a team from NASA, Google and the researchers from the University of Maryland, used images from the Landsat satellite.

Each pixel in a Landsat image shows an area the size of a baseball diamond and offers enough data to zoom in on a local region.

Previously, country-to-country comparisons of forestry data were not possible at this accuracy level.

"When you compile datasets that use different methods and definitions, it's hard to synthesize," said Matthew Hansen at the University of Maryland.

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