Erin Andrews, 43, reveals she’s on her 7th round of IVF in a powerful essay

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  • Erin Andrews shared a very personal story with fans this week: she is on her seventh round of in vitro fertilization (IVF).

  • The sports channel, 43, opened up about her IVF journey in a touching essay on her blog, The real deal with Erin Andrews, and noted that she has been doing IVF since she was 35.

  • IVF, in case you’re not familiar with it, is a form of assisted reproductive technology in which sperm from your partner or a donor is matched with your egg or a donor egg to create an embryo in a lab.

Erin Andrews shared a very personal story with fans this week: She is on her seventh round of in vitro fertilization (IVF).

The sports channel, 43, opened up about her IVF journey in a touching essay on her blog, The real deal with Erin Andrews, and noted that she has been doing IVF since she was 35.

“I’ve been trying to do IVF treatment for a while, but sometimes it doesn’t go the way you want. Your body just doesn’t allow it,” she said. “Every cycle is different in a woman’s body, so some months are better than others.” Erin also said that, at age 43, “my body is kind of stacked up against me.”

IVF, in case you’re not familiar with it, is a form of assisted reproductive technology in which sperm from your partner or a donor is matched with your egg or a donor egg to create an embryo in a lab. That embryo is then implanted in your uterus, where the hope is that it will end up in a successful pregnancy.

IVF is expensive and emotionally and physically exhausting, and the chance of success depends on many factors, including a woman’s age. The success rate is about 50% by age 30, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 21% for women in their late 30s, 11% for women 41 to 42, and lower after that.

Erin, who is married to former NHL player Jarret Stoll, pointed out that trying to match her IVF with her work schedule has been difficult.

“When I heard that this was the best time to have another treatment, I had to figure it out all over again. How will I combine this treatment with my work schedule? I got so stressed. When this happens, you really wonder: is it my family’s future or is it my job?”

In the past, Erin said, she felt she had to keep her IVF quiet. “But no, there are so many other women who might put their careers on the back burner because they don’t want to miss out on opportunities,” she said. “It’s so common for people to start a family late and put so many other aspects of their lives on hold.”

So, Erin said, she decided to be open with her show producers about why she might have to show up for work a little later than usual.

“And I’m thankful I did,” she said. “They encouraged me to be open about it because this is real life. It’s not like I’m leaving to take a hot yoga class, I’m trying to have a baby. I’m not ashamed of it, and I want to be vocal and honest about this.”

Erin also pointed out that she’s not really feeling great right now.

“The whole treatment takes such a mental and emotional toll on your body,” she said. “You feel bad. You feel bloated and hormonal for a week and a half. You could go through this whole experience and get absolutely nothing out of it – that’s the crazy part. It’s a lot of money, it’s a lot of time, it’s a lot of mental and physical pain. And more often than not, they are not successful.”

This isn’t the first time Erin has opened up about her personal health: She shared in 2017 that she had been diagnosed and treated for cervical cancer the year before.

Responses to Erin’s blog post have been inundated with messages of support, including from people who have had success with IVF. “I have 27 year old twin boys, it took 2 IVF cycles. To this day I remember the emotional roller coaster that comes with IVF,” one wrote. “I wish you the best of luck and remember you have a whole new team to reach out to when needed!”

“kudos for changing the conversation,” wrote another. “You have a great focus on what you want; I’m sure your luck will change soon. Stay encouraged. We are all behind you.”

Erin noted that she’s not the first woman to go through IVF, and urged people to try and have compassion for others who could be going through the same thing.

“The fertility clinic can be so full at times, it’s heartbreaking, but we’re really not alone here,” she said. “You never know who else is going through this; it could be another co-worker or the person who makes your coffee every day. There are more people than you think.”

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