Environmentalist Grace Watson, 26, eats like a gibbon for a month

Grace Watson has been eating like a gibbon to raise awareness about endangered species

Grace Watson considers herself an enthusiast.

But after working in the jungle, the 26-year-old girl decided to sacrifice her favorite foods such as pasta, cheese, chocolate and coffee to eat like a gibbon for a month.

For the past 23 days, the environmentalist has been imitating a typical wild gibbon diet consisting of fruits, leaves, eggs, seeds, flowers and even insects.

The young woman from Auckland has taken on the unusual challenge for a good cause: creating awareness and money for primates in danger of extinction.

Grace Watson has been eating like a gibbon to raise awareness about endangered species

Grace Watson has been eating like a gibbon to raise awareness about endangered species

For the past 23 days, the environmentalist has been imitating a typical wild gibbon diet consisting of fruits, leaves, eggs, seeds, flowers and even insects.

For the past 23 days, the environmentalist has been imitating a typical wild gibbon diet consisting of fruits, leaves, eggs, seeds, flowers and even insects.

For the past 23 days, the environmentalist has been imitating a typical wild gibbon diet consisting of fruits, leaves, eggs, seeds, flowers and even insects.

Your typical day on a plate eating like a gibbon

Breakfast: Scrambled eggs with spirulina or herbal tea

Lunch: Apples, bananas, tangerines, seeds and edible insects, including mealworms, grasshoppers

Dinner: Vegetable soups, salads or grated beet salad, carrot, apple, with lime, sprinkled with seeds

Despite her determination to strictly comply with the report for 30 days, Grace said the only thing she will not be able to handle are the sheets.

"I can not do that as part of my diet because humans can not break down nutrients like the gibbons in leaves, so I've replaced them with vegetables," he said.

"I allowed myself to cook the vegetables with a little oil and season with salt and pepper, but that's it."

Since losing her daily diet and her culinary delights of pasta, rice, bread, cheese, milk, chocolate and coffee, Grace described the sacrifice as an "immense challenge."

"If they know me, they'll know I appreciate a donut or two, I'm a self-diagnosed sugar and coffee addict, and I celebrate everything that involves butter, cheese or cream," he said.

"I consider" food "one of my hobbies, I spent the last month slowly weaning the coffee in preparation, the last time I tried to give up, I received serious extractions and I spent a whole day vomiting.

"But I'll leave everything for a month for gibbons."

Grace fell in love with Gibbons after taking care of them while working in nature in North Sumatra, a province on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

"I think gibbons are very special," Grace explained.

"They form monogamous pairs, they can be incredibly acrobatic and playful and some species sing a daily duo where both the male and female sing together to publicize their territory and their relationship as a couple."

She has been eating like a gibbon, including even edible insects like mealworms in her diet

She has been eating like a gibbon, including even edible insects like mealworms in her diet

She has been eating like a gibbon, including even edible insects like mealworms in her diet

Grace fell in love with Gibbons after taking care of them while working on nature in North Sumatra, a province on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

Grace fell in love with Gibbons after taking care of them while working on nature in North Sumatra, a province on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

Grace fell in love with Gibbons after taking care of them while working on nature in North Sumatra, a province on the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

What are gibbons?

The Gibbons are & # 39; lesser monkeys & # 39; They belong to the Hylobatidae family and are composed of 18 species scattered among the rainforests of eastern Bangladesh, to India, China and Indonesia, including Sumatra, Borneo and Java.

They are tree dwellers and are greatly affected by deforestation and degradation of their habitat in these areas, as they are displaced or killed as part of the process.

Despite its playful features, Grace said that gibbons are illegally looted from nature and smuggled to different countries to be sold as pets.

He explained how the possession of a pet gibbon represents the status among the rich in some cultures, and they are often locked in small cages inside family houses.

"For every baby gibbon sold in the lucrative black market, most of the members of his family were probably killed while trying to defend that baby," Grace said.

They are also sought as attractions for tourists and entertainment value.

"Tourists will pay money to take a picture with a baby gibbon without noticing the story of how he got there in the first place," he said.

"It's really important to educate people about this issue."

Grace explained that once the captured gibbons reach adulthood and become difficult or dangerous to care for, they are neglected in nature while others die before they mature.

Your new diet of gibbons has included seeds, vegetables, carrots, beets and grasshoppers (left)

With all the funds donated to the Gibbon Protection Society of Malaysia, she admits that the challenge has been "extremely difficult"

With all the funds donated to the Gibbon Protection Society of Malaysia, she admits that the challenge has been "extremely difficult"

With all the funds donated to the Gibbon Protection Society of Malaysia, she admits that the challenge has been "extremely difficult"

And to take the matter into his own hands, he decided to raise money for the difficult situation of the gibbons by giving up his favorite foods for a whole month.

At the start of her new dietary challenge on August 8, Grace will once again enjoy the warm goodness of carbohydrates on September 6.

With all the funds donated to the Gibbon Protection Society of Malaysia, she admits that the challenge has been "extremely difficult".

But with the overwhelming support she has received so far, Grace is determined to spend 30 days, because she knows that every little bit will go a long way in providing a secure future for endangered gibbons.

"The money raised will go to his rehabilitation center, which currently houses eight rescued gibbons," he said.

& # 39; These gibbons will eventually be released again in nature & # 39;

To make a donation, visit Grace Watson's Give a Little page.

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