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Enormous parts of the Great Barrier Reef can be swept away by climate change, environmentalists fear

Enormous parts of the Great Barrier Reef can be swept away by climate change, environmentalists fear

  • New findings indicate that climate change could kill parts of the Great Barrier Reef
  • Temp. increases can cause coral to die and die faster than previously thought
  • Eels run so much danger from human activity that they can die out within generation

Climate change can permanently kill parts of the Great Barrier Reef.

For many years, nature conservationists have been warning about the danger of bleaching, with coral turning white in warming seas.

The process by which the coral expels the algae that live in it is a sign of fear. But the coral can survive this if it receives nutrients quickly enough.

However, new findings indicate that climate change can be dead within a few days.

For many years, nature conservationists have been warning about the danger of bleaching, with coral turning white in warming seas (stock)

For many years, nature conservationists have been warning about the danger of bleaching, with coral turning white in warming seas (stock)

The process by which the coral expels the algae that live in it is a sign of fear. But the coral can survive if it gets enough nutrients quickly (stock)

The process by which the coral expels the algae that live in it is a sign of fear. But the coral can survive if it gets enough nutrients quickly (stock)

The process by which the coral expels the algae that live in it is a sign of fear. But the coral can survive if it gets enough nutrients quickly (stock)

Research into coral species affected by bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in Australia in 2016, showed that rapid increases in water temperature similar to heat waves on land caused them to die and spoil much faster than expected.

In the journal Current Biology, researchers from the University of Newcastle in Australia wrote that the alarming results were the & # 39; effects of severe heat waves & # 39; showed.

Eels run so much danger of human activity that they can die out within a generation, experts warn.

In the journal Current Biology, researchers from the University of Newcastle in Australia wrote that the alarming results were the & # 39; consequences of severe heat wave events & # 39; showed (stock)

In the journal Current Biology, researchers from the University of Newcastle in Australia wrote that the alarming results were the & # 39; consequences of severe heat wave events & # 39; showed (stock)

In the journal Current Biology, researchers from the University of Newcastle in Australia wrote that the alarming results were the & # 39; consequences of severe heat wave events & # 39; showed (stock)

Climate change, overfishing and the creation of more dams and weirs have seen the worldwide number drop by 95 percent in 40 years.

Now the Environment Agency says that migratory eels in Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex have fallen because the fish are more difficult to negotiate on waterways.

Jez Wood, an agency eel counter, said last year only 8,000 were registered in the Wensum, Norwich – against 34,000 in 2016.

So far only 2,162 have been seen this year. & # 39; It's no exaggeration to say they could disappear in our lives, & # 39; he said.

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