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Comb McLeod

A massive manhunt in a remote Canadian village involving police, army, search dogs and drones has not found any trace of two suspects of teenage murders who have been fleeing for two weeks – according to survival experts they might die in the rough terrain and perhaps never to be found.

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The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said at the end of Monday that an extensive search in the small village of York Landing in Manitoba had failed to find fugitives Kam McLeod (19) and Bryer Schmegelsky (18).

Researchers had received a tip on Sunday afternoon that two young men were looking for food at a landfill in York Landing.

The city has 443 inhabitants and is so remote that it can only be reached by air or ferry. There is also a railway line 15 miles south of the city.

Comb McLeod

Bryer Schmegelsky

Bryer Schmegelsky

Kam McLeod, 19, (left) and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, (right) have been fleeing in Northern Canada since they killed three people in British Columbia two weeks ago, including the American Chynna Deese, 24, her 23-year-old – old Australian friend Lucas Fowler and Vancouver professor Leonard Dyck

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said at the end of Monday that an extensive search in the small village of York Landing in Manitoba had failed to find the fugitives
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The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said at the end of Monday that an extensive search in the small village of York Landing in Manitoba had failed to find the fugitives

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said at the end of Monday that an extensive search in the small village of York Landing in Manitoba had failed to find the fugitives

& # 39; After a thorough and thorough search, #rcmpmb was unable to substantiate the tip in York Landing. RCMP resources remain in the York Landing & Gillam areas. We thank the community for their patience and understanding and ask them to stay vigilant, & # 39; said the RCMP.

The two teenagers are wanted because of the murder of the American Chynna Deese, 24, her 23-year-old Australian friend Lucas Fowler and professor of botany, Leonard Dyck, in Vancouver.

They are suspected of killing the three people in British Columbia two weeks ago before fleeing 1,800 miles in a stolen Toyota RAV4.

McLeod and Schmegelsky were last seen in the town of Gillam and their burnt-out car was found nearby last week.

Extensive search efforts were previously concentrated on Gillam before going to York Landing on Sunday, which is 55 miles away.

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The Royal Canadian Air Force took part in the search during the weekend, with the authorities spending up to 20 hours each day in the remote area for the boys.

The search for the two teenagers shifted to the remote York Landing on Sunday after they were reportedly looking for food. York Landing can only be reached by plane or ferry, although a rail line runs about 15 miles away

The search for the two teenagers shifted to the remote York Landing on Sunday after they were reportedly looking for food. York Landing can only be reached by plane or ferry, although a rail line runs about 15 miles away

The search for the two teenagers shifted to the remote York Landing on Sunday after they were reportedly looking for food. York Landing can only be reached by plane or ferry, although a rail line runs about 15 miles away

This map shows the movements of the teenagers since the murders took place

This map shows the movements of the teenagers since the murders took place

This map shows the movements of the teenagers since the murders took place

The area around Gillam, Manitoba, consists of dense bush, forest and wetlands. It has prompted officials to warn that teenagers may perish before they are even found by the police
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The area around Gillam, Manitoba, consists of dense bush, forest and wetlands. It has prompted officials to warn that teenagers may perish before they are even found by the police

The area around Gillam, Manitoba, consists of dense bush, forest and wetlands. It has prompted officials to warn that teenagers may perish before they are even found by the police

Police warned that there were polar bears near the area they were looking for and said that the threat of an attack had become a reality. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police on Saturday distributed a photo (above) of a polar bear found by seekers near Gillam

Police warned that there were polar bears near the area they were looking for and said that the threat of an attack had become a reality. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police on Saturday distributed a photo (above) of a polar bear found by seekers near Gillam

Police warned that there were polar bears near the area they were looking for and said that the threat of an attack had become a reality. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police on Saturday distributed a photo (above) of a polar bear found by seekers near Gillam

Searchers have used military helicopters, drones, tracking dogs and sensor technology to track the pair. Authorities have also been visiting door-to-door house seekers in their homes and looking for abandoned buildings hoping to find the pair or find clues.

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Officials have warned that McLeod and Schmegelsky could succumb to the rough terrain before the police even found them, given the threats of polar bears, grizzly bears and blood-sucking flies.

While searching the area consisting of dense bush, forest and wetlands, officers have already encountered at least one polar bear and are looking for grizzly bears, black bears and wolves, which are common in the region.

Authorities said it is around 1,000 officers who are assisting in the search for the two fugitives.

The police have previously signaled the possibility that the teenagers from the city of Gillam have escaped by a slow-moving train or by taking a ride with an unsuspecting passer-by before the news about the manhunt hit the area.

Clint Sawchuk, the operator of Nelson River Adventures in Gillam, said he believes they probably walked along a railway line or jumped on a freight train that runs west from Gillam to York Landing.

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& # 39; I said from the start, the only way to leave Gillam is to walk the railroad or travel over water, & # 39; he said.

American Chynna Deese, 24, and her 23-year-old Australian friend Lucas Fowler

American Chynna Deese, 24, and her 23-year-old Australian friend Lucas Fowler

Vancouver botany professor Leonard Dyck

Vancouver botany professor Leonard Dyck

They are wanted because of the murders of the American Chynna Deese (24) and her 23-year-old Australian friend Lucas Fowler (left), and Vancouver botany professor Leonard Dyck (right).

Searchers have used military helicopters, drones, tracking dogs and sensor technology to track the pair

Searchers have used military helicopters, drones, tracking dogs and sensor technology to track the pair

Searchers have used military helicopters, drones, tracking dogs and sensor technology to track the pair

RCMP officers used tracking dogs and other means while searching the Gillam area for the fugitive teenagers at the weekend

RCMP officers used tracking dogs and other means while searching the Gillam area for the fugitive teenagers at the weekend

RCMP officers used tracking dogs and other means while searching the Gillam area for the fugitive teenagers at the weekend

He said it was logical for him that after a week in the wilderness the duo would be desperately searching for food – no matter how rancid – at the garbage dump in York Landing, desperately searching for food.

Members of the Bear Clan, a native community police group, saw two tall, skinny men at the landfill. The men fled into the wilderness after they were seen. The locals wonder why the two men would flee if they were not the fugitives.

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Sawchuk downplayed the odds that McLeod and Schmegelsky were being attacked by wild animals while hiding in bushland, especially as they headed west, away from Hudson Bay.

& # 39; They are going the wrong way for polar bears and grizzly bears, & # 39; he said. & # 39; If they were on their way to the east coast, they would have been sewn. & # 39;

But he said there are many other dangers and obstacles.

& # 39; There is swamp and heavy bushes, & # 39; he said. & # 39; You can walk through it, but it's slow and you can get to your knees in the swamp and we've just had rain, so the mosquitoes are at full speed and the sand flies are still out. & # 39 ;

An RCMP source told Fox News that a family member described the teenagers as & # 39; experienced survivalists & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; But they don't have any professional training we know, & # 39; said the source.

Authorities have visited door-to-door residents in their homes and search abandoned buildings hoping to find the duo or find clues

Authorities have visited door-to-door residents in their homes and search abandoned buildings hoping to find the duo or find clues

Authorities have visited door-to-door residents in their homes and search abandoned buildings hoping to find the duo or find clues

In the remote cities, door-to-door officers are shown looking for the fugitives

In the remote cities, door-to-door officers are shown looking for the fugitives

In the remote cities, door-to-door officers are shown looking for the fugitives

RCMP officers depart early in the morning on a passenger train in Gillam hoping to collect every piece of information that could lead to the whereabouts of the murder suspects
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RCMP officers depart early in the morning on a passenger train in Gillam hoping to collect every piece of information that could lead to the whereabouts of the murder suspects

RCMP officers depart early in the morning on a passenger train in Gillam hoping to collect every piece of information that could lead to the whereabouts of the murder suspects

& # 39; You really don't want to stay in a small town when all of Canada is looking for you. If they left Gillam, they would probably go to a larger center where they would go up and find food. & # 39;

McLeod and Schmegelsky – old school friends – have been on the run since the bodies of Sydney backpacker Lucas Fowler and his North Carolina girlfriend Chynna Deese were discovered on a highway in Liard Hot Springs in British Columbia on July 15.

The old Fowler and Deese Chevrolet broke down on the Alaska Highway and left them behind. Their bodies riddled with bullets were found in a ditch near the van.

The body of the botanist Leonard Dyck from the University of British Columbia was found four days later and 300 miles away in Dease Lake. His body was found dead on another highway near a car whose suspects probably burned.

The teenagers are accused of second-degree murder at the death of Dyck.

The duo then drove more than 1,800 miles east to the province of Manitoba in a stolen RAV 4.

The Toyota was crashed a week ago in a ditch of a sharp turn on a dirt road just outside of Gillam. It seems that the teenagers lost control of the vehicle.

It was set on fire and then abandoned, left with camping gear. They probably escaped in bushland.

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