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English could say ‘let them go’ to the Scots if Nicola Sturgeon’s referendum calls carry on

Englishmen could tell Scots to ‘let them go’ if Nicola Sturgeon’s referendum goes ahead, claims former Northern Ireland Prime Minister Arlene Foster

  • Baroness Foster warned that Engels could grow weary of the intense independence campaign
  • She said Scottish independence would make the four nations a ‘much lesser place’
  • Voters need to better understand the benefits of staying in the UK, she argued

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Former Prime Minister of Northern Ireland Arlene Foster has warned that the Union between the UK’s four nations could be lost due to continued calls for a Scottish referendum.

Baroness Foster, who recently became chairman of the new organization Together UK in support of the Union, said there is a chance the English will say ‘let them go’ when they get tired of Nicola Sturgeon’s intense independence campaign.

She said, “What worries me sometimes… [is people] saying that ‘if Scotland wants to go, let them go.

“It’s not just Scotland that will lose if they leave. The rest of us will lose it all too… we need to have a wider conversation about that, especially in England,” she told the Telegraph.

Baroness Arlene Foster (Pictured) Has Warned That The Union Between The Uk'S Four Nations Could Weaken As Voters Tire Of Continued Calls For A Scottish Referendum

Baroness Arlene Foster (pictured) has warned that the Union between the UK’s four nations could weaken as voters tire of continued calls for a Scottish referendum

The First Minister of Scotland’s fight to hold a second Scottish independence referendum suffered a blow after the Supreme Court ruled unanimously that she cannot legislate without Westminster’s approval.

Ms Sturgeon admitted she will not try to organize a ‘wild’ vote – acknowledging that any path to independence must be ‘legitimate’.

However, she said the Scottish National Party (SNP) will contest the issue of independence in the next general election – expected to be in 2024.

A recent poll showed that support for Scottish independence has risen after Mrs Sturgeon was denied access to a referendum.

Support for the SNP’s separatist movement was 52 percent excluding ‘don’t know’ – compared to 48 percent the union wanted to keep.

A similar poll from September 18 last year found that 44 percent would vote yes and 47 percent no.

Baroness Foster has warned that this ‘never-ending’ campaign could threaten unity between the British nations as the people have grown weary of such vigorous separatism.

She said it’s important to understand that if Scotland or Northern Ireland left the Union, the UK would become a “much lesser place”.

She added that she has heard people claim that if they want to leave, “why are we stopping them” rather than making an effort to encourage them to stay.

Nicola Sturgeon (Pictured) Has Said The Snp Will Fight In The Next General Election - Expected In 2024 - Over The Issue Of Independence

Nicola Sturgeon (Pictured) Has Said The Snp Will Fight In The Next General Election - Expected In 2024 - Over The Issue Of Independence

Nicola Sturgeon (pictured) has said the SNP will fight in the next general election – expected in 2024 – over the issue of independence

According To The Latest Poll, Support For The Snp'S Separatist Drive Was 52 Percent Excluding 'Don'T Know' - Compared To 48 Percent Wanting To Keep The Union

According To The Latest Poll, Support For The Snp'S Separatist Drive Was 52 Percent Excluding 'Don'T Know' - Compared To 48 Percent Wanting To Keep The Union

According to the latest poll, support for the SNP’s separatist drive was 52 percent excluding ‘don’t know’ – compared to 48 percent wanting to keep the union

Last month, Baroness Foster became chair of the Together UK Foundation, which campaigns for the Union and aims to fight growing separatism.

She said voters need to better understand the benefits of staying in the UK.

“We need to have those conversations about why the UK is important to all parts of the UK, not just the parts where separatists are.”

She added that Unionists also needed to engage better with Britain’s international allies to remind them of the importance of a united UK. ‘not least from a NATO point of view, from a defense point of view, from a security point of view’.

She highlighted the US as a crucial ally because of the large number of American-Irish voters there.

Rishi Sunak has apparently dropped former Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s ‘Project Love’, which pushed voters in all four countries to support the Union, the Telegraph said.

Instead, Sunak focuses on the government’s involvement with each of the four nations, trying to show that Westminster plays an important role for all UK voters.

Meanwhile, Labor is expected to unveil its own proposals tomorrow to save the Union.

The review, led by Gordon Brown, will recommend replacing the House of Lords with an upper house of nations and regions and giving more powers to local regions and devolved administrations.

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Jacky

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