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England cricket: Eoin Morgan insists he does not regret retiring from international action

Sitting in the ECB boardroom with Lord, Eoin Morgan reflected on his pioneering career and saw the World Cup he did so much to win, high on the wall to his right.

“I haven’t seen that here,” said Morgan, who led England to that dramatic Super Over win against New Zealand three years ago. “That’s pretty cool. It’s unbelievable.

“That reminds me of the journey. The hardest, most challenging time but also the most fun, culminating in the final here with the best people. Good times.’ Then a pause. ‘Actually, I think that’s a replica. I do. I don’t think it’s real.’

Eoin Morgan has insisted he does not regret his decision to withdraw from England action

Eoin Morgan has insisted he does not regret his decision to withdraw from England action

Morgan has always been the real deal from the moment Andrew Strauss tasked him with transforming England’s white ball cricket in the wake of the 2015 World Cup low and on that journey that culminated on that storied day at Lord’s.

Gradually, the Dubliner became one of the most important figures in English cricket history, the man who changed the game of the cue ball and has now even had his blueprint copied by the English test team through Ben Stokes and his great friend Brendon McCullum.

But it’s a journey that has come to an abrupt halt as Morgan has decided to take time for his international career, at age 35, ahead of a Twenty20 World Cup in Australia in October, which is expected to be his swan song. to be. Instead, England will now be led by Jos Buttler, who will be confirmed as Morgan’s successor later this week.

Morgan confirmed his decision on Tuesday, but is stepping down after winning the 2019 World Cup

Morgan confirmed his decision on Tuesday, but is stepping down after winning the 2019 World Cup

“It had been a little over a week,” Morgan said when asked to explain why he’d kept quiet for the day. “I went to bed writing notes about different things, team-oriented, on my way to the World Cup. How to get there, what we do, the normal course of business that I do.

“Then I woke up the next morning with a completely different feeling, a feeling I’d never had before. And it’s hard to describe unless you’ve experienced it. I’ve talked to many people over the past three years leading up to this transition and the most common theme is “when you know, you know”. I always thought they were full of shit.

“Honestly, I sat there and thought, ‘I’m not sure.’ But that’s how it felt on that Monday. I can’t point to one thing. I had just come to the end of the road.’

That Monday was the day after Morgan made his second duck in consecutive games against the Netherlands in Amsterdam and concerns about his lack of runs started to grow. Suddenly, despite opposing protests from the players who adored him, the World Cup seemed a step too far and Morgan knew it.

He is one of the most important figures in the history of cricket and has changed the game of white balls

He is one of the most important figures in the history of cricket and has changed the game of white balls

Morgan however made ducks in each of the first two games vs Holland and missed the third

Morgan however made ducks in each of the first two games vs Holland and missed the third

“I was able to see a picture of it before I was out of shape,” Morgan continued. “And if the team was doing nonsense, I could see a picture of that too. This time I couldn’t see it either. The feeling that day was that the World Cup was a million miles away.’

Morgan insists he will not regret the timing of his sudden departure. “The day it hit me was a difficult day, but I’ve been very happy ever since,” he said.

“There was no temptation to continue. I’ve always put the team first no matter what my retirement looks like and if I’d tried to hold out until the World Cup it would have been incredibly unfair for the team. And it would have been unfair to our fans.”

Nor was there any temptation to play one last game in that final ODI in Amsterdam, even though the groin injury that would have ruled him out was real.

“It was part of how I felt that day,” Morgan said. “I’ve woken up in the past with back cramps, hernias, and everything. But I would work my way out of bed and see a way forward. This was an old injury that flared up again and contributed to my decision.”

He has told reporters there was 'no temptation' for him to continue playing for his country

He has told reporters there was ‘no temptation’ for him to continue playing for his country

Wicket-keeper Jos Buttler (C) ready to replace Morgan for the T20 World Cup

Wicket-keeper Jos Buttler (C) ready to replace Morgan for the T20 World Cup

Now he will initially distance himself from his team – ‘but I have told the coach (Matthew Mott) I will always be on the phone if he needs me’ – work for Sky to play the upcoming whiteball matches against India and South Africa for London Spirit in the Hundred and continue with a postgraduate diploma in strategic leadership and governance from the University of Liverpool, which he started earlier this summer.

He will not be short of offers, the most likely of which will be a long-term return to England as a mentor.

“I think the England team has incredible potential not only for years to come, but also for the next generation,” added Morgan, who is still “looking” for the right future role.

“There won’t be any mixed feelings if they’re going to do great things without me. I’ll be over the moon if they win this World Cup and the over-50s next year.”

Thanks to the Morgan Revolution, England has every opportunity.

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