Elon Musk says that SpaceX has repaired BOTH rocket power covers from the ocean undamaged and will reuse them

Elon Musk says SpaceX BOTH restored rocket power covers from the ocean after Falcon Heavy launch and will use them again for the first time

  • SpaceX has succeeded in restoring both charging current caps from the Falcon Heavy rocket
  • Boats could scoop the streamline hoods from the Atlantic Ocean without damaging them
  • They will now be put to work on Falcon 9 as part of a Starlink mission later this year
  • Musk says that each tub costs $ 6 million to build, so reusing them saves money

SpaceX has managed to reach a new historic milestone again.

Amid the fanfare band of the Falcon Heavy successfully embarked on its second trip to space, Elon Musk announced that his company was able to restore both tub halves of the mega socket for the first time.

In a tweet late on Thursday, Musk confirmed that both shell halves had been restored undamaged from the Atlantic Ocean.

The next step is to put the streamline hoods back to work on a Falcon 9 rocket that will blow additional Starlink satellites into orbit scheduled for later this year.

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SpaceX has managed to reach a new historic milestone again. Elon Musk announced that his company could for the first time restore both shell halves of the mega socket (photo)

SpaceX has managed to reach a new historic milestone again. Elon Musk announced that his company could for the first time restore both shell halves of the mega socket (photo)

& # 39; Both streamline caps recovered & # 39 ;, Musk wrote in a tweet. & # 39; Will be flying on Starlink mission later this year. & # 39;

Responding to another user's tweet, the tech mogul explained that each cockpit has its own aircraft electronics and nitrogen thrusters, as well as steerable parachutes, to help them safely return to Earth.

Now that they have been recovered, SpaceX is starting to clean up the streamline covers for reuse.

The streamliner is a piece of material that is part of the rocket's nose cone and protects the load during launch, including things like satellites.

The streamliner is a piece of material that is part of the rocket's nose cone and protects the load, including things like satellites, during launch. Depicted is the cockpit on a recovery boat

The streamliner is a piece of material that is part of the rocket's nose cone and protects the load, including things like satellites, during launch. Depicted is the cockpit on a recovery boat

The streamliner is a piece of material that is part of the rocket's nose cone and protects the load, including things like satellites, during launch. Depicted is the cockpit on a recovery boat

Musk has tried to restore the streamline covers and reuse them for additional launches because they are expensive to build.

He estimates that each streamline hood costs around $ 6 million, which is about 10 percent of the cost of a Falcon 9 launch.

SpaceX has tried to restore streamlining loads during previous launches, but to no avail.

The company even built a boat with a huge net attached to it, affectionately Mr. Steven, trying to repair the streamlining caps.

It seems that Steven was not used during yesterday's launch; instead, recovery boats were able to scoop the streamline hoods out of the water and bring them back to land.

SpaceX built a boat with a huge net attached to it, affectionately named Steven (photo), to try to restore the streamlining caps. However, this time the boat was not used

SpaceX built a boat with a huge net attached to it, affectionately named Steven (photo), to try to restore the streamlining caps. However, this time the boat was not used

SpaceX built a boat with a huge net attached to it, affectionately named Steven (photo), to try to restore the streamlining caps. However, this time the boat was not used

SpaceX & # 39; s Falcon Heavy rocket successfully took its second flight ever on Thursday afternoon when it took off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida with Lockheed Martin & Arabsat 6A communications satellite

SpaceX & # 39; s Falcon Heavy rocket successfully took its second flight ever on Thursday afternoon when it took off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida with Lockheed Martin & Arabsat 6A communications satellite

SpaceX & # 39; s Falcon Heavy rocket successfully took its second flight ever on Thursday afternoon when it took off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida with Lockheed Martin & Arabsat 6A communications satellite

But the cockpit recovery was not the only memorable achievement that came from yesterday's launch.

The launch marks the Falcon Heavy's second voyage to space, as well as the first commercial mission, when the mega-socket orbited the Lockheed Martin Arabsat 6A communications satellite.

SpaceX also succeeded in making history by putting three boosters back on Earth for the first time.

Just minutes after the launch, the central core of the giant rocket landed safely on the SpaceX offshore barge called & # 39; of course I'm still in love with you & # 39; while the two side boosters landed again at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station & # 39; s Landing Zone 1. and 2.

& # 39; We landed the center core for the first time, & # 39; said a SpaceX presenter. & # 39; Three for three boosters today for the Falcon Heavy. & # 39;

It has been fourteen months since the launch of Falcon Heavy, when it dropped to become the most powerful rocket in use today.

The latest launch marked the first time Falcon Heavy was flying using the new Block 5 hardware, which is designed to last longer than previous versions without the need for refurbishment.

WHY DOES SPACEX USE RACKETS AND OTHER PARTS?

SpaceX tries to reuse rockets, cargo streamlining caps, boosters and other components to try and reduce the costs of each missile mission.

The total cost of one of its Falcon 9 launches is estimated at £ 44 million ($ 61 million), while each of the larger Falcon Heavy flights costs £ 65 million ($ 90 million).

The space company has previously reused first rocket amplifiers from the first and second phases, in addition to one of its previously flown Dragon capsules.

The Dragon spacecraft is used as the final phase of SpaceX missions to replenish the international space station.

In an incredible feat, the Falcon Heavy side boosters landed smoothly back on Earth on two separate launch blocks of about 8 minutes in

In an incredible feat, the Falcon Heavy side boosters landed smoothly back on Earth on two separate launch blocks of about 8 minutes in

& # 39; The falcons have landed & # 39 ;, the announcers said, while people cheered and hunted wildly in the background

& # 39; The falcons have landed & # 39 ;, the announcers said, while people cheered and hunted wildly in the background

In an incredible feat, the reusable Falcon Heavy side boosters landed smoothly back to Earth on two separate launch blocks of about 8 minutes.

SpaceX is currently testing a system to restore the power cap of its Falcon 9 rockets.

The charging current caps are bivalve shell-shaped nose cone figures that protect the cargo of the vessel.

SpaceX has repaired a charging current lining for the first time in 2017.

During the first launch of the Falcon Heavy in February 2018, the company brought two of the boosters to the company simultaneously on separate launches.

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