Elon Musk criticizes Apple twice during Tesla earnings for using cobalt and how it does business

Tesla CEO Elon Musk doesn’t mince words and on Monday his latest target became the world’s most valuable company: Apple.

Musk, 50, who has historically expressed his views on the state of the auto industry, the competition for his SpaceX company, and a host of other topics, turned to Apple over the use of cobalt in his iPhone and Mac. batteries and how it does business.

Asked about its commodities partners, Musk said the company uses significantly less cobalt than Cupertino, California-based Apple.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk spied on Apple for using cobalt in batteries and how it does business

Musk said Tesla uses 2% cobalt, while Apple uses 100% in its batteries

Musk said Tesla uses 2% cobalt, while Apple uses 100% in its batteries

“And there’s somehow a misconception that Tesla uses a lot of cobalt, but we don’t actually,” Musk said, according to one transcript of the conversation. “I think Apple uses nearly 100 percent cobalt in their batteries in cell phones and laptops.”

“But Tesla doesn’t use cobalt in our iron phosphate packages, and almost none in the nickel-based chemicals,” Musk added.

“On a weighted average basis, we could use two percent cobalt compared to, say, Apple’s 100 percent cobalt. Anyway, it’s not really a package that we expect to have basically zero cobalt going forward.”

At the company’s Battery Day Event in September 2020, Tesla said it would eventually make its batteries with cobalt-free cathodes because of the way it’s mined and the damage it does to the environment.

Cobalt is also called the ‘blood diamond of batteries’, according to The edge.

Both companies, along with several other tech giants, were named in a lawsuit 2019 by an international human rights group on how cobalt is mined by young children.

At Apple Environmental progress report 2021, the tech giant said 100 percent of its cobalt smelters and refiners (along with other metals) participated in an independent third-party audit.

The company added that it is giving “priority” to 14 materials, including cobalt, to move to recycling and renewable content.

“We’ve worked to increase our recycled cobalt year over year — doubling the amount of recycled material used in fiscal 2020 from the previous year,” Apple wrote in the report.

‘And the cobalt from iPhone batteries that Daisy disassembled is going back to the general market. This more efficient and economical approach makes the material available to others outside our supply chain and continues to deliver a positive environmental benefit.”

Apple has not yet responded to a request for comment from DailyMail.com.

Musk also had some picks for how Apple does its business, with its so-called “walled garden” approach to how it controls all facets of its products, including the software, hardware and other aspects.

“But I think we want to emphasize that our goal is to support the advent of renewable energy, it’s not to create a walled garden and use it to knock down our competitors, which is sometimes seen by some companies. used,” Musk said. in response to a question about opening up its Supercharger network to competitors.

Musk then faked a cough and said, “Apple.”

This isn’t the first time Musk has taken pictures at Apple, despite revealing in 2020 that he approached the company and CEO Tim Cook about a takeover, but Cook declined his call.

This isn't Musk's first time taking pictures at Apple, despite revealing in 2020 that he approached the company and CEO Tim Cook about an acquisition, though Cook didn't take his call.

This isn’t Musk’s first time taking pictures at Apple, despite revealing in 2020 that he approached the company and CEO Tim Cook about an acquisition, though Cook didn’t take his call.

In 2018, he said Apple wasn’t as innovative as it used to be, and three years earlier called Apple a “Tesla graveyard” for ex-Tesla employees.

The two aren’t directly competing with each other, but Apple is reportedly working on an electric vehicle under Project Titan, which is headed by ex-Tesla employee Doug Field.

Earlier this month, DailyMail.com reported that Musk had confirmed it would open its global network of 25,000 Supercharger stations to other electric car manufacturers by the end of 2021.

In the US, Tesla’s cars use the company’s proprietary connector, meaning automakers who want access to the more than 900 charging stations the company operates domestically will need to supply an adapter to their drivers.

In Europe, Tesla uses a CCS DC connector, which has become an international standard.

It’s unclear at this point whether Tesla will start superchargers in one region or open its global network at once.

Apple has come under pressure from both competitors and lawmakers over its App Store policies, and has been sued by Fortnite maker Epic Games for having a monopoly on the iPhone, the iOS ecosystem and the App Store.

Last month, Cook House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called to warn of the “hasty” antitrust laws floating around Capitol Hill.

CONTINUED! THESE ARE THE ANTITRUST LAWS AGAINST BIG TECHNOLOGY

google

In October 2020, the Justice Department sued Google for its market size.

In December 2020, 38 states, including Texas, filed a lawsuit against Alphabet Inc., accusing it of violating antitrust law regarding its online advertising activities.

facebook

In July 2019, the Justice Department said it was expanding its investigation to include “search, social media and some online retail services,” a clear reference to Facebook.

The Federal Trade Commission and 46 states sued Facebook in December 2020, accusing it of buying and freezing smaller businesses to stifle competition.

Amazon

In July 2019, the Justice Department said it was expanding its investigation to include “search, social media and some online retail services,” a clear reference to Amazon.

The FTC is investigating whether Amazon’s sale of its own products on its marketplace is an inherent conflict of interest.

In June 2021, the FTC said it would review Amazon’s proposed acquisition of movie studio MGM.

Apple

In June 2019, the Justice Department said it was investigating Apple’s app store after some developers accused the tech giant of competing with them and then trying to remove third-party apps from the App Store.

In August 2020, Epic Games, maker of “Fortnite,” said it was suing Apple over concerns it has a monopoly on the iPhone, the iOS ecosystem and the App Store. The case went to court in May 2021 and is awaiting ruling.

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