Elon Musk Confirms Tesla Will Open Supercharger Stations For Other Electric Cars By The End Of The Year

Elon Musk has confirmed that Tesla will allow electric vehicle owners from other companies to charge at its Supercharger stations. The option will be available before the end of 2021.

“We are opening our Supercharger network to other EVs later this year,” the 50-year-old CEO tweeted on Tuesday.

In the US, Tesla’s cars use the company’s proprietary connector, meaning automakers who want access to the more than 900 charging stations the company operates domestically will need to supply an adapter to their drivers.

In Europe, Tesla uses a CCS DC connector, which has become an international standard.

In a follow-up tweet, Musk confirmed that all of the company’s 25,000 Superchargers would eventually be available to non-Tesla drivers.

Elon Musk confirmed on Tuesday that Tesla’s network of more than 25,000 Supercharger stations in more than 2,700 locations will open to drivers of other EVs by the end of 2021.

In a tweet revealing that the Supercharger network will be open to other EVs this year, Elon Musk said the company created its own proprietary charging connector because there was no industry standard at the time.

In a tweet revealing that the Supercharger network will be open to other EVs this year, Elon Musk said the company created its own proprietary charging connector because there was no industry standard at the time.

It’s not the first time Musk has talked about opening the Supercharger network.

“We’re happy to support other automakers and let them use our Supercharger stations,” Musk said in 2018 TechCrunch. “This is not a walled garden.”

Other EV manufacturers “should simply pay the portion of the cost commensurate with their vehicle usage,” he added. “And they should be able to accept our charging rate or at the very least — and our connector, at the very least have an adapter to our connector.”

But this is the first time he gets some sort of timeline.

While Musk said all of the company's 25,000 Superchargers would eventually be available to non-Tesla drivers, it's not clear whether the service will be available first in Europe or rolled out globally at the same time.

While Musk said all of the company’s 25,000 Superchargers would eventually be available to non-Tesla drivers, it’s not clear whether the service will be available first in Europe or rolled out globally at the same time.

Reaction to the news on Twitter has been mixed, with: a user says: they agreed to open up the network “as long as non-Teslas pay some annual dues and the experience costs don’t change.”

Another Tesla owner in California called it a “terrible move,” suggesting it would extend the wait time to be fully charged.

“Some superchargers sometimes have a 30 minute wait with other Teslas,” wrote @LAdetectives. “Mix other EVs and it becomes a real cluster —-.”

Musk’s confirmation came in response to a tweet from a user who defended Tesla against those who criticized him for building its own charging network.

Musk's comments about opening Supercharger stations came in response to a tweet defending Tesla against those who criticized building its own charging network.

Musk’s comments about opening Supercharger stations came in response to a tweet defending Tesla against those who criticized building its own charging network.

“It’s funny how many people are now wondering why Tesla made their own proprietary charging connector and it’s not fair to other EVs,” he tweeted. @Teslatino.

How about no support for @elonmusk as he advanced technology. Has his team come up with a reliable way to recharge the fleet? Take it!’

In response, Musk said his company made its own connector because there was no industry standard in 2012 “and Tesla was” [the] only maker of long-range electric cars.’

“It’s a pretty thin connector for both low and high power charging,” he added. That said, we’ll be opening up our Supercharger network to other EVs later this year.”

The recognition comes about a month after reports indicated that the Supercharger network would be open to non-Tesla cars starting next year.

Tesla started with six Supercharger locations throughout California, but has grown into a global operation with 2,700 stations in North America, Asia and Europe and parts of the Middle East

Tesla started with six Supercharger locations throughout California, but has grown into a global operation with 2,700 stations in North America, Asia and Europe and parts of the Middle East

The Palo Alto, California-based company had apparently told Norwegian officials it would start the process in September 2022, as originally reported by Electrek.

According to the minutes of Tesla’s meeting with Vestland fylkeskommune, the governing body of the Norwegian county of Vestland, “the condition for benefits is that the infrastructure is developed with a public offering.”

Tesla had also reportedly spoken to officials in Germany about opening up its network to other automakers.

It’s unclear at this point whether Tesla will start superchargers in one region or open its global network at once.

The fact that its European models use the same connectors as other EVs suggests that’s where the program might start, TechCruch reported.

Tesla unveiled its Supercharger network in September 2012, several months after the release of its Model S sedan

Tesla unveiled its Supercharger network in September 2012, several months after the release of its Model S sedan

Tesla unveiled the first Supercharger stations in September 2012, several months after the release of its Model S sedan.

It started with six locations in California, but has grown into a global operation with locations in North America, Asia and Europe and parts of the Middle East.

Initially, Tesla offered free supercharging for both its Model S and Model X vehicles, but Musk said several years ago that the benefit was not “really sustainable” as production of the vehicles increased.

It brought back free supercharges for the Model 3 for a period in 2018, but has more recently ended the benefit.

Prices vary by location and may change from time to time, Tesla has previously said.

In 2018, CEO Elon Musk said he wanted to place a restaurant in one of the company's Los Angeles Supercharger stations

In 2018, CEO Elon Musk said he wanted to place a restaurant in one of the company’s Los Angeles Supercharger stations

In May, Tesla filed a trademark application for takeout, pop-up, self-service and sit-down restaurants, an idea first floated by Musk several years ago.

The “restaurant services” may be located at or near the company’s Supercharger stations.

In 2018, Musk tweeted that he wanted to create “an old-fashioned drive-in,” with roller-skating waitresses and dinner at one of the company’s Supercharger stations in LA.

.