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Elon Musk blasts Americans’ work ethic and praises Chinese staff who ‘burn the 3am oil’

Elon Musk criticized the poor work ethic of the United States and praised the Chinese staff who stay in the factory “burning the 3 am oil”.

The Tesla CEO, who once slept on the floor of his Fremont factory during production of the company’s Model 3 car, said Americans are “trying to avoid going to work at all” compared to their Chinese counterparts.

Speaking in an interview with the financial timeshe said: ‘I think some very strong companies will come out of China.

“There are a lot of super-talented, hard-working people in China who are strong believers in manufacturing.

‘And they won’t just be burning the midnight oil. They will be burning the oil at 3 am. So they won’t even leave the factory kind of stuff.

“Whereas in America, people are trying to avoid going to work.”

Elon Musk criticized America's poor work ethic and praised Chinese staff staying at the factory 'burning off the 3am oil' (pictured during Financial Times interview)

Elon Musk criticized America’s poor work ethic and praised Chinese staff staying at the factory ‘burning off the 3am oil’ (pictured during Financial Times interview)

The CEO of Tesla said that Chinese workers

The Tesla CEO said Chinese workers “strongly believe in manufacturing” and praised his industry.

Last month, staff at Tesla’s Shanghai Gigafactory fell asleep on the job as production resumed after a three-week shutdown, according to reports. Bloomberg.

The factory began operating as a ‘closed-loop system to prevent further closures caused by China’s draconian Zero Covid policy’.

The workers were given a sleeping bag and mattress and a part of the factory floor to sleep on.

Each employee was provided with food for about $63 a day, but they were expected to work 12 hours a day, with one day off every six days.

Before the temporary measures were imposed, staff worked eight-hour shifts with four days on and two days off.

Rows of Chinese workers produce bags at a textile factory in Huaibei, east China's Anhui province.

Rows of Chinese workers produce bags at a textile factory in Huaibei, east China’s Anhui province.

Before Shanghai’s lockdown on March 28, the Gigafactory was churning out 2,000 cars a day and making half of the vehicles the company delivered worldwide last year.

Last year, the world’s richest man said he sleeps just six hours a night as he juggles his portfolio of multi-million dollar businesses.

“I work a lot,” Musk told podcaster Joe Rogan.

‘Normally, I’ll be in meetings at work until 1 or 2 in the morning. Saturday [and] Sunday, usually not, but sometimes.

“I tried to sleep less, but then total productivity goes down,” he said.

‘I don’t find myself wanting to sleep more than six [hours].’

Musk has developed a reputation as a workaholic. In 2018, Tesla employees told Business Insider that they frequently saw their sleeping boss huddled under tables, desks, and even on the factory floor.

Last month, staff at Tesla's Shanghai Gigafactory (pictured) fell asleep on the job as production resumed after a three-week shutdown.

Last month, staff at Tesla’s Shanghai Gigafactory (pictured) fell asleep on the job as production resumed after a three-week shutdown.

The factory (in the photo) began to operate as a

The factory (pictured) began operating as a “closed-loop system to prevent further closures caused by China’s draconian Zero Covid policy.”

“It’s here all the time,” Miguel Carrera, a manufacturing technology leader, told Business Insider.

I know people have seen him sleeping on the floor under a desk.

“All of a sudden, everyone is walking out and you look around and someone is huddled under the desk, you find out it’s Elon.”

In November 2018, he told the Recode Decode podcast that during Tesla’s efforts to increase production of its Model 3 sedan, he found himself constantly working.

“There were times when, some weeks … I haven’t exactly counted, but I slept a few hours, worked, slept a few hours, worked, seven days a week,” he said.

‘Some of those [weeks] must have been 120 hours or something crazy.’

Musk acknowledged that his crazy work schedule had “burned up a lot of brain cells.”

In 2018, he told Axios: ‘No one should put so many hours into your work.

‘[It’s] not recommended for anyone. You’re going to go a little crazy if you work 120 hours a week.

Before Shanghai's lockdown on March 28, the Gigafactory was churning out 2,000 cars a day and making half of the vehicles the company delivered worldwide last year.

Before Shanghai’s lockdown on March 28, the Gigafactory was churning out 2,000 cars a day and making half of the vehicles the company delivered worldwide last year.

Yesterday, it was revealed that US regulators are investigating Musk’s purchase of the largest individual holding in Twitter after he was late in reporting the purchase and thus failed to provide enough warning that it was coming. a public takeover bid.

The investigation, currently in its early stages, could spark a firestorm between the mercurial entrepreneur and financial regulators, just as Musk is trying to close his purchase of Twitter, approved on April 26.

It also comes amid frantic speculation about what the world’s richest man will do to Twitter once he takes the reins.

He said this week that he would allow Donald Trump back on Twitter, in line with his earlier statements that he planned to err on the side of free speech rather than bans and censorship.

On Wednesday, Jack Dorsey, co-founder and former CEO, also denied recent speculation that he had been brought back to run the Musk-owned company.

With the deal to make Twitter private expected to take two to three months to finalize, speculation is mounting about what Musk will do.

The 50-year-old’s first move to buy Twitter was buying a 9.2 percent stake in the tech company in mid-February.

Elon Musk is under investigation by the SEC, according to the Wall Street Journal, after he failed to disclose his purchase of Twitter stock as required by law within five days.

Elon Musk is under investigation by the SEC, according to the Wall Street Journal, after he failed to disclose his purchase of Twitter stock as required by law within five days.

Musk bought his 9.2 percent stake in mid-February but did not reveal it until April 4.  The value skyrocketed, though it's been a roller coaster ride ever since.

Musk bought his 9.2 percent stake in mid-February but did not reveal it until April 4. The value skyrocketed, though it’s been a roller coaster ride ever since.

But he did not disclose his purchase to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) until at least 10 days later, on April 4.

Any investor crossing a 5 percent stake must file a form with the SEC within 10 days. It serves as an early signal to stakeholders that a large investor might try to take over the company.

Musk’s April 4 presentation also characterized his involvement as passive, meaning he did not plan to take over Twitter or influence its management or business.

The next day, however, he was offered a position on Twitter’s board, and a couple of weeks later, the world’s richest man had closed a $44 billion deal to buy the social media giant.

Jack Dorsey, pictured testifying before Congress in March 2021, has denied that he wants to take over as Twitter CEO again.

Jack Dorsey, pictured testifying before Congress in March 2021, has denied that he wants to take over as Twitter CEO again.

The SEC investigation was first reported Wednesday by The Wall Street Journal.

Musk, known for his candid Twitter posts, has a long history of skirmishes with the SEC.

More recently, he was criticized by a US judge for trying to escape a settlement with the SEC that required oversight of his Tesla tweets.

In April, Information reported that the Federal Trade Commission is investigating whether Musk violated a law that requires companies and individuals to report certain material transactions to antitrust enforcement agencies.

Dorsey, who stepped down as chief executive in November, succeeded by Parag Agrawal, has been broadly supportive of Musk’s moves and has been consulting with him on the direction of the company; more recently, he confirmed that he and Musk discussed reinstating Trump and agreed to it. It was the right thing.

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