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Elderly ‘victim of the coronavirus’ who has trouble breathing when the nurse rescued him from a car accident has died

A 73-year-old man has died of coronavirus after being taken to hospital by a psychiatric nurse, on whose car he crashed while making a desperate attempt to get isolated food after ten days.

The older man, uncredited, was delirious and gray-faced when he hit cars on Thursday night with Lucy Duncan, 24, a mental health nurse from Atherton, Lancashire.

Sweating with the symptoms of the coronavirus, the man told Mrs. Duncan that he hadn’t eaten for ten days and thought he had the virus, grabbing her arm while taking care of him.

The elderly man, uncredited, was delirious when he bumped cars with Lucy Duncan, 24, (photo) a mental health nurse from Atherton, Lancashire, on Thursday night

The older man, uncredited, was delirious when he bumped cars with Lucy Duncan, 24, (photo) a mental health nurse from Atherton, Lancashire, on Thursday night

Ms. Duncan, who had just finished a 12-hour shift at the North West Boroughs NHS Trust and lacked full protective equipment, called an ambulance and stayed with the man for five hours while he fought for CPR to breathe.

During lucid moments, he told her that he had no family except a son with whom he had not spoken for years and that he had not eaten for 10 days through self-isolation.

The kind-hearted nurse is now trying to track down the man’s son who is believed to be in Milton Keynes, whom the older gentleman had asked her to track down before his death.

Lucy drove her Fiat 500X home from Wigan’s infirmary on Thursday evening (March 26) at around 7:45 PM when she saw a red Vauxhall Corsa coming in the opposite direction.

Lucy said, “I could see he was driving to the wrong side of the road and as we passed the front of his car hit the side of mine.

Lucy drove her Fiat 500X home from Wigan's infirmary on Thursday evening (March 26) at around 7:45 p.m. when she collided with Mr. Red Vauxhall Corsa

Lucy drove her Fiat 500X home from Wigan's infirmary on Thursday evening (March 26) at around 7:45 p.m. when she collided with Mr. Red Vauxhall Corsa

Lucy drove her Fiat 500X home from Wigan’s infirmary on Thursday evening (March 26) at around 7:45 p.m. when she collided with Mr. Red Vauxhall Corsa

“I wasn’t hurt, just shocked. I turned the car around and thought it had stopped, but actually it was very slow.

“I followed him and he turned into School Street and stopped.

“It was dark in the back of houses, and I suppose I should have been more careful, but the adrenalin was going up and when I approached the car I saw that he was an older man.”

Lucy offered to help the affected retiree, who she said was “gray and sweaty.”

She added, “He was in bad shape. He also had trouble talking and breathing. He took my arms and I leaned over to him and he said, “I’m sorry, but I think I have coronavirus.”

“He was really confused and drifted in and out of consciousness.

“When he was on the alert, he seemed more concerned about the car damage and assured me that he had comprehensive insurance.

“I told him that I was more concerned about him than the cars and that he needed an ambulance. I went to my car and luckily had a mask with me, but no personal protective equipment.

“He had gone out in his car to get something to eat and get, because he knew he was going to die without them. He said he didn’t trust other people because there were a lot of terrible people in the world. ‘

The ambulance arrived and took the man to the hospital with Lucy in her car.

She stayed there for several hours while undergoing several tests, including one that showed his lungs were only 50 percent active.

After his death, Lucy told the BBC, “He asked me if I would help him get in touch with his son … it’s something I will do my utmost to do for him,” she explained.

He was “almost surprised when I went back to him [in the hospital]”.

“Every time I went back and held his hand, his eyes lit up. It was great to be part of his life. ‘

Lucy was now isolating herself for the next two weeks, which meant her mother, brother and his girlfriend had to leave the family home.

She shared the tragic story on Facebook in a post that was shared over 30,000 times and received over 125,000 likes.

Thousands of benefactors told Lucy that she is a “hero” for what she did out of service.

Lucy said she was “overwhelmed” by the response, adding, “What people have said has been great and I’ve been crying.

“But I really don’t think anyone else would have done anything else if they had been in my situation.”

Simon Barber, Chief Executive at North West Boroughs Healthcare, said, “Lucy’s story is absolutely fantastic. It brought a tear to my eye.

“I’ve spoken to her before to say a huge thank you and personally do you good and she really is the most genuinely caring person.

I’m not surprised that she’s overwhelmed with all the statements of support – it’s incredibly incredible how much attention has drawn her social media post.

“Me and the rest of North West Boroughs Healthcare are so proud of Lucy’s quick thinking and selfless actions to help someone in need.

“She’s everything we want our employees to be.”

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