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EFL clubs are fearing a ‘catastrophic’ winter with soaring energy costs and World Cup football on TV

EFL clubs fear ‘catastrophic’ winter with soaring energy costs and World Cup football on TV as they face another crisis after barely surviving the Covid-19 pandemic… as Shrewsbury Town owner reveals bills is set to DOUBLE

  • League One and League Two clubs face a tough winter with soaring energy costs
  • Electricity bills in Shrewsbury are expected to rise from £100,000 to £200,000
  • The club lost an estimated £2.5m in the two and a half years under Covid
  • CEO Brian Caldwell suspects that the midday start idea is not the solution
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Clubs in League One and Two fear a ‘catastrophic’ winter ahead as skyrocketing energy costs combine with World Cup football on TV and punish them before their finances begin to recover from the pandemic.

“I don’t know how some clubs survived Covid and now comes another crisis with the rising utility bills,” Shrewsbury Town chief executive Brian Caldwell told Sportsmail.

“Rising costs are a concern. Our electricity bill will probably double, it’s quiet scary and the same problems are affecting supporters.

‘What if a football ticket becomes a luxury that some cannot afford? What if they decide to save £22 on a match ticket?

‘When the increased energy costs kick in, it will be October and November when the World Cup starts and there will be three or four matches a day live on TV.

“Do they want to come out and watch Shrewsbury three times a month? That would be disastrous for clubs in League One and Two, where matchday revenue can represent 40-50 per cent of turnover.

Clubs in League One and Two fear a 'catastrophic' winter ahead with soaring energy costs
Clubs in League One and Two fear a 'catastrophic' winter ahead with soaring energy costs

Clubs in League One and Two fear a ‘catastrophic’ winter ahead with soaring energy costs

There are also fears that the World Cup in 2022, which is on TV every day, could affect the club's audience
There are also fears that the World Cup in 2022, which is on TV every day, could affect the club's audience

There are also fears that the World Cup in 2022, which is on TV every day, could affect the club’s audience

‘Football is flooded with money, clubs are on their knees and going from one crisis to another.’

League One club Shrewsbury Town lost an estimated £2.5m in the two and a half years since the first closure. The conference portion of the business at the stadium, which accounted for 20 percent of revenue, is still nowhere near pre-pandemic levels.

The power bill is expected to rise this season from £80,000-£100,000 a year to £160,000-£200,000 a year and Caldwell suspects the idea of ​​bringing kick-offs to midday is not the solution in the EFL.

Shrewsbury Town CEO Brian Caldwell revealed that the electricity bill looks set to double in cost
Shrewsbury Town CEO Brian Caldwell revealed that the electricity bill looks set to double in cost

Shrewsbury Town CEO Brian Caldwell revealed that the electricity bill looks set to double in cost

Early kick-offs will mean more overnight trips at a time when hoteliers are passing on their increased costs to their customers.

A night in a hotel for Shrewsbury’s squad would typically cost £2,000 to £3,000 last season, but now costs more than £4,000 and up to £6,000 in London. “Yes, we wanted to save on electricity, but we wanted to rob Peter to pay Paul,” Caldwell said.

The most obvious savings can be made in the playing budget, but clubs are also trying to stave off the threat of relegation as core funding falls by £500,000 to around £1m. with a drop from League One to League Two. It almost disappears with a drop in the National League.

It is a bleak outlook for many clubs in the EFL with the only quick fix in the form of more funding packages from the Premier League and help from the government.

EFL clubs meet on Thursday when safety is sure to be high on the agenda.

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