Eerie sounds emitted between Saturn and his moon Enceladus

Nearly ten months have passed since the Casinni space probe plummeted on Saturn's surface, however, it continues to unlock the secrets of its host. The experts used instruments on board the probe condemned in its last days to analyze the plasma waves emanating from the gas giant

A mysterious chorus of spooky celestial sounds has been found hidden in strange signals picked up by a Saturn space probe condemned in its last days.

As the Cassini Saturn orbiter plunged closer and closer to the surface of its host planet, experts used onboard instruments to analyze the energy waves.

They recorded for the first time the patterns created by the plasma, a charged and hot gas, which passed between Saturn and its sixth largest moon, Enceladus.

The experts noticed that the vibration signals looked incredibly similar to the sound waves, and decided to use the recordings to create an audio file that could be heard.

What this revealed was a strange "whistling" sound, something reminiscent of a jet engine flying overhead.

The experts used the Radio Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument aboard Cassini to discover a surprisingly powerful and constantly changing interaction between Saturn and Enceladus.

His observations showed for the first time that waves travel in magnetic field lines that connect Saturn directly with Enceladus.

The magnetic field lines they found are like an electrical circuit between the two bodies, with energy flowing back and forth.

Cassini also detected electromagnetic waves in the audio frequency range and scientists were able to amplify and reproduce those signals through a loudspeaker.

The recording time was compressed from 16 minutes to 28.5 seconds.

"Enceladus is this small generator that revolves around Saturn, and we know it is a continuous source of energy," said Ali Sulaiman, a planetary scientist at the University of Iowa who was involved in the study and a member of the RPWS team.

"Now we find that Saturn responds by sending signals in the form of plasma waves, through the circuit of magnetic field lines that connect it to Enceladus hundreds of thousands of miles away."

Nearly ten months have passed since the Casinni space probe plummeted on Saturn's surface, however, it continues to unlock the secrets of its host. The experts used instruments on board the probe condemned in its last days to analyze the plasma waves emanating from the gas giant

Nearly ten months have passed since the Casinni space probe plummeted on Saturn's surface, however, it continues to unlock the secrets of its host. The experts used instruments on board the probe condemned in its last days to analyze the plasma waves emanating from the gas giant

They used Cassini to convert plasma wave recordings into an audio file that we can hear, in the same way that a radio translates electromagnetic waves into music. What this revealed was a strange "whistling" sound, something reminiscent of a jet engine that was flying very close by.

Like air or water, plasma, the fourth state of matter, a hot, charged gas, generates waves to carry energy.

The RPWS instrument aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft recorded intense plasma waves during one of its closest encounters with Saturn.

The recording was captured on September 2, 2017, two weeks before Cassini deliberately submerged in Saturn's atmosphere.

Enceladus is the sixth largest moon of Saturn, with 313 miles wide (504 km).

The interaction of Saturn and Enceladus is different from the relationship between Earth and its Moon.

Enceladus is immersed in Saturn's magnetic field and is geologically active, emitting columns of water vapor that ionize and fill Saturn's environment.

Enceladus (close-up), captured in this image of Cassini, is the sixth largest moon of Saturn (background), 313 miles wide. Enceladus is immersed in Saturn's magnetic field and is geologically active, emitting water vapor that ionizes and fills the environment around Saturn.

Enceladus (close-up), captured in this image of Cassini, is the sixth largest moon of Saturn (background), 313 miles wide. Enceladus is immersed in Saturn's magnetic field and is geologically active, emitting water vapor that ionizes and fills the environment around Saturn.

Enceladus (close-up), captured in this image of Cassini, is the sixth largest moon of Saturn (background), 313 miles wide. Enceladus is immersed in Saturn's magnetic field and is geologically active, emitting water vapor that ionizes and fills the environment around Saturn.

WHAT IS ENCELADUS AND COULD HAVE SOMETHING FOREIGN LIFE?

Enceladus (pictured) is Saturn's sixth largest moon, 313 miles wide (504 kilometers)

Enceladus (pictured) is Saturn's sixth largest moon, 313 miles wide (504 kilometers)

Enceladus (pictured) is Saturn's sixth largest moon, 313 miles wide (504 kilometers)

Enceladus is the sixth largest moon of Saturn, with 313 miles wide (504 kilometers).

It is an icy satellite with hydrothermal activity, an unusual combination, with vents spewing water vapor and ice particles from a global ocean buried beneath the icy crust of the moon.

It is believed that a handful of worlds have oceans of liquid water beneath their frozen shell, but only Enceladus throws his ocean into space, where a spacecraft can sample it.

According to NASA observations, the plume includes organic compounds, volatile gases, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, salts and silica.

The microbes on our planet produce these compounds or use them for growth, which leads some to speculate that tiny organisms live in the hidden ocean of Enceladus.

This means that while Enceladus may seem "inhospitable" like the other moons of Saturn, it is a prime candidate in our search for extraterrestrial life.

The waves of energy that move outward from Saturn to its rings and its moon Enceladus are responsible for a mysterious choir of celestial music, a new study shows. The experts converted plasma wave recordings (in the image) into an audio file & # 39; whooshing & # 39; what can we hear

The waves of energy that move outward from Saturn to its rings and its moon Enceladus are responsible for a mysterious choir of celestial music, a new study shows. The experts converted plasma wave recordings (in the image) into an audio file & # 39; whooshing & # 39; what can we hear

The waves of energy that move outward from Saturn to its rings and its moon Enceladus are responsible for a mysterious choir of celestial music, a new study shows. The experts converted plasma wave recordings (in the image) into an audio file & # 39; whooshing & # 39; what can we hear

It is believed that a handful of worlds have oceans of liquid water beneath their frozen shell, but only Enceladus throws his ocean into space, where a spacecraft can sample it.

According to NASA observations, the plume includes organic compounds, volatile gases, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, salts and silica.

The microbes on our planet produce these compounds or use them for growth, which leads some to speculate that tiny organisms live in the hidden ocean of Enceladus.

This means that while Enceladus may seem "inhospitable" like the other moons of Saturn, it is a prime candidate in our search for extraterrestrial life.

Our own Moon does not interact in the same way with Earth. Similar interactions take place between Saturn and its rings, since they are also very dynamic.

The full findings were published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

WHAT DISCOVERED CASSINI DURING HIS 20 YEAR MISSION IN SPACE?

Cassini launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida in 1997, then spent seven years in transit followed by 13 years orbiting Saturn.

The impression of an artist from the Cassini spacecraft studying Saturn

The impression of an artist from the Cassini spacecraft studying Saturn

The impression of an artist from the Cassini spacecraft studying Saturn

In 2000 he spent six months studying Jupiter before arriving at Saturn in 2004.

In that time, he discovered six more moons around Saturn, three-dimensional structures that rose above Saturn's rings, and a giant storm that lashed the entire planet for almost a year.

On December 13, 2004 he made his first flyby of the moons of Saturn, Titan and Dione.

On December 24, he launched the Huygens probe built by the European Space Agency on Saturn's moon Titan to study its atmosphere and surface composition.

There he discovered mysterious lakes of hydrocarbons made of ethane and methane.

In 2008, Cassini completed its primary mission to explore the Saturn system and began its mission of extension (the Cassini Equinox Mission).

In 2010 he began his second mission (Cassini Solstice Mission) that lasted until it exploded in Saturn's atmosphere.

In December 2011, Cassini obtained the highest resolution images of Saturn's moon, Enceladus.

In December of the following year he traced the transit of Venus to test the feasibility of observing planets outside our solar system.

In March 2013, Cassini made the last flyby of Saturn's moon, Rhea, and measured its internal structure and its gravitational pull.

Cassini not only studied Saturn, but also captured incredible views of its many moons. In the image above, you can see the moon of Saturn, Enceladus, drifting in front of the rings and the tiny moon Pandora. He was captured on November 1, 2009, with the whole scene illuminated by the sun.

Cassini not only studied Saturn, but also captured incredible views of its many moons. In the image above, you can see the moon of Saturn, Enceladus, drifting in front of the rings and the tiny moon Pandora. He was captured on November 1, 2009, with the whole scene illuminated by the sun.

Cassini not only studied Saturn, but also captured incredible views of its many moons. In the image above, you can see the moon of Saturn, Enceladus, drifting in front of the rings and the tiny moon Pandora. He was captured on November 1, 2009, with the whole scene illuminated by the sun.

In July of that year, Cassini captured a Saturn illuminated in black to examine the rings in small details and also captured an image of the Earth.

In April of this year he completed his closest flyby to Titan and began his Grand Final orbit that ended on September 15.

"The mission has changed the way we think about where life may have evolved beyond our Earth," said Andrew Coates, head of the Planetary Science Group at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory at University College London.

"In addition to Mars, external planetary moons such as Enceladus, Europa and even Titan are now the main contenders for life elsewhere," he added. "We have completely rewritten the textbooks about Saturn."

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