Ebola takes four more lives as the death toll reaches 82 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

At least 122 people have been infected with Ebola in the outbreak in North Kivu region, in the northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo since it was first declared on August 1: the city of Beni has been the center of the outbreak current

Ebola has killed 82 people in an outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Four more people have died since Monday and 11 new cases have been reported since August 28, reports the World Health Organization (WHO).

In a desperate attempt to contain the outbreak, aid workers have educated nearly 2.5 million people on how to reduce the risk of lethal virus spreading.

But officials admitted that it is increasingly difficult to trace where the infection is being transmitted because the outbreak is near a dangerous conflict zone.

On Saturday, September 1, it marked one month since the outbreak began and 122 cases of Ebola have been reported, 91 of them confirmed.

Nearly 70 percent of people believed to have been infected have died of the disease, but DRC health officials are implementing experimental drugs to treat patients, and at least two people have recovered after treatment. .

The latest WHO situation report on the outbreak, published yesterday, said that "recent trends suggest that control measures are working."

At least 122 people have been infected with Ebola in the outbreak in North Kivu region, in the northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo since it was first declared on August 1: the city of Beni has been the center of the outbreak current

At least 122 people have been infected with Ebola in the outbreak in North Kivu region, in the northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo since it was first declared on August 1: the city of Beni has been the center of the outbreak current

A patient with Ebola is treated by medical professionals in Beni: since the beginning of the outbreak, it is believed that some 4,296 people have come into contact with people who had the virus and 16 medical workers have been infected.

A patient with Ebola is treated by medical professionals in Beni: since the beginning of the outbreak, it is believed that some 4,296 people have come into contact with people who had the virus and 16 medical workers have been infected.

A patient with Ebola is treated by medical professionals in Beni: since the beginning of the outbreak, it is believed that some 4,296 people have come into contact with people who had the virus and 16 medical workers have been infected.

The Ebola virus is spreading near the city of Beni, in the region of North Kivu, in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, near the border with Uganda.

About 16 health workers have contracted the virus and one has died because of it.

Since the outbreak began, authorities have identified 4,296 people who have been in contact with those who contracted the virus. More than half of those people are still being monitored.

And the country's efforts to prevent the outbreak from spiraling out of control have been hailed as a "first global and a ray of hope" by WHO.

UNICEF said this week that it has now reached 2,454,000 people with its Ebola prevention messages in the last month.

"A growing number of communities now know Ebola and how to prevent its transmission," said Dr. Gianfranco Rotigliano, UNICEF representative.

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CURRENT EBOLA OUTBREAK OF THE CONGO IN NUMBERS

122 Ebola cases have been reported

91 of those cases are confirmed

31 they are probable cases & # 39; of Ebola

82 people have died from the virus

62 of cases have been in women

sixteen Health workers have caught Ebola

One health worker as he died

4,296 people have been in contact with patients with Ebola

2,454,000 people have been contacted by UNICEF Ebola prevention messages

11 million people live in the northern provinces of Kivu and Ituri in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where the outbreak is occurring

Source: World Health Organization

"The active participation of affected communities is key to stopping the spread of the disease.

"We are working closely with them to promote hand washing and good hygiene practices, and to identify and help people who might be infected with the virus."

At-risk populations are reached through community participation, radio, door-to-door activities, church meetings and groups of adolescents, and prevention messages are shared in four different languages.

Last Friday, the WHO said there are still "substantial risks" to try to beat the Ebola outbreak in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The UN agency said that although efforts to stop the spread of the virus are working, it is proving difficult to keep track of where the virus is active.

Four of 13 recent cases in the city of Beni were not previously identified as contacts of other patients, which means that officials do not know how they were exposed to Ebola.

An important part of preventing the spread of the virus is to monitor people who have been in contact with other people infected with the fever, to ensure that they do not develop symptoms and spread the infection.

If people develop the infection without coming in contact with previous patients, it could mean that the virus comes from another place.

This makes it more difficult for health workers to track and contain all sources of rapidly spreading disease.

WHO also reports "sporadic cases" of high-risk behaviors such as unsafe burials, which could worsen the outbreak because Ebola can still be trapped in cadavers.

Some 82 people have died in the most recent outbreak of Ebola that is taking place in North Kivu province, in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In the image: health workers carry the body of a presumed victim last Wednesday, August 22 in Mangina, a town near Beni.

Some 82 people have died in the most recent outbreak of Ebola that is taking place in North Kivu province, in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In the image: health workers carry the body of a presumed victim last Wednesday, August 22 in Mangina, a town near Beni.

Some 82 people have died in the most recent outbreak of Ebola that is taking place in North Kivu province, in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In the image: health workers carry the body of a presumed victim last Wednesday, August 22 in Mangina, a town near Beni.

But there are rays of hope for the troubled African country: two infected patients have recovered after receiving an experimental therapeutic drug.

The UN health agency said in a statement that most of the patients recently admitted to Ebola clinics received experimental treatments and that many case contacts have been immunized with a new vaccine.

More than 3,400 people received medicines and experts say that the medical assault of the Democratic Republic of the Congo on the infection is a "world first."

Two of the first 10 people who received an experimental cure known as mAb114 recovered from the deadly infection.

In a statement, the Ministry of Health of the Democratic Republic of the Congo confirmed: "These two people are among the first 10 patients to receive the therapeutic molecule mAb114."

Developed in the USA UU., MAb114 was the first of five experimental treatments that DRC began using in the outbreak.

The Ministry of Health has confirmed that four other experimental drugs have been approved for use in the country: ZMapp, Remdesivir, Favipiravir and Regn3450-3471-347.

The World Health Organization said the country's attempts to stop the virus were "a global first and a ray of hope for people with the disease."

The mayor of the city of Beni, Jean Edmond Nyonyi Masumbuko Bwanakawa, has announced that treatment for Ebola will be free in the region for three months.

He hopes the measure will encourage people to seek immediate medical help and not be intimidated by the fear of having to pay for medical care.

An Ebola patient is reviewed by two medical workers after being admitted to a Biosegura Emergency Care Unit (CUBE) in Beni, Democratic Republic of the Congo

An Ebola patient is reviewed by two medical workers after being admitted to a Biosegura Emergency Care Unit (CUBE) in Beni, Democratic Republic of the Congo

An Ebola patient is reviewed by two medical workers after being admitted to a Biosegura Emergency Care Unit (CUBE) in Beni, Democratic Republic of the Congo

The current Ebola outbreak is the tenth to attack the Congo since 1976, when the virus was first identified and the name of the Ebola River in the north of the country.

The outbreak was announced a few days after another was declared in the northwest of the Congo in early August.

However, the new outbreak has already eclipsed the one that emerged earlier this summer and has fueled more fears among the medical community.

Virologists feared it would be "reminiscent" of the 2014 Ebola pandemic, which decimated West Africa and killed 11,000 people.

There is also concern that the conflict in the region could hinder the control of the outbreak, since the infected could be moved to refugee camps where the virus can thrive.

Help workers have been told they will have to navigate their response among more than 100 armed groups.

A WHO spokesperson said: This is an area of ​​active conflict. The main barrier will be to access the affected population safely. "

WHAT IS EBOLA AND HOW MORTAL IS IT?

Ebola, a hemorrhagic fever, killed at least 11,000 worldwide after it decimated West Africa and expanded rapidly within two years.

That pandemic was officially declared in January 2016, when Liberia was announced as free of Ebola by WHO.

The country, shaken by consecutive civil wars that ended in 2003, was the most affected by the fever, with 40 percent of the deaths occurring there.

Sierra Leone reported the largest number of cases of Ebola, and almost all those infected were residents of the nation.

WHERE DID IT BEGIN?

An analysis, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that the outbreak began in Guinea, which is near Liberia and Sierra Leone.

A team of international researchers managed to track the pandemic until it reached a two-year-old boy in Meliandou, about 400 miles (650 km) from the capital, Conakry.

Emile Ouamouno, better known as Patient Zero, may have contracted the deadly virus by playing with bats in a hollow tree, a study suggested.

How many people were demolished?

WHAT WERE THE COUNTRIES ABLEDGED BY EBOLA DURING THE 2014-16 PANDEMIC? (Figures from CDC)
COUNTRY CASES DEATHS DEATH RATE (%)
GUINEA 3,814 2,544 66.7%
SIERRA LEONE 14,124 3,956 28.0%
LIBERIA 10,678 4.810 45.0%
NIGERIA twenty 8 40.0%
SENEGAL 1 0 N / A
SPAIN 1 0 N / A
US 4 1 25.0%
MALI 8 6 75.0%
United Kingdom 1 0 N / A
ITALY 1 0 N / A

The figures show that almost 29,000 people were infected with Ebola, which means that the virus killed around 40 percent of those affected.

Cases and deaths were also reported in Nigeria, Mali and the United States, but on a much smaller scale, with 15 deaths among the three nations.

Health officials in Guinea reported a mysterious error in the southeastern regions of the country before the WHO confirmed that it was Ebola.

Ebola was first identified by scientists in 1976, but the most recent outbreak eclipsed all others recorded in history, according to the figures.

HOW HUMANS COULD HAVE THE VIRUS?

Scientists believe that Ebola is most often transmitted to humans by frugivorous bats, but you can also blame antelopes, porcupines, gorillas and chimpanzees.

It can be transmitted between humans through the blood, secretions and other bodily fluids of people and surfaces that have become infected.

IS THERE A TREATMENT?

The WHO warns that "there is no proven treatment" for Ebola, but dozens of drugs and punctures are being tested in the case of a similarly devastating outbreak.

However, there is hope, after an experimental vaccine, called rVSV-ZEBOV, which protected almost 6,000 people. The results were published in The Lancet magazine.

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