Eating 76g of red and processed meat STILL increases the risk of colon cancer

Eating moderate amounts of ham, bacon and red meat still increases the risk of colon cancer, a large study suggests.

Scientists compared the risk between people who adhere to the NHS guidelines for red and processed meat consumption – 70g per day – and those who don't.

They found that those who eat more than recommended have a fifth higher risk of colon cancer compared to those who eat smaller amounts.

Researchers led by a team at the University of Oxford followed nearly six hundred thousand people for nearly six years.

About 2,609 of the participants – who were between 40 and 69 years old at the start of the study – developed colon cancer, which is more common in the elderly.

Scientists compared the risk between people who adhere to the NHS guidelines for red and processed meat consumption - 70g per day - and those who don't

Scientists compared the risk between people who adhere to the NHS guidelines for red and processed meat consumption – 70g per day – and those who don't

The study found that people who consume an average of 76 g of red and processed meat per day had a higher risk for those who ate 21 g or less per day.

For red meat, the risk was about 15 percent higher for people who ate 54g a day – a lamb chop, compared to those who had 8g a day.

Only for processed meat was the risk 19 percent higher for those who ate 29 g per day – a slice of bacon, compared to those who ate about 5 g per day.

Existing evidence indicates a higher colon cancer risk for every 50 g of processed meat that a person eats per day.

But the new study found that the risk increases by only 25 g per day – a third of what the average daily intake is.

Professor Tim Key is co-author of the research and is deputy director of the cancer epidemiology unit at the University of Oxford.

WHAT IS CANCEL FILE?

Colon or colon cancer affects the colon, which consists of the colon and rectum.

Such tumors usually develop from pre-cancerous growths, the so-called polyps.

Symptoms include:

  • Bleeding from the bottom
  • Blood in stool
  • A bowel change of at least three weeks
  • Inexplicable weight loss
  • Extreme unexplained fatigue
  • Stomach ache

Most cases have no clear cause, but people are more at risk if they:

  • Are older than 50
  • Have a family history of the condition
  • Have a personal history of polyps in their gut
  • Suffers from inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease
  • Lead an unhealthy lifestyle

Treatment usually includes surgery and chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

More than nine out of 10 people with colon cancer from colon cancer survive five years or more after their diagnosis.

This drops considerably if it is diagnosed in later stages.

According to figures from Bowel Cancer UK, more than 41,200 people are diagnosed with colon cancer every year in the UK.

It affects around 40 per 100,000 adults a year in the US, according to the National Cancer Institute.

He said the results reduced the substantial evidence associated with eating too much red and processed meat at an increased risk of colon cancer.

Professor Key added: & # 39; Most previous research looked at people in the 1990s or earlier and the diets have changed considerably since then.

WHO SAYS THAT RED MEAT INCREASES THE RISK OF COOKING CANCER?

Red meat – such as beef and lamb – & # 39; probably increases your risk of colon cancer & # 39 ;, according to the NHS.

And processed meat – such as sausages and bacon – carries a similar risk.

The NHS and the American Institute of Cancer Research both recommend limiting our consumption to around 70 g (2.4 oz) per day.

These recommendations came about after the 2011 Iron and Health report of the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition concluded that red and processed meat is likely to increase the risk of colon cancer.

However, the report could not identify the exact amounts that are safe to eat.

The same survey found that the average British adult eats 70 grams of red meat per day.

The report & # 39; Food, nutrition, exercise and cancer prevention & # 39; of the World Cancer Research Fund in 2007 also said that the link between red meat and the disease & # 39; convincing & # 39; is.

The NHS therefore recommends people who eat 90 grams or more of red meat a day and reduce their intake to 70 grams.

Source: NHS

& # 39; So our study provides a more up-to-date insight that is relevant to today's meat consumption. & # 39;

The World Cancer Research Fund is already warning that there is strong evidence that eating processed meat causes colon cancer.

A series of studies conducted in recent years have established the link between the fatal disease and the regular eating of salami, bacon and ham.

Eating a lot of red meat, such as beef, lamb and pork, is also thought to increase the risk, according to the WCRF.

The World Health Organization classifies processed meat as carcinogenic and red meat that is probably carcinogenic.

In light of the evidence, the NHS and the American Institute of Cancer Research both advise that consumption is limited to around 70 g (2.4 oz) per day.

One slice of bacon typically weighs 31 g (1 oz), a sausage is approximately 66 g (2.3 oz) and a slice of ham 20 g (0.7 oz).

The latest study on meat and colon cancer, partially funded by Cancer Research UK, was published in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

Dr. Julie Sharp, CRUK & # 39; s chief health information, said: & # 39; The government guidelines for red and processed meat are general health advice.

& # 39; This study reminds you that the more you can reduce, the more you can reduce your chances of developing colon cancer.

& # 39; This does not necessarily mean that you have to completely cut red and processed meat, but you may want to think about simple ways to reduce how much you have and how often. & # 39;

Dr. Sharp added: “Although breaking down habits we've had for a long time can be difficult, it's never too late to make healthy changes to our diet.

& # 39; You could try to do meat-free Mondays, look for recipes with fresh chicken and fish, or trade meat for legumes such as beans and lentils in your usual meals. & # 39;

About 42,000 people are diagnosed with colon cancer in the UK every year, says Bowel Cancer UK.

And the deadly disease affects around 40 per 100,000 adults a year in the US, according to the National Cancer Institute.

WHAT WOULD A BALANCED DIET COULD LOOK LIKE?

Meals should be based on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, ideally whole grain, according to the NHS

Meals should be based on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, ideally whole grain, according to the NHS

Meals should be based on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, ideally whole grain, according to the NHS

• Eat at least 5 servings of a variety of fruits and vegetables every day. All fresh, frozen, dried and canned fruit and vegetables count

• Basic meals on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, ideally whole grain

• 30 grams of fiber per day: this is the same as eating all of the following: 5 servings of fruit and vegetables, 2 whole-grain breakfast cereal cookies, 2 thick slices of whole-grain bread and large baked potato with the skin on it

• Some dairy or dairy alternatives (such as soy drinks) opt for options for lower fat and lower sugars

• Eat beans, legumes, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins (including 2 portions of fish each week, one of which must be greasy)

• Choose unsaturated oils and lubricating oils and consume in small quantities

• Drink 6-8 cups / glasses of water per day

• Adults must have less than 6 g of salt and 20 g of saturated fat for women or 30 g for men per day

Source: NHS Eatwell Guide