Earthy planets can be used anywhere in the universe & # 39; just & # 39; to be

Earth-like planets can & # 39; simply & # 39; are: scientists see signs of rusting iron on space rocks pointing to worlds with the ingredients for life

  • Scientists said the rust process is the basis for all chemistry on Earth
  • These are the same chemical elements – iron and oxygen – that are found in rocks
  • The research & # 39; promises very well for the search for earthy planets in the universe & # 39;
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According to scientists, earthy planets can occur anywhere in the universe.

Researchers who have studied the chemistry of space rock from other galaxies say that the conditions for life on Earth are not unique.

They found signs of rusting on asteroids or planet fragments, showing that some of our building blocks also existed there.

Finding elements such as oxygen and iron, which they said form the basis of all chemistry on Earth, suggested that similar planets are there.

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Scientists say that finding signs that rust can form on rocks in other solar systems reinforces the hope of finding rocky planets that are similar to the Earth and could harbor life (stock image)

Scientists say that finding signs that rust can form on rocks in other solar systems reinforces the hope of finding rocky planets that are similar to the Earth and could harbor life (stock image)

Scientists from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) came up with their theory after doing chemistry tests in pieces of asteroids in a laboratory.

They discovered that oxygen reacted with iron to produce iron oxide – known to us as metal rust.

And this chemical reaction, known as oxidation, was essentially the starting point for life on earth.

& # 39; All chemistry that occurs on the Earth's surface can ultimately be traced back to the oxidation state of the planet, & # 39; said researcher professor Edward Young.

& # 39; The fact that we have oceans and all the ingredients needed for life can be traced back to the oxidizing planet as it is. The rocks dominate the chemistry. & # 39;

Water vapor was discovered last month on a & # 39; super-earth & # 39; at 110 light-years away that is estimated to be twice as large as the earth and eight times the mass. K2-18b (illustrated) also has an atmosphere and the right temperature range for living things, according to scientists from University College London
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Water vapor was discovered last month on a & # 39; super-earth & # 39; at 110 light-years away that is estimated to be twice as large as the earth and eight times the mass. K2-18b (illustrated) also has an atmosphere and the right temperature range for living things, according to scientists from University College London

Water vapor was discovered last month on a & # 39; super-earth & # 39; at 110 light-years away that is estimated to be twice as large as the earth and eight times the mass. K2-18b (illustrated) also has an atmosphere and the right temperature range for living things, according to scientists from University College London

An earthy planet called GJ 357d was discovered by NASA earlier this year. It revolves around a year around a star in the so-called habitable zone of the galaxy, an area far enough from its star not to be too hot

An earthy planet called GJ 357d was discovered by NASA earlier this year. It revolves around a year around a star in the so-called habitable zone of the galaxy, an area far enough from its star not to be too hot

An earthy planet called GJ 357d was discovered by NASA earlier this year. It revolves around a year around a star in the so-called habitable zone of the galaxy, an area far enough from its star not to be too hot

Planets that resemble ours are known to exist and are called exoplanets – those that orbit around a star in the same way that we do around the sun.

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But very little is known about the chemistry of the rocky planets and how similar they are to that of the earth.

EARTH PLANS MAY EXIST IN SOLAR SYSTEMS & # 39; & # 39; GOUDILOCKS ZONES & # 39; & # 39;

The habitable zone is the range of orbits around a star in which a planet can support liquid water.

This habitable zone is also called the "Goldilocks" zone, derived from the children's fairy tale.

The temperature of the star should be & # 39; just right & # 39; so that liquid water can exist on the surface.

The boundaries of the habitable zone are critical.

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If a planet is too close to its star, it will experience a runaway greenhouse effect, such as Venus.

But if it's too far, water will freeze, as seen on Mars.

Since the concept was first presented in 1953, many stars have been shown to have a Goldilocks region, and some of them have discovered one or more planets in this zone, such as & # 39; Kepler-186f & # 39 ;, in 2014.

The UCLA team theory comes just a month after a groundbreaking discovery of a & # 39; super earth & # 39; planet with 110 light-year-away water.

K2-18b is known to contain water vapor and is about twice as large as the earth and eight times as heavy.

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Researchers at University College London said in September that, with a year of only 33 days, the planet could come closest to a planet capable of harboring a life like ours.

Professor Young and his team suggest that planets like this can be much more common than is currently assumed.

They studied rocks and telescope data from galaxies that revolve around burnt-out white dwarf stars between 200 and 665 light-years of the Earth.

& # 39; We are studying geochemistry in rocks of other stars, which is almost unheard of & # 39 ;, said Professor Young.

His colleague Alexandra Doyle, a postgraduate student, said the rocks they studied & # 39; very similar & # 39; were with those found by scientists on Earth and Mars.

& # 39; They are earthy and Marsy in terms of their oxidized iron, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; We see that rocks are rocks everywhere, with very similar geophysics and geochemistry.

& # 39; It has always been a mystery why the rocks in our solar system have been so oxidized.

& # 39; It is not what you expect. The question was whether this would also apply to other stars. Our study says yes. That is very good for searching earth-like planets in the universe. & # 39;

One of the other researchers, Professor Hilke Schlichting, added: & # 39; If alien rocks have a similar amount of oxidation as the earth, then you can conclude that the planet has similar plate tectonics and a similar potential for magnetic fields as the earth , who are widely believed to be important ingredients for life.

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& # 39; This study is a leap forward in being able to make these conclusions for bodies outside our own solar system and indicates that it is highly likely that there are real earth analogues. & # 39;

The study was published in the journal Science.

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