Earth 2500: Shocking Images Reveal How The Amazon Will Be Barren And India Too Hot To Live In

Earth could be ALIEN to humans by 2,500: Shocking images show how the Amazon will be barren, the US Midwest tropical and India too hot to live in as CO2 emissions continue to rise

  • Canadian McGill University researchers have modeled future climates
  • The team considered three possible scenarios for reducing greenhouse gases
  • They illustrated the changes they predict with 2500 worst case scenario
  • The findings illustrate the importance of modeling after 2100, they said:










By the year 3000, in a song by the English pop band Busted, ‘not much has changed’, ‘but they live under water’. However, new climate forecasts paint a less rosy future.

If carbon dioxide emissions continue to rise, by 2,500 the Amazon will be barren, the American Midwest tropical and India too hot to live in.

Here’s the grim warning from a research team led by Canada’s McGill University, which has modeled future climates under three greenhouse gas reduction scenarios.

They then illustrated their worst-case scenarios — alongside sketches of life in AD 1500 and the present — to highlight how strange the future Earth could be.

The findings, they said, emphasize the importance of not stopping climate predictions at the 2100 benchmark, as usual, but also taking into account the ongoing effects.

Researchers led by McGill University have predicted that by 2,500 AD the Amazon will be barren, the US Midwest tropical and India too hot to live in. Pictured: The team’s illustrations of how rural India transitioned 521 years ago from a busy agricultural environment (top) to a more built-up landscape with infrastructure today (center) and finally what it might look like in a scenario by 2500 with a lot of greenhouse gases. Here, agriculture is carried out by autonomous robots, while humans need special protective clothing to survive the increased heat

HEALTHY MONUMENTS

This study isn’t the only one this week warning about the future effects of climate change on the world we know.

On Tuesday, experts released illustrations showing how landmarks like Buckingham Palace could be submerged by 2050 as sea levels rise.

In addition to the royal residence, other famous buildings under threat are the Brighton Palace Pier, the Houston Space Center in Texas, and the Sydney Opera House.

The study was conducted by environmental scientist Christopher Lyon of McGill University in Montreal and his colleagues.

“We need to envision the earth that our children and grandchildren may face, and what we can do now to make it just and livable for them,” said Dr. Lyons.

“If we don’t meet the targets of the Paris Agreement and emissions continue to rise, many places in the world will change dramatically.”

The researchers’ models showed that under low and medium global warming scenarios — which fail to meet the Paris Agreement’s goal of keeping global warming below 3.6°F (2°C) — the vegetation and crop growing areas will move towards the poles.

This leads to the risk that places with long histories of cultural and ecosystem riches, such as the Amazon basin, will eventually become barren. At the same time, the acreage suitable for growing many crops will also decrease.

Meanwhile, densely populated, current regions such as India will face extreme heat stress — and it could become so high that the areas become unsuitable for human habitation without the aid of special personal protective equipment.

Even under high greenhouse gas emissions scenarios, however, the team reports that they expect sea levels to continue to rise as a product of expanding and mixing water in warming oceans.

“These projections point to the potential magnitude of climate upheaval on longer timescales and fall within the range of assessments made by others,” said Dr. Lyons.

A high greenhouse gas future will risk that places with long histories of cultural and ecosystem richness, such as the Amazon Basin (pictured), will eventually become barren.  At the same time, the area suitable for the cultivation of many crops will also decrease

A high greenhouse gas future will risk that places with long histories of cultural and ecosystem richness, such as the Amazon Basin (pictured), will eventually become barren. At the same time, the area suitable for the cultivation of many crops will also decrease

“The Paris Agreement, the United Nations and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change scientific assessment reports show us all what we need to do before 2100 to achieve our goals, and what could happen if we don’t,” said Dr. Lyons.

“But this measure—which has been used for more than 30 years—is short-sighted, because people born today will not have passed 70 until 2100.”

The study’s full findings were published in the journal Global Change Biology.

“We need to envision the earth that our children and grandchildren may face, and what we can do now to make it just and livable for them,” said Dr. Lyons. “If we don’t meet the targets of the Paris Agreement and emissions continue to rise, many places in the world will change dramatically.” Pictured: the US Midwest in 1500 AD (with a diverse corn-based agriculture), in 2020 (with grain monoculture and large harvesters) and finally a high-emissions future, where the region has become tropical and agriculture is forced over to switch to oil palms and succulents in arid zones, provided by AI-powered drones and a significantly reduced human presence

THE PARIS AGREEMENT: A GLOBAL AGREEMENT TO LIMIT TEMPERATURE VOTING THROUGH CARBON EMISSION TARGETS

The Paris Agreement, first signed in 2015, is an international agreement to control and mitigate climate change.

It hopes to keep the rise in global average temperature below 2°C (3.6ºF) “and make efforts to limit the rise in temperature to 1.5°C (2.7°F)”.

It seems the more ambitious goal of limiting global warming to 1.5°C (2.7°F) may be more important than ever, according to previous research claiming 25 percent of the world will see a significant increase in drier climates. circumstances could see.

The Paris Agreement on Climate Change has four main goals in terms of reducing emissions:

1) A long-term goal to keep the increase in global average temperature well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels

2) Strive to limit the increase to 1.5°C as this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change

3) Governments agreed that global emissions should peak as soon as possible, recognizing that this will take longer for developing countries

4) To then make rapid reductions in accordance with the best available science

Source: European Commission

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