Eagle-eyed shopper sees a blunder on a water dispenser at & # 39; the world's largest Primark

Eagle-eyed shopper sees a blunder on a water dispenser at & # 39; the world's largest Primark – so, can YOU see the error?

  • Chemistry teacher Miss Keloglou, from Bath, saw a mistake in the formula of water
  • She admitted that not many people had picked up the scientific error
  • Fellow science teacher pointed out that gaffe suggested that hydrogen gas be distributed

A chemistry teacher saw a scientific blunder on a water dispenser in & # 39; the world's largest Primark.

Miss Keloglou, from Bath, discovered the error in an Instagram story posted by the seller with a photo of the fountain in the new store in central Birmingham, which was opened last week.

The dispensers, spread over the 160,000 m² building, claim & # 39; H20 is on the house & # 39 ;, and encourage customers to fill their own bottles of water while browsing the store.

However, the correct formula for water is H2O – with the letter & # 39; o & # 39 ;, an abbreviation for oxygen, as opposed to the number zero.

The water fountains, scattered around the 160,000 m² building, claim & # 39; H20 is on the house & # 39 ;, and encourage shoppers to refill their own water bottles as they browse the store.

The water fountains, scattered around the 160,000 m² building, claim & # 39; H20 is on the house & # 39 ;, and encourage shoppers to refill their own water bottles as they browse the store.

The new city branch of Birmingham in the center of Primark, which opened last week, is the largest in the world

The new city branch of Birmingham in the center of Primark, which opened last week, is the largest in the world

The new city branch of Birmingham in the center of Primark, which opened last week, is the largest in the world

Miss Keloglou stopped the funny surveillance and tweeted: & I think there is a love-hate relationship between Primark and the formula of water. Certainly not many people saw the error. #You had a task. & # 39;

Her tweet received 17 likes, but many Twitter users first struggled to understand what the problem was.

One explained in a response below: & # 39; It's a 0 [zero] not an O & # 39 ;, which encourages another to admit: & # 39; Ahhhh, I had been staring there for centuries and couldn't find out. & # 39;

A fellow teacher went one step further and joked that the wrong formula suggests that the water fountain emits H2, a gas that is created when two hydrogen atoms attach to each other and become a hydrogen molecule.

Miss Keloglou clocked the error on Primark's Instagram stories and tweeted: & I think there is a love-hate relationship between Primark and the formula of water. Certainly not many people saw the error. #You had a task & # 39;

Miss Keloglou clocked the error on Primark's Instagram stories and tweeted: & I think there is a love-hate relationship between Primark and the formula of water. Certainly not many people saw the error. #You had a task & # 39;

Miss Keloglou clocked the error on Primark's Instagram stories and tweeted: & I think there is a love-hate relationship between Primark and the formula of water. Certainly not many people saw the error. #You had a task & # 39;

A fellow Twitter user pointed out the error in one of the comments, much to the relief of those who failed to find out what was wrong

A fellow Twitter user pointed out the error in one of the comments, much to the relief of those who failed to find out what was wrong

A fellow Twitter user pointed out the error in one of the comments, much to the relief of those who failed to find out what was wrong

A fellow teacher went a step further and joked that the incorrect formula suggests that the water fountain emits H2, a gas that is created when two hydrogen atoms attach to each other and become a hydrogen molecule

A fellow teacher went a step further and joked that the incorrect formula suggests that the water fountain emits H2, a gas that is created when two hydrogen atoms attach to each other and become a hydrogen molecule

A fellow teacher went a step further and joked that the incorrect formula suggests that the water fountain emits H2, a gas that is created when two hydrogen atoms attach to each other and become a hydrogen molecule

He tweeted: & # 39; Technically does it produce hydrogen gas? Risky things … & # 39;

Miss Keloglou replied: & # 39; Oh, I didn't think about that! And what about the zero then? Could it be a subscript? H2O? A superscript? Degrees? Oh the questions. & # 39;

It is not the first scientific error she discovered in the budget-friendly retailer.

She previously tweeted a piece of Primark PS H2OHH facial cleansing wipes, subtitling the post: & # 39; Found an H4O molecule in the largest Primark in the world. & # 39;

Miss Keloglou also saw an unusual chemical formula on Primark's PS H2OHH facial cleansing wipes

Miss Keloglou also saw an unusual chemical formula on Primark's PS H2OHH facial cleansing wipes

Miss Keloglou also saw an unusual chemical formula on Primark's PS H2OHH facial cleansing wipes

It was not the only blunder to hit the brand new store. Hours after opening the doors to the public on Thursday, the store suffered a power outage, leaving customers in the darkness.

It killed the party mood when it cut off the music and froze the escalators for five minutes, making it difficult for customers to reach the higher levels.

The power outage was apparently caused by a problem in the city center, which also affected other stores in the area.

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