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Terry died in 2010 eight months after quitting smoking for e-cigarettes

Terry Miller believed the hype about vapen and it may have cost him his life.

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The 57-year-old from Gateshead exchanged his 20-day smoking habit for e-cigarettes – praised by British health officials and anti-smoking campaigners as the safer alternative – only to die from the lung lipoid pneumonia (when fat particles eight months later.

Doctors said oil from vaping fluid was found on his lungs.

Mr. Miller, who died in 2010, is considered to be the first British deadly deadly sheep. Although the coroner has pronounced an open verdict, his widow, Glynis, thinks he should have continued to smoke.

Terry died in 2010 eight months after quitting smoking for e-cigarettes

Mr. Miller's wife thinks he would have been better off if he had continued his 20-day smoking habit

Mr. Miller's wife thinks he would have been better off if he had continued his 20-day smoking habit

Terry Miller, pictured, died of the lung disease lipoid pneumonia and doctors said oil from evaporating fluid had been found on his lungs. His wife Glynis thinks he should have smoked better

Thirteen deaths and at least 805 other cases have been associated with vape in the US and Terry Miller, who died in 2010, is considered to be the first British lethal deadly vape (file photo)
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Thirteen deaths and at least 805 other cases have been associated with vape in the US and Terry Miller, who died in 2010, is considered to be the first British lethal deadly vape (file photo)

Thirteen deaths and at least 805 other cases have been associated with vape in the US and Terry Miller, who died in 2010, is considered to be the first British lethal deadly vape (file photo)

"He would have been sick, but he would have lasted much longer," she said. "Who says that vapen is safe? It cradles people in a false sense of security. & # 39;

Americans such as Adam Hergenreder hardly need to hear that. When the 18-year-old from Illinois was brought to the hospital in August with a severe sheep-related respiratory disease, his doctor told him that he had "the lungs of a 70-year-old."

Adam had started vaping at the age of 16. A year and a half later he was in intensive care. Doctors blamed vape.

Adam Hergenreder, 18, from Illinois, started to steam when he was 16. When he was taken to hospital this year, his doctor told him that he & # 39; the lungs of a 70-year-old & # 39; had

Adam Hergenreder, 18, from Illinois, started to steam when he was 16. When he was taken to hospital this year, his doctor told him that he & # 39; the lungs of a 70-year-old & # 39; had

Adam Hergenreder, 18, from Illinois, started to steam when he was 16. When he was taken to hospital this year, his doctor told him that he & # 39; the lungs of a 70-year-old & # 39; had

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"I had the shivers. I would randomize, & he said. "I knew it wasn't a stroke, but it felt that way because I couldn't control myself."

After three days of continuous illness, he sought medical help and an X-ray revealed the full extent of the damage to his lungs. Doctors said that if he was admitted to the hospital two or three days later, his breathing might have worsened to the point where he died.

He was once an avid athlete and now he notices that even walking upstairs makes him breathless.

With 13 deaths and at least 805 other cases related to vape in the US, where politicians, including Donald Trump, have started to control e-cigarettes, experts in the Atlantic cannot understand why their British colleagues are so complacent .

Stanton Glantz, director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, said it is "ridiculous" that Public Health England (PHE) can insist that pulmonary disease is an "American phenomenon."

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Professor Glantz emphasized an underreported case in the medical journal The BMJ last year in which four Birmingham doctors revealed that they had identified lipoid pneumonia in a young female vaper. She developed "treacherous cough, progressive dyspnea (difficulty breathing) with exercise, fever, night sweats … with respiratory failure when admitted to hospital".

In the US, e-cigarette company Juul is confronted with a criminal investigation into whether it is intentionally sold to minors. Their CEO has also left the company due to increasing outrage

In the US, e-cigarette company Juul is confronted with a criminal investigation into whether it is intentionally sold to minors. Their CEO has also left the company due to increasing outrage

In the US, e-cigarette company Juul is confronted with a criminal investigation into whether it is intentionally sold to minors. Their CEO has also left the company due to increasing outrage

Public Heath England, which promotes e-cigarettes as & # 39; much less harmful & # 39; than tobacco, the US crisis blames cannabis instead of nicotine, while the British anti-smoking charity Ash (action against smoking and health) urges smokers to & # 39; an attempt at fumes & # 39 ;.

But the British watchdog, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, has linked sheep to 100 health problems, including heart disease and pneumonia. Since 2014, 74 cases have been registered, of which 49 are serious.

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Whatever anti-smoking and public health officials in Great Britain say about the virtues of e-cigarettes, two coherent crises have been hit in the US: first, the outcome of cases of serious lung disease; and second, the explosion in the vape of teenagers, which experts fear could cause a new generation of nicotine addicts.

In any case, British health officials say that it is not yet clear what exactly causes death and disease. But that has not prevented the US from acting quickly to prevent the crisis from escalating, while doctors and scientists are trying to understand the mysterious lung disease.

Officials warn that hundreds, possibly thousands, more people may also have been affected, but doctors have never associated their disease with vapors. In more than half of the confirmed cases, the victims were less than 25 years old.

President Trump, who is usually averse to tying up American companies in bureaucracy, has announced plans to ban the sweet-tasting e-cigarettes with fruit and mint flavors that are popular with teenage users.

British watchdog, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, has linked vapen to 100 health problems, including heart disease and pneumonia (photo of the file)

British watchdog, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, has linked vapen to 100 health problems, including heart disease and pneumonia (photo of the file)

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British watchdog, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, has linked vapen to 100 health problems, including heart disease and pneumonia (photo of the file)

Many experts think that they can contain an ingredient that causes lung disease. It is estimated that more than five million children in the US are sheep, almost all with non-tobacco flavored varieties.

A growing number of states, including New York and Massachusetts, have already banned flavored vapors. Others, such as California, have given everyone a general warning to stop vaping. Retail giant Walmart has stopped selling it.

The billionaire former mayor of New York, Michael Bloomberg, is funding a £ 130 million program to deal with the emergency. He says: & # 39; the e-cigarette companies and tobacco companies that support them hunt the American youth & # 39; and use the same marketing tactics that & # 39; ever have attracted children to cigarettes & # 39 ;.

Ned Sharpless, commissioner of the US Government's Food and Drug Administration (FDA), admitted to the congress last week that his agency should do more & # 39; to stop mortality and teenage addiction from vapors.

& # 39; Vape juice & # 39;, as the e-cigarette liquid is called, often contains compounds that contain tin, lead, nickel, chromium and manganese (file photo)

& # 39; Vape juice & # 39;, as the e-cigarette liquid is called, often contains compounds that contain tin, lead, nickel, chromium and manganese (file photo)

& # 39; Vape juice & # 39;, as the e-cigarette liquid is called, often contains compounds that contain tin, lead, nickel, chromium and manganese (file photo)

Almost simultaneously, the director of Juul Labs, the largest e-cigarette producer in the country, left the company amid growing outrage over Juul's role in the rising vape of teenagers.

Anti-vape activists smiled when the Juul boss was immediately replaced by a director of Altria, a tobacco giant who owns 35 percent of Juul – a company that is also bending its financial strength to dominate the UK e-cigarette market. The appointment, critics say, reveals the truth – denied by e-cigarette manufacturers – that "Big Tobacco" leads the sheep industry.

In the US, Juul is confronted with a criminal investigation into whether it is intentionally sold to minors.

Teen Adam Hergenreder, in the photo, was once an avid athlete, but now finds that even walking upstairs makes him breathless
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Teen Adam Hergenreder, in the photo, was once an avid athlete, but now finds that even walking upstairs makes him breathless

Teen Adam Hergenreder, in the photo, was once an avid athlete, but now finds that even walking upstairs makes him breathless

It was also forced to cancel its Make The Switch campaign after the FDA had condemned it as an illegal attempt to portray its vape products more safely than traditional tobacco cigarettes.

E-cigarettes still deliver a hit of highly addictive tobacco-derived nicotine, but via liquid in a cartridge, usually refillable, that turns into vapor that the user inhales when electronically heated.

Something in the fluid – an oil or other substance in the cloud of chemicals produced – penetrates users' lungs and causes serious and to some extent irreversible damage. The symptoms, which gradually worsen, include coughing, shortness of breath, tiredness, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

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Many people who are sick have been diagnosed with lipoid pneumonia, with harmful oils or fats entering the lungs. Doctors say that this is consistent with vapen, because different types of oil are used in vapen cartridges. However, lipoid pneumonia usually affects older patients, so experts are shocked to see it in teenagers.

& # 39; Vape juice & # 39;, as the e-cigarette liquid is called, often contains compounds that contain tin, lead, nickel, chromium and manganese. And while propylene glycol – used in the flavored vapors – is a harmless chemical that is also used in asthma inhalers, cheaper substitutes sometimes use a substitute: diethylene glycol, a toxic industrial solvent.

Another possibility is that the powerful nicotine "salts" that are increasingly used in vapors can be the culprit.

Some experts believe instead that the lung disease cannot be caused by a particular ingredient, but simply by the vapor process of inhaling an aerosol fluid.

Juul, whose vape pens look like elongated USB sticks, represents more than 70 percent of the US sheep market and the £ 31 billion company dominates the industry (photo of file)

Juul, whose vape pens look like elongated USB sticks, represents more than 70 percent of the US sheep market and the £ 31 billion company dominates the industry (photo of file)

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Juul, whose vape pens look like elongated USB sticks, represents more than 70 percent of the US sheep market and the £ 31 billion company dominates the industry (photo of file)

And a lot of inhalation is involved. E-cigarette enthusiasts claim that they contain much less nicotine per puff pastry than a regular cigarette. To get the same nicotine "hit" as a cigarette, users have to puff on them much longer and more often.

Vapen advocates in the UK, where flavored vape juices are also widely available, have joined the large number of American vape diseases where the victim had vascular THC, the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, which is legally available in a large part of the US

However, many of the victims had not touched cannabis and only used nicotine.

The first e-cigarette – or electronic cigarette – was invented by a Chinese chemist in 2002 to help smokers stop the habit of carcinogenic tobacco.

The terrible irony in America is that before e-cigarettes arrived (Juul launched his first vapor sets in 2015 with a shiny advertising campaign with young-looking models), teenagers had almost stopped smoking.

British anti-smoking charity Ash estimates that there are 3.6 million adult e-cigarette users in the UK, a & # 39; significant growth & # 39; of the 700,000 who vaped in 2012 (file photo)

British anti-smoking charity Ash estimates that there are 3.6 million adult e-cigarette users in the UK, a & # 39; significant growth & # 39; of the 700,000 who vaped in 2012 (file photo)

British anti-smoking charity Ash estimates that there are 3.6 million adult e-cigarette users in the UK, a & # 39; significant growth & # 39; of the 700,000 who vaped in 2012 (file photo)

Now the latest data show that 27.5 percent of high school students had used e-cigarettes in the last 30 days, compared to 20.8 percent in 2018.

Juul, whose elegant sheep pens look like elongated USB sticks, accounts for more than 70 percent of the American vapor market. The £ 31 billion company dominates the industry and much of its success came from its attraction to teenagers.

Juul and his competitors insist that they have never intentionally focused on minors, but the market is flooded with vape juices in flavors such as bubblegum, gummibeer and candy floss.

Its marketing is strongly focused on capturing teenagers' interest, recruiting "influencers" on social media on Instagram and Facebook. Vapen celebrities such as Johnny Depp and the model Bella Hadid have reinforced the idea that e-cigarettes are cool.

Juul staff even managed to infiltrate American schools under the guise of anti-addiction campaigns.

Meredith Berkman, one of the three New York mothers who founded the Parents against Vape e-cigarettes pressure group, told me that she was asked to act on the day her 14-year-old son came home from school and said a Juul representative his class had told that the company's products were & # 39; completely safe & # 39; and were the & # 39; iPhone of vapen & # 39 ;.

"For every adult who might stop using an e – cigarette like Juul, you have 80 children who are initiated into tobacco products," says Ms. Berkman, quoting a recent study.

In America, Juul's marketing is strongly focused on capturing teenagers' interest, recruiting "influencers" on social media on Instagram and Facebook (file photo)

In America, Juul's marketing is strongly focused on capturing teenagers' interest, recruiting "influencers" on social media on Instagram and Facebook (file photo)

In America, Juul's marketing is strongly focused on capturing teenagers' interest, recruiting "influencers" on social media on Instagram and Facebook (file photo)

The current health crisis with regard to e-cigarettes is a result of the fact that US health officials have not regulated failure in the past and marketed products before they were properly tested, she claims.

Meanwhile, studies show that nicotine damages the developing brain and there is increasing evidence that it also causes cardiovascular damage.

Mrs. Berkman acknowledges that UK e-cigarette regulations are stricter – for example, the maximum nicotine content is 2 percent, while in the US it is 7 percent.

She says, however, "British parents should be aware that Juul and his copycats are clearly Big Tobacco 2.0."

HOW CAN VAPEN BE HARMFUL?

The flavors in electronic cigarettes can damage blood vessels in the same way as heart disease, according to research published in June.

The chemicals used to give the vapor flavors, such as cinnamon, strawberry and banana, can cause inflammation in cells in the arteries, veins and the heart.

They ensure that the body responds in a way that mimics the early signs of heart disease, heart attack, or stroke, the Boston University study found.

Other recent studies have also suggested that smoking e-cigarettes can cause DNA mutations that can lead to cancer and cause bacteria that cause pneumonia to stick to the lungs more easily.

Researchers at New York University have exposed human bladder and lung cells to e-cigarette vapor, which is marketed as healthier than tobacco.

They found the cells mutated and became cancer much faster than expected and mice exposed to the vapor also suffered significant DNA damage.

In another study, scientists at Queen Mary University in London discovered that vape users are more likely to cause pneumonia – just like smoking tobacco or breathing in traffic fumes.

The vapor from e-cigarettes helps bacteria that cause the condition to stick to the cells along the airways, they said.

The effect occurs with traditional cigarette smoke and people exposed to air pollution with many particles from vehicle exhaust gases.

In the UK, where Juul sells his vaping "starter kit" for £ 29.99 online, the company's managing director, Dan Thomson, has a major part of his "global cigarette elimination mission" and helping 7.2 million smokers from Great Britain avoid the habit.

British opponents, such as the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, have put Westminster under pressure to take action now to prevent e-cigarettes from attacking British children.

But public health in England continues to applaud vapors for weaning tobacco smokers.

Minimizing the fear that the American nightmare could spread to Britain, emphasizes that British e-cigarettes contain much less nicotine, cannot be advertised in print or broadcast and cannot be sold to persons under the age of 18 (although the same age restriction theoretically also applies to the ONS).

ASH says that & # 39; regularly & # 39; sheep among British children & # 39; rare & # 39; although 67 percent of 16 to 18 year olds have tried it. Other recent studies have confirmed that more children get a pull every year to try it.

ASH estimates that there are 3.6 million adult users of e-cigarettes in the UK, a "significant growth" of the 700,000 that evaporated in 2012.

Health campaigners complain that the British tobacco industry uses the same cynical tactics to attract teenagers for e-cigarettes as in the US

The Advertising Standards Authority investigates claims that British American Tobacco uses social media platforms such as Instagram, Twitter and Facebook to promote its Vype e-cigarettes among minors.

An anti-smoking poster campaign is being held in the London Underground – strangely enough, funded by the American tobacco giant Philip Morris International.

Why would the maker of Marlboro cigarettes encourage people to stop using the product? The answer becomes clear when you go to Change Incorporated, the website that is advertised on the posters, which gives advice on quitting smoking alternating with subtle promotion of vapen.

In 2018, Philip Morris International was accused of "disconcerting hypocrisy" by cancer campaigners after launching an advertising campaign calling on the British people to stop smoking while still advertising outside the UK.

The company – which also makes e-cigarettes – sees its toxic industry in the West deteriorate and has discussed its ambition for a "smoke-free" future. But of course it wants smokers to simply switch to his & # 39; scientifically based smoke-free products & # 39; – which also contain nicotine and are therefore addictive.

But still, if the experts can't figure out why e-cigarettes kill people, they might be facing their final sigh.

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