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During the peak of the Covid-19 crisis, a nursing home resident died every minute

In mid-April, a nursing home resident died every minute in England and Wales at the height of the coronavirus crisis, shocking data shows.

Figures from the Office for National Statistics released today show that 1,300 nursing home residents died on April 12, the darkest day in the industry’s pandemic.

That’s nearly one death per minute and more than three times the fatality rate on the same date last year, when 407 residents died.

A total of 495 deaths on April 12 were confirmed as Covid-19 after a positive test, but the virus was probably to blame for hundreds more.

Very few residents and nursing home staff were wiped clean for the disease at the time because tests were reserved for the sickest hospital patients and NHS employees.

It means that thousands of cases went undiagnosed as the virus sped through the social care sector.

The ONS figures also showed that Covid-19 was involved in nearly 20,000 deaths of care home residents in England and Wales.

Of a total of 19,394 deaths between March 2 and June 12, Covid-19 was listed on the death certificate, whether or not as an underlying cause.

This makes the total mortality of nursing home residents a third higher than the 14,658 nursing home deaths reported by the US on Tuesday.

Figures from the Office for National Statistics released today show that 1,300 nursing home residents died on April 12, the darkest day in the industry pandemic

Figures from the Office for National Statistics released today show that 1,300 nursing home residents died on April 12, the darkest day in the industry pandemic

The most recent data includes all nursing home residents who died of coronavirus in their nursing home or hospital.

Three in four residents died in their care home while a quarter died in the hospital, the figures show.

Of the nearly 20,000 deaths, 16,305 (84 percent) were classified as “confirmed” Covid-19 and 3,089 (16 percent) were classified as “suspected” Covid-19.

Care staff and residents will be regularly tested for coronavirus from next week, but temporary workers ‘are NOT included’

Employees and residents in care homes for people over 65 or with dementia will be regularly tested for coronavirus from next week, the government announced today.

The Department of Health and Social Care said staff will be tested weekly, while residents will be tested every 28 days as part of a new social care testing strategy.

This is in addition to intensive testing in any care home with an outbreak or an increased risk of flare-up, the DHSC added.

Sam Monaghan, CEO of MHA Care Homes told BBC Today’s Today program that he welcomed the new guideline as “the step change we needed.”

However, Mr. Monaghan also warned that, as far as he knows, agency workers are “not involved in this” and that many nursing homes rely on it.

Temporary workers make up about 10 percent of the social workforce, and nursing homes are three times more likely to rely on them than in other industries.

The repeat test program will be rolled out to all nursing homes for people over 65 and people with dementia who have applied for re-assessment in the next four weeks, before being extended to the entire nursing home sector from August.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said, “Our response to this global pandemic has always been guided by the latest scientific advice from world-class experts, and we will now offer repeated tests to staff and residents in care homes, starting with expanding homes for older residents to the entire care home sector.

“This will not only protect residents and caregivers, but it will also provide security and peace of mind to families concerned about their loved ones, and give staff the confidence to do what they do best.”

The government has been criticized for failing to protect nursing homes from the virus.

A separate US report today found that after a housebreak, at least a fifth of all residents contracted the virus and one in 14 staff members became infected.

The results came as part of the Vivaldi study, which examined 9,081 nursing homes in England between May 26 and June 20.

Of the 9,081 nursing homes included in the study, more than half (56 percent) reported at least one confirmed case of coronavirus among staff or residents.

More than one in ten (11 percent) of all residents tested positive, while 4 percent of staff were diagnosed with the disease.

They report finding a direct relationship between the number of bank nurses or carers employed by the nursing home and the number of infections among residents.

These homes were 60 percent more likely to have outbreaks than care homes that do not use temporary workers.

The contamination level was compared to the level observed in London; this analysis showed that r

Residents of nursing homes outside London were less likely to be infected than residential homes in London, the figures show.

The only exception to this was for nursing homes in the West Midlands, where residents’ likelihood of infection had increased by 9 percent from London.

Becky Tinsley, chief statistician for COVID-19 Surveillance Studies at ONS, said: ‘These are the first results of the Vivaldi study, a large-scale study that looked specifically at care home infections that provide care to people with dementia and the elderly across England. .

“From this, we estimated that more than half of these healthcare facilities have had at least one confirmed case of COVID-19 among their staff and residents.

“Future work will include a more detailed analysis and will include COVID-19 test results from the entire nursing home testing program.”

Based on the numbers, the government announced today that nursing home staff and residents over 65 – or with dementia – will be regularly tested for coronavirus starting next week.

The Department of Health and Social Care said staff will be tested weekly, while residents will be tested every 28 days as part of a new social care testing strategy.

This is in addition to intensive testing in any care home with an outbreak or an increased risk of flare-up, the DHSC added.

Sam Monaghan, CEO of MHA Care Homes told BBC Today’s Today program that he welcomed the new guideline as “the step change we needed.”

However, Mr. Monaghan also warned that, as far as he knows, agency workers are “not involved in this” and that many nursing homes rely on it.

Temporary workers make up about 10 percent of the social workforce, and nursing homes are three times more likely to rely on them than in other industries.

The repeat test program will be rolled out to all nursing homes for people over 65 and people with dementia who have applied for re-assessment in the next four weeks, before being extended to the entire nursing home sector from August.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said, “Our response to this global pandemic has always been guided by the latest scientific advice from world-class experts, and we will now offer repeated tests to staff and residents in care homes, starting with expanding homes for older residents to the entire care home sector.

“This will not only protect residents and caregivers, but it will also provide security and peace of mind to families concerned about their loved ones, and give staff the confidence to do what they do best.”

The government has been criticized for failing to protect nursing homes from the virus.

There are 14,658 Covid-19 deaths registered in care homes in England and Wales registered through June 19, according to the latest data from the Office for National Statistics.

A report by the National Audit Office last month claimed that about 25,000 hospital patients were discharged to care homes at the height of the pandemic in England without all of them being tested for Covid-19.

The new testing strategy follows the latest advice from the government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) and new evidence that points to a higher prevalence in nursing homes, the DHSC said.

The Vivaldi 1 study, which surveyed nearly 9,000 nursing home managers and analyzed data from entire nursing home studies, identified the higher levels of the virus among healthcare personnel – particularly among temporary personnel working in multiple healthcare environments, it added.

The study suggested that nursing home staff is at increased risk of contracting the virus, which they can then pass on to others if they don’t have symptoms, the DHSC said.

The new repeat testing program was welcomed by leaders in the healthcare sector who said it was “absolutely essential” to support healthcare institutions in controlling the spread of infections.

Martin Green, Care England CEO, said: ‘The testing program is one of the cornerstones of Covid-19 prevention, and we are pleased that the Department of Health and Social Care has recognized and responded with a comprehensive approach to repeated testing . ‘

Vic Rayner, Executive Director of the National Care Forum, added, “Access to repeated and regular tests is absolutely central to supporting nursing homes in controlling the spread of infection within nursing homes.

“Testing has proven to be an indispensable tool in the box for providers, and the continued expansion of the testing regime is essential.”

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