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‘Drunk’ Trudeau sang Bohemian Rhapsody 48 hours before Queen’s funeral

‘Drunk’ Canadian PM Trudeau is slammed as a ‘tone deaf embarrassment’ for singing Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody at London hotel before Elizabeth II’s state funeral

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Justin Trudeau has faced intense backlash after a clip emerged (pictured) of him singing Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody after a dinner just two days before Queen Elizabeth II's state funeral. The Prime Minister of Canada was filmed singing Freddie Mercury 's iconic song during an impromptu session at Corinthia Hotel, London, during the official period of mourning just days before Her Majesty's state funeral.

Justin Trudeau has faced intense backlash after a clip emerged (pictured) of him singing Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody after a dinner just two days before Queen Elizabeth II’s state funeral. The Prime Minister of Canada was filmed singing Freddie Mercury ‘s iconic song during an impromptu session at Corinthia Hotel, London, during the official period of mourning just days before Her Majesty’s state funeral.

Canada's premier, 50, arrived in England following the Queen Elizabeth's death to join world leaders at her monumental funeral on Monday morning. Wearing a casual maroon t-shirt, Trudeau was seen standing over a piano during an ad lib singalong with other members of his formal delegation in the lobby of the central London hotel.

Canada’s premier, 50, arrived in England following the Queen Elizabeth’s death to join world leaders at her monumental funeral on Monday morning. Wearing a casual maroon t-shirt, Trudeau was seen standing over a piano during an ad lib singalong with other members of his formal delegation in the lobby of the central London hotel.

It's understood that Gregory Charles, a renowned musician from Quebec, was playing the keys while others joined in the tune on Saturday night. Trudeau was heard hitting the infamous notes, along with Queen's lyrics: 'Easy come, easy go. Little high, little low.' The Prime Minister, whose country recognized the Queen - and now King Charles - as their official head of state, harmonized with the pianist during the short clip.

It’s understood that Gregory Charles, a renowned musician from Quebec, was playing the keys while others joined in the tune on Saturday night. Trudeau was heard hitting the infamous notes, along with Queen’s lyrics: ‘Easy come, easy go. Little high, little low.’ The Prime Minister, whose country recognized the Queen – and now King Charles – as their official head of state, harmonized with the pianist during the short clip.

It was filmed after the delegation attended a dinner on Saturday night. However, the unearthed video has caused fury online - as many slammed the premier for the jollity just 48 hours before the Queen's funeral at Westminster Abbey and her burial. The beloved monarch died at the age of 96 on Thursday September 8, 2022 at Balmoral Castle in Scotland.

It was filmed after the delegation attended a dinner on Saturday night. However, the unearthed video has caused fury online – as many slammed the premier for the jollity just 48 hours before the Queen’s funeral at Westminster Abbey and her burial. The beloved monarch died at the age of 96 on Thursday September 8, 2022 at Balmoral Castle in Scotland.

One furious person wrote online: 'Curious as to how you can qualify this as paying tribute to the life and service of Her Majesty? Because they were singing music from Queen? That's rather crass!' Another fuming onlooker added: 'Paying tribute? How tone deaf do you have to be to think this is somehow a tribute? This is an embarrassment.' A third said: 'Singing drunkenly is a 'tribute'? What an embarrassment.' There is no indication that the Prime Minister had been drinking before singing at the piano on Saturday night. Pictured: Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie Trudeau leave Westminster Abbey after the State Funeral of Queen Elizabeth II.

One furious person wrote online: ‘Curious as to how you can qualify this as paying tribute to the life and service of Her Majesty? Because they were singing music from Queen? That’s rather crass!’ Another fuming onlooker added: ‘Paying tribute? How tone deaf do you have to be to think this is somehow a tribute? This is an embarrassment.’ A third said: ‘Singing drunkenly is a ‘tribute’? What an embarrassment.’ There is no indication that the Prime Minister had been drinking before singing at the piano on Saturday night. Pictured: Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie Trudeau leave Westminster Abbey after the State Funeral of Queen Elizabeth II.

Another blasted the Prime Minister for his actions, considering the circumstances of his trip: 'It’s an unbecoming, undignified display and completely inappropriate given the circumstances and his position.' A fifth said: 'Trudeau sure seems to have a heavy heart as he fools around at a bar last night. I thought he was in mourning?' But other onlookers saw no offense in Trudeau's actions - believing that after over a week of mourning it was normal for those grieving to let off some steam. One person said: 'I see no issue,' while another added: 'We are reaching here. I don't see the big deal.'

Another blasted the Prime Minister for his actions, considering the circumstances of his trip: ‘It’s an unbecoming, undignified display and completely inappropriate given the circumstances and his position.’ A fifth said: ‘Trudeau sure seems to have a heavy heart as he fools around at a bar last night. I thought he was in mourning?’ But other onlookers saw no offense in Trudeau’s actions – believing that after over a week of mourning it was normal for those grieving to let off some steam. One person said: ‘I see no issue,’ while another added: ‘We are reaching here. I don’t see the big deal.’

Coming to his defense, another said: 'You’re only annoyed of this because you don’t like Trudeau to begin with. There is nothing wrong with him singing and being a normal person during the evening in a non-official event and setting. He’s the Prime Minister, but he’s not a robot.' The Prime Minister's spokesperson said: 'After dinner on Saturday, Prime Minister joined a small gathering with members of the Canadian delegation, who have come together to pay tribute to the life and service of Her Majesty.'

Coming to his defense, another said: ‘You’re only annoyed of this because you don’t like Trudeau to begin with. There is nothing wrong with him singing and being a normal person during the evening in a non-official event and setting. He’s the Prime Minister, but he’s not a robot.’ The Prime Minister’s spokesperson said: ‘After dinner on Saturday, Prime Minister joined a small gathering with members of the Canadian delegation, who have come together to pay tribute to the life and service of Her Majesty.’

They continued; 'Gregory Charles, a renowned musician from Quebec and Order of Canada recipient, played piano in the hotel lobby which resulted in some members of the delegation including the prime minister joining. Over the past 10 days, the Prime Minister has taken part in various activities to pay his respects for the Queen and today, the entire delegation is taking part in the State Funeral.' Trudeau, who has served as held office in Canada since 2015, has been at the center of multiple scandals - including when images of him in blackface were uncovered.

They continued; ‘Gregory Charles, a renowned musician from Quebec and Order of Canada recipient, played piano in the hotel lobby which resulted in some members of the delegation including the prime minister joining. Over the past 10 days, the Prime Minister has taken part in various activities to pay his respects for the Queen and today, the entire delegation is taking part in the State Funeral.’ Trudeau, who has served as held office in Canada since 2015, has been at the center of multiple scandals – including when images of him in blackface were uncovered.

He made a series of apologies after the 2001 photograph of him emerged in brown face at an Arabian Nights party when he was a teacher. He also referred to a high school incident where he dressed up as Harry Belafonte to sing the Jamaican song Day-O. A video of him as a young man in blackface also emerged during the 2019 election. And in 2018, a report emerged that Trudeau, who was 28 at the time, had groped a female reporter while at the Kokanee Summit in Creston, B.C in 2000.

He made a series of apologies after the 2001 photograph of him emerged in brown face at an Arabian Nights party when he was a teacher. He also referred to a high school incident where he dressed up as Harry Belafonte to sing the Jamaican song Day-O. A video of him as a young man in blackface also emerged during the 2019 election. And in 2018, a report emerged that Trudeau, who was 28 at the time, had groped a female reporter while at the Kokanee Summit in Creston, B.C in 2000.

The woman, speaking in 2018 after the story resurfaced, said: 'The incident referred to in the editorial did occur, as reported. Mr. Trudeau did apologize the next day. I did not pursue the incident at the time and will not be pursuing the incident further. I have had no subsequent contact with Mr. Trudeau, before or after he became Prime Minister.'

The woman, speaking in 2018 after the story resurfaced, said: ‘The incident referred to in the editorial did occur, as reported. Mr. Trudeau did apologize the next day. I did not pursue the incident at the time and will not be pursuing the incident further. I have had no subsequent contact with Mr. Trudeau, before or after he became Prime Minister.’

And in the aftermath, Trudeau said in a statement: 'Over the past weeks, since this news resurfaced, I’ve been reflecting, we’ve all been reflecting, on past behaviors. And as I’ve said, I’m confident I didn’t act inappropriately, but I think the essence of this is people can experience interactions differently and part of the lesson we need to learn in this moment of collective awakening … people in many cases, women, experience interactions in professional contexts and other contexts differently than men.'

And in the aftermath, Trudeau said in a statement: ‘Over the past weeks, since this news resurfaced, I’ve been reflecting, we’ve all been reflecting, on past behaviors. And as I’ve said, I’m confident I didn’t act inappropriately, but I think the essence of this is people can experience interactions differently and part of the lesson we need to learn in this moment of collective awakening … people in many cases, women, experience interactions in professional contexts and other contexts differently than men.’

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