Drug dealer, 19, acquitted of murder of musician, convicted of murdering rival dealer

0

A teenager who helped dispose of the body parts of a talented trumpet player has been acquitted of his murder but found guilty of the murder of a second man.

53-year-old jazz musician William Algar, known as Blaise, was murdered and dismembered at his home in Barnes, southwest London, jurors heard.

Days later, 35-year-old drug dealer Ebrima Cham, nicknamed the ‘Brim Reaper’, was also killed in a frenzied attack on a flat in Hounslow, West London.

After a trial against Old Bailey, a 19-year-old man, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, was found not guilty of the murder and manslaughter of Mr Algar, but guilty of the murder of Mr Cham.

He had previously admitted to disrupting the course of justice by assisting in the removal of Mr Algar’s body.

The jury, which deliberated for more than 34 hours, had heard that the teenage co-defendant blamed Simon Emmons for the murder, despite appearing to confess to another man.

A 19-year-old who helped remove the body parts of talented trumpeter William Algar has been cleared of murder and manslaughter

A 19-year-old who helped remove the body parts of talented trumpeter William Algar has been cleared of murder and manslaughter

Fellow drug dealers Emmons, 40, with no permanent address, and Zimele Dube, 33, of Hounslow, were convicted of the murder of Mr. Cham by a majority of 10 to two.

Emmons and street dealer Janayo Lucima, 19, of Kensington, were also convicted of disturbing the course of justice, along with Marc Harding, 45, of Hounslow, who admitted the charges.

Prosecutor Crispin Aylett QC said the attack on Mr Algar was “of extraordinary cruelty without anger.”

He told the jurors that it was ‘insane’ and ‘the work of groundbreaking psychopathic proportions’.

Mr. Algar was described in court as a “good guy” who had many interests and “had no harmful bone in his body.”

But after a trial against Old Bailey, the teenager, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, was found guilty, along with two co-defendants, of the murder of rival drug dealer Ebrima Cham (pictured) in nearby Hounslow.

But after a trial against Old Bailey, the teenager, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, was found guilty, along with two co-defendants, of the murder of rival drug dealer Ebrima Cham (pictured) in nearby Hounslow.

But after a trial against Old Bailey, the teenager, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, was found guilty, along with two co-defendants, of the murder of rival drug dealer Ebrima Cham (pictured) in nearby Hounslow.

He was suffering from mental health problems and was diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

His life gained momentum after he began using and trading Class A drugs and his home was taken over by other dealers in what is known as a ‘cuckoo house’.

Jurors learned that he had argued with the 19-year-old unnamed defendant about money before his death around December 1, 2019.

It was alleged that the defendant, described as a drug dealing gangster, bullied Mr. Algar and threatened to kill his cat, which was never found.

Following Mr. Algar’s death, the defendant held a meeting with Emmons and Lucima on December 16 to decide what to do with the body, the court heard.

The Old Bailey learned that the clean-up operation and removal of Mr Algar's body was interrupted by the impromptu decision to attack Mr Cham, who allegedly robbed other dealers of cash and drugs.  On January 3, 2020, Mr Algar's head and torso were discovered at his home (photo) after his mother raised the alarm

The Old Bailey learned that the clean-up operation and removal of Mr Algar's body was interrupted by the impromptu decision to attack Mr Cham, who allegedly robbed other dealers of cash and drugs.  On January 3, 2020, Mr Algar's head and torso were discovered at his home (photo) after his mother raised the alarm

The Old Bailey learned that the clean-up operation and removal of Mr Algar’s body was interrupted by the spontaneous decision to attack Mr Cham, who allegedly robs other dealers of cash and drugs. On January 3, 2020, Mr Algar’s head and torso were discovered at his home (photo) after his mother raised the alarm

Early the next day, Emmons’s phone was reportedly used to investigate how to dissolve a body in acid, such as a plot from the television series Breaking Bad.

Lucima bought cleaning products from Tesco, and the following days, Mr. Algar was chopped up and his limbs dumped at Hounslow Heath.

The clean-up operation was interrupted by the impromptu decision to attack Mr Cham, who allegedly robbed other dealers of cash and drugs, jurors heard.

Emmons, Dube and the unidentified 19-year-old traveled to Mr. Cham’s home, where he was stabbed 11 times in a “savage and frenzied attack,” said Mr. Aylett.

On January 3, 2020, Mr Algar’s head and torso were discovered by police at his home.

The victim’s elderly mother had raised the alarm after not keeping in touch with her over Christmas.

Mr Aylett said: ‘All of the events that are taking place in this case, both in relation to Mr Algar and in relation to Mr Cham, take place in the context of the lucrative and lawless world of Class A drug trafficking.

The drug trafficking world is one of rivalries, robberies and turf wars.

And when drug dealers drop out, they don’t bring their problems to the police.

“Instead, they take matters into their own hands – usually by force and often ending in death or serious injury.”

The 19-year-old, unnamed defendant, denied the murders, claiming that he had seen Emmons chop off Mr Algar’s legs with a Rambo knife.

He admitted to going to the house to clean up, but denied making plans to use a Breaking Bad-inspired acid bath to get rid of the body.

He dismissed alleged confessions as mere boasting.

In his evidence, Emmons rejected the 19-year-old’s allegation that he confessed to the murders, saying the charge that he was involved in the cleanup was “ fantasy talk. ”

The defendants were remanded in custody and will be sentenced at the Old Bailey on July 23.

.