Drowning migrants trying to cross the US from Mexico scream and wave in the Rio Grande

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Drowning migrants trying to enter the US from Mexico were rescued from the Rio Grande this week by a people smuggler in the latest harrowing incident that exposed the crisis on the southern border.

Joe Biden’s “reckless” open borders policy was described by Sean Hannity as “a gift to traffickers, drug traffickers – a boom for the drug cartels … the consequences are devastating, 90 percent of the fentanyl [potent synthetic heroin] comes from that southern border.’

Footage taken by a Fox News reporter in Roma, Texas, shows migrants screaming for help in the water on Tuesday night trying to cross from the cartel stronghold of Ciudad Miguel Aleman, in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas.

Screams echo across the Rio Grande as migrants wail, “I’m drowning.”

A smuggler in a dinghy seems to rescue them and luckily all the people survived.

“This is a crisis,” reporter Sara Carter said. “It was terrifying, but everyone in that video survived. Both the Texas National Guard and Border Patrol were getting ready to go in and rescue them, but the smuggler put them back in the boat.

“That’s just a little bit of what we went through last night.”

The Biden administration on Tuesday formally repealed Donald Trump’s “Stay in Mexico” policy, which kept asylum seekers on the other side of the southern border while awaiting hearings in US immigration courts.

The system had sent about 70,000 migrants back to Mexico since January 2019 — until Biden shut it down on its first day in office earlier this year.

Migrants trying to cross from Mexico to be seen in the Rio Grande on Tuesday evening

Migrants trying to cross from Mexico to be seen in the Rio Grande on Tuesday evening

A smuggler in a dinghy then appears to rescue them and luckily all the people survived

A smuggler in a dinghy then appears to rescue them and luckily all the people survived

The people smuggler is seen helping the people into the water.

The people smuggler is seen helping the people into the water. “This is a crisis,” reporter Sara Carter said. “It was terrifying, but everyone in that video survived. Both the Texas National Guard and Border Patrol were getting ready to go in and rescue them, but the smuggler put them back in the boat.”

Fox News reporter rushes to the screams, joined by members of the National Guard and Border Patrol

Fox News reporter rushes to the screams, joined by members of the National Guard and Border Patrol

Hannity's report also included heartbreaking footage of a little boy who had been abandoned at the Texas border screaming for help.

Hannity’s report also included heartbreaking footage of a little boy who had been abandoned at the Texas border screaming for help.

Hannity’s report also included heartbreaking footage of a little boy left behind on the Texas border screaming for help.

“That kid is a victim of this open borders policy of Joe,” Hannity said, “And that kid deserves better. He’ll probably be put in one of Biden’s new cages where they’re stacked up in the middle of a pandemic.”

The Biden administration marked the first of National Immigrant Heritage Month on Tuesday by asking Congress to pass the 2021 U.S. Citizenship Act, which Biden threw on his first day in office, paving the way for 11 million undocumented migrants. to stay legally in the US.

“My plan would provide a pathway to legal permanent residence and citizenship for these undocumented immigrants, including Dreamers, individuals with temporary protected status, farm workers and other vital workers who contribute to our nation every day,” said Biden’s proclamation.

The White House memo also noted that it was a “particularly difficult period” thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic and “the all-too-frequent demonization of immigrants,” with Biden asking Americans to “renew our values ​​as a welcoming nation.” to fit’ .’

Biden’s changes to Trump’s “Stay in Mexico” were a foregone conclusion — as Biden as a candidate promised to end the policy — but the president left a window open by ordering a review before closing it permanently.

President Joe Biden

Former President Donald Trump

The administration of President Joe Biden (left) on Tuesday formally ended former President Donald Trump’s (right) “Stay in Mexico” policy, which forced asylum seekers in Mexico to wait for US immigration court hearings

Homeland Security Minister Alejandro Mayorkas said keeping the policy intact or changing it “is not in line with the vision and values ​​of this government and is a bad use of the ministry’s resources”.

He said the costs would far outweigh the benefits.

The policy has coincided with a sharp decline in the number of asylum seekers at the border, but critics noted that violent conditions in Mexico, lack of access to lawyers and difficulty getting to justice have hampered people.

Mayorkas acknowledged those concerns by pointing to the high rate of rejected claims for failure to appear in court and the lack of housing, income and security in Mexico.

Donald Trump criticized the “disastrous decision” in a statement Wednesday, calling the policy “one of the most successful border security programs anyone has ever implemented anywhere.”

“The Biden administration has inherited the safest border in history and made it the worst border disaster in history. Our border is now run by cartels, criminals and coyotes,” Trump said.

He claimed that everything from criminals to “deadly drugs” “happens like never before.”

“Not only are illegal immigrants caught and released, they are put in hotels at taxpayer expense,” Trump said, referring to the more relaxed “catch-and-release” immigration policy with which the Obama administration has been associated.

Biden’s decision to end Trump-era policies “is proof that their goal is to completely eliminate the US border and flood the country with so many illegal aliens that every community is overwhelmed” Trump said.

A group of migrants boards a van to be tested for Covid-19 on May 26 at a migrant reception center in Matamoros, Mexico

A group of migrants boards a van to be tested for Covid-19 on May 26 at a migrant reception center in Matamoros, Mexico

Asylum-seeking migrant families await processing by US border patrols after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico in Roma, Texas, on May 28

Asylum-seeking migrant families await processing by US border patrols after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico in Roma, Texas, on May 28

Asylum-seeking unaccompanied migrant children from Central America board a US border patrol bus after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico, in Roma, Texas, US, May 20

Asylum-seeking unaccompanied migrant children from Central America board a US border patrol bus after crossing the Rio Grande River into the United States from Mexico, in Roma, Texas, US, May 20

Since February 19, about 11,200 people with active cases have been allowed to return to the US to await a ruling, a process that can take years in the backlog court system.

The government has yet to say whether tens of thousands of others whose cases were dismissed or dismissed will be given another chance.

The administration has largely maintained the pandemic-related powers Trump introduced in March of last year to send people to Mexico without the ability to apply for asylum, justified on the grounds of public health protection.

Mayorkas acknowledged his intention to lift those pandemic-related powers, but was light on the details.

The secretary pointed to a new role in the immigration court announced Friday, which aims to decide asylum cases at the border within 300 days.

He promised “additional anticipated changes in regulations and policies,” without elaborating further.

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