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A farmer who has been robbed of 70,000 liters of drinking water by his neighbor says that he is saddened by the incidents when people look up to each other in drought-stricken areas (photo: drought-stricken Darling Downs)

Boer & # 39; deprived of 70,000 liters of drinking water by a neighbor & # 39; because the police say that landowners become water thieves to get through horror drought

  • Boer was robbed by some of his neighbors 70,000 liters of drinking water
  • People in drought-affected areas use each other for drinking water
  • Andrew Todd said thieves have stolen from him at least five times in five months
  • He believes it is the locals who knew he would be away from his property
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A struggling farmer was robbed by his neighbor of 70,000 liters of drinking water, in just one example of what is developing as a worrying trend.

Andrew Todd, 61, had thieves focus three times in five months on his property in Stanthorpe in southeastern Queensland, stealing an enormous amount of water.

Desperate drought-stricken farmers and families in some of Australia's driest areas are now turning to each other and stealing water wherever they can.

Many watch dams, tanks and household faucets in a desperate attempt to get some relief.

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A farmer who has been robbed of 70,000 liters of drinking water by his neighbor says that he is saddened by the incidents when people look up to each other in drought-stricken areas (photo: drought-stricken Darling Downs)

A farmer who has been robbed of 70,000 liters of drinking water by his neighbor says that he is saddened by the incidents when people look up to each other in drought-stricken areas (photo: drought-stricken Darling Downs)

Andrew Todd, 61, has had thieves attacked on his property in Stanthorpe in southeast Queensland three times for five months and has stolen an enormous amount of water (photo: drought in Stanthorpe)

Andrew Todd, 61, has had thieves attacked on his property in Stanthorpe in southeast Queensland three times for five months and has stolen an enormous amount of water (photo: drought in Stanthorpe)

Andrew Todd, 61, has had thieves attacked on his property in Stanthorpe in southeast Queensland three times for five months and has stolen an enormous amount of water (photo: drought in Stanthorpe)

Mr. Todd told it Courier Mail he installed a new water tank and shipped water about five months ago.

The farmer believes his thieves were locals because they would have known that he was not actively staying at the property.

Although Mr. Todd is not angry with the neighbors, he said he feels sympathy for them and would have liked to have helped them if they were desperate.

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& # 39; It's just very sad. You must now lock your gates, & said Mr. Todd.

Police in the southern Darling Downs and Granite Belt region & # 39; s are shocked when they see desperate farmers becoming criminals.

Owners are forced to lock up their property to ensure that their water stays on their land.

Acting Inspector Gerard Brady said the police believe that those who choose to defy the law have probably never committed a crime before.

In the past six months alone, there have been at least 10 cases of water theft from dams, houses, parks and even Stanthorpe Airport – where the water is used to fight fires.

The farmer believes that his thieves were locals because they would have known that he was not actively staying at the property (photo: granite belt)
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The farmer believes that his thieves were locals because they would have known that he was not actively staying at the property (photo: granite belt)

The farmer believes that his thieves were locals because they would have known that he was not actively staying at the property (photo: granite belt)

Inspector Brady said the situation is now & # 39; dire & # 39; is because thieves try to transfer water into large tanks or trucks.

In most cases, property is planed when the owner is gone, such as the unsuspecting Mr. Todd.

While the police in the area understand the stress of the drought, Insp said. Brady that they were still committing a crime and that anyone caught was charged.

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& # 39; It's just the pressure that people have here, I don't think people see the seriousness of it (the drought), & # 39; he said.

& # 39; It is certainly a problem we have never had before and it is likely to become wider. & # 39;

Insp Brady urges community members to stay on top of their water meters and contact the police if they think they have been attacked by thieves.

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