Drone images show the extent of the floods in Hawaii

New images of drones have captured the catastrophic floods that the tropical storm caused in Kauai, as it shed more than 52 inches of rain in Hawaii for four days

Hurricane Lane may have left, but the damage it caused will be felt for months.

New images of the drones captured the catastrophic floods that the tropical storm caused by shedding more than 52 inches of rain in Hawaii for four days.

Lane is the second largest rainfall in US history. UU., Behind Hurricane Harvey, which dropped 60.58 inches of rain in Nederland, Texas last year.

The new footage shows the magnitude of Lane's damage on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, revealing path after flood of muddy water.

New images of drones have captured the catastrophic floods that the tropical storm caused in Kauai, as it shed more than 52 inches of rain in Hawaii for four days

New images of drones have captured the catastrophic floods that the tropical storm caused in Kauai, as it shed more than 52 inches of rain in Hawaii for four days

Although Lane moved away from the Hawaiian coast on Sunday, much of Kauai remained flooded until Tuesday.

And heavy rains on the island have only worsened flooded roads and highways, forcing more than 20 homes to be evacuated and schools closed.

The downpours are expected to continue this week, which forecasters warn could decelerate cleanup efforts across the state and even aggravate flooding.

More rain could trigger new landslides and continue to threaten lives and property, according to Accuweather.

There could be new evacuation orders and residents who had to seek refuge may not yet be able to return to their homes.

The new footage shows the extent of Lane's damage on Kauai, revealing one road after another inundated with muddy waters

The new footage shows the extent of Lane's damage on Kauai, revealing one road after another inundated with muddy waters

The new footage shows the extent of Lane's damage on Kauai, revealing one road after another inundated with muddy waters

While Lane moved away from the Hawaiian coast on Sunday, much of Kauai remained flooded until Tuesday.

While Lane moved away from the Hawaiian coast on Sunday, much of Kauai remained flooded until Tuesday.

While Lane moved away from the Hawaiian coast on Sunday, much of Kauai remained flooded until Tuesday.

"The most numerous downpours following Lane are expected to surpass the typical windward locations on Big Island and Maui County," AccuWeather senior meteorologist Brett Anderson reported.

But the windward areas of Oahu and Kauai will also be affected by localized downpours, which will cause possible flash floods.

Hawaii is also expected to be more humid than usual, which will put great pressure on cleanup efforts.

The drier air is expected to reach Hawaii later in the week and decrease the severity of expected rainfall.

And heavy rains on the island have only worsened flooded roads and highways, forcing more than 20 homes to be evacuated and schools closed.

And heavy rains on the island have only worsened flooded roads and highways, forcing more than 20 homes to be evacuated and schools closed.

And heavy rains on the island have only worsened flooded roads and highways, forcing more than 20 homes to be evacuated and schools closed.

The downpours are expected to continue this week, which forecasters warn could decelerate cleanup efforts across the state and even aggravate flooding.

The downpours are expected to continue this week, which forecasters warn could decelerate cleanup efforts across the state and even aggravate flooding.

The downpours are expected to continue this week, which forecasters warn could decelerate cleanup efforts across the state and even aggravate flooding.

While Lane did not break the all-time record for rainfall in the country, it does rank as the largest tropical cyclone rain in Hawaii after falling 52.02 inches of rain.

Hawaii's previous record was 52 inches measured during Hurricane Hiki in 1950.

It's still too early to quantify the extent of the damage, but it ranges from flooded homes to washed-out roads, said Kelly Wooten, spokeswoman for the Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency.

"We do not have numbers or statistics back yet," he said. The assessment teams began to inspect the damage on Sunday.

The storm caused damage mainly on the Isla Grande, where rivers roared near Hilo and nearly 40 people had to be rescued from their homes.

Lane ranks as the second largest storm surge in US history, behind Hurricane Harvey, which shed 60.58 inches of rain in Nederland, Texas. The images are flooded in Kauai on Monday

Lane ranks as the second largest storm surge in US history, behind Hurricane Harvey, which shed 60.58 inches of rain in Nederland, Texas. The images are flooded in Kauai on Monday

Lane ranks as the second largest storm surge in US history, behind Hurricane Harvey, which shed 60.58 inches of rain in Nederland, Texas. The images are flooded in Kauai on Monday

More rain this week could trigger new landslides and continue to threaten lives and property, forecasters warn. In the photo, the ducks paddling in front of a car partially submerged in Hilo, Hawaii on Saturday

More rain this week could trigger new landslides and continue to threaten lives and property, forecasters warn. In the photo, the ducks paddling in front of a car partially submerged in Hilo, Hawaii on Saturday

More rain this week could trigger new landslides and continue to threaten lives and property, forecasters warn. In the photo, the ducks paddling in front of a car partially submerged in Hilo, Hawaii on Saturday

FILE PHOTO: A retaining wall is on its side after being knocked down by a flood caused by Hurricane Lane in Hilo on Saturday

FILE PHOTO: A retaining wall is on its side after being knocked down by a flood caused by Hurricane Lane in Hilo on Saturday

FILE PHOTO: A retaining wall is on its side after being knocked down by a flood caused by Hurricane Lane in Hilo on Saturday

There were no deaths from the storm, which had the potential to cause much more destruction.

About 200 people have called to report damages, mainly on the east side of Big Island, said county administrative director Wil Okabe.

"What worries us is mold, when it goes into the drywall, the carpet, things like that," Okabe said.

The storm named Lane rushed toward the Hawaiian Islands as a powerful Category 5 hurricane early last week with maximum sustained winds of 160 mph.

But then it slowed down, moving at a speed of up to 2 mph at times.

On Sunday, state Senator Kai Kahele inspected flood damage at Waiakea Elementary School in Hilo on the Big Island.

A woman pushes her bicycle through the floods caused by Hurricane Lane in Hilo on Saturday. There were no deaths from the storm, which had the potential to cause much more destruction

A woman pushes her bicycle through the floods caused by Hurricane Lane in Hilo on Saturday. There were no deaths from the storm, which had the potential to cause much more destruction

A woman pushes her bicycle through the floods caused by Hurricane Lane in Hilo on Saturday. There were no deaths from the storm, which had the potential to cause much more destruction

About 200 people have called to report damages, mainly on the east side of the Big Island in Hawaii. In the photo is the water of the floods in Hilo on Saturday

About 200 people have called to report damages, mainly on the east side of the Big Island in Hawaii. In the photo is the water of the floods in Hilo on Saturday

About 200 people have called to report damages, mainly on the east side of the Big Island in Hawaii. In the photo is the water of the floods in Hilo on Saturday

Residents play in flood waters at a baseball field during the floods of Tropical Storm Lane on the Big Island on Saturday

Residents play in flood waters at a baseball field during the floods of Tropical Storm Lane on the Big Island on Saturday

Residents play in flood waters at a baseball field during the floods of Tropical Storm Lane on the Big Island on Saturday

Six classrooms for preschool, special education and kindergarten students were flooded, and the smell of mold was settling, he said.

"I think it reflects what you see in all of eastern Hawaii," he said.

"Four feet of water in three days overwhelmed even the best infrastructure and the best storm drains and plans."

The entire state was under flood surveillance until Tuesday.

"People just want the rain to stop," Kahele said. "People are tired of being wet."

Meteorologists continue to monitor a tropical system that is brewing near southwestern Mexico, which can approach Hawaii during the first week of September.

The storm named Lane rushed toward the Hawaiian Islands as a powerful Category 5 hurricane early last week with maximum sustained winds of 160 mph. But then it slowed down, moving at a speed of up to 2 mph

The storm named Lane rushed toward the Hawaiian Islands as a powerful Category 5 hurricane early last week with maximum sustained winds of 160 mph. But then it slowed down, moving at a speed of up to 2 mph

The storm named Lane rushed toward the Hawaiian Islands as a powerful Category 5 hurricane early last week with maximum sustained winds of 160 mph. But then it slowed down, moving at a speed of up to 2 mph

A resident carries his bodyboard through the waters of the flood, while practicing bodyboarding in the area for fun, during Tropical Storm Lane on the Big Island on Saturday

A resident carries his bodyboard through the waters of the flood, while practicing bodyboarding in the area for fun, during Tropical Storm Lane on the Big Island on Saturday

A resident carries his bodyboard through the waters of the flood, while practicing bodyboarding in the area for fun, during Tropical Storm Lane on the Big Island on Saturday

The Hawaiians have also been warned of additional threats from a developing El Niño child, which is expected to bring more rain to the state under normal conditions until October.

"Because El Niño is a feather with warmer than average water above the tropical Pacific Ocean, warm water can withstand more hurricanes than the average in the eastern and central Pacific," said AccuWeather chief meteorologist Alex Sosnowski.

& # 39;[This] it makes them stronger in nature and allows them to retain force for a longer period of time when they approach Hawaii. "

But not all is bad news. Tropical Storm Miriam is not expected to threaten Hawaii, as it strengthens in a hurricane this week.

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