Home Money Drivers’ traffic nightmare: Delays on motorways and A-roads are LONGER than they were pre-pandemic

Drivers’ traffic nightmare: Delays on motorways and A-roads are LONGER than they were pre-pandemic

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Traffic nightmares on England's busiest roads: The average delay time on motorways and main roads last year was 10.5 seconds per vehicle per mile. This is an increase from 9.3 seconds in 2022 and 9.5 seconds in 2019, before the coronavirus crisis, new data from the DfT shows.

Drivers are facing longer delays on England’s motorways and main roads than before the Covid pandemic, official Department for Transport figures confirmed today.

Statistics show that the average delay on the country’s busy strategic highway network last year was 10.5 seconds per vehicle mile (spvpm). This represents an increase compared to 9.3 seconds in 2022 and 9.5 seconds in 2019, before the coronavirus crisis.

The RAC called the data “very worrying” and urged the Government to provide “sufficient funding” to address the causes of rising congestion levels.

The car group said it is “struggling to see what the cause may be other than roadworks”, as it noted more people than ever are working from home and there is no growth in the number of cars on the roads.

Traffic nightmares on England's busiest roads: The average delay time on motorways and main roads last year was 10.5 seconds per vehicle per mile. This is an increase from 9.3 seconds in 2022 and 9.5 seconds in 2019, before the coronavirus crisis, new data from the DfT shows.

Traffic nightmares on England’s busiest roads: The average delay time on motorways and main roads last year was 10.5 seconds per vehicle per mile. This is an increase from 9.3 seconds in 2022 and 9.5 seconds in 2019, before the coronavirus crisis, new data from the DfT shows.

The DfT report says the pandemic “has had a “a marked impact on daily life, including congestion on the road network.”

He added: “As in previous years, most road traffic has returned to levels seen before the pandemic.”

However, delay times seen on England’s busiest routes have exceeded those seen in 2019.

The average delay time on England's strategic road network (SRN), which includes motorways and A-roads, has increased to 10.5 seconds per vehicle mile (spvm) in 2023. That is the highest average delay time ever before the pandemic and the longest in 8 years

The average delay time on England's strategic road network (SRN), which includes motorways and A-roads, has increased to 10.5 seconds per vehicle mile (spvm) in 2023. That is the highest average delay time ever before the pandemic and the longest in 8 years

The average delay time on England’s strategic road network (SRN), which includes motorways and A-roads, has increased to 10.5 seconds per vehicle mile (spvm) in 2023. That is the highest average delay time ever before the pandemic and the longest in 8 years

Coincidentally, the average speed traveled on national roads and highways fell to its lowest level in 2023, falling to just 90 km/h. Before the pandemic, the average speed was 58 mph

Coincidentally, the average speed traveled on national roads and highways fell to its lowest level in 2023, falling to just 90 km/h. Before the pandemic, the average speed was 58 mph

Coincidentally, the average speed traveled on national roads and highways fell to its lowest level in 2023, falling to just 90 km/h. Before the pandemic, the average speed was 90 km/h

Drivers traffic nightmare Delays on motorways and A roads are LONGER

Drivers traffic nightmare Delays on motorways and A roads are LONGER

Data collected by the department also revealed that the average speed on England’s main road network last year had fallen to 57mph, down from 58.1mph over the previous year and 58mph in 2019 before the pandemic.

And this cannot be attributed to more vehicles on the road. In fact, quite the opposite.

Separate DfT figures show the amount of traffic on British motorways last year (to September) was 1.4 per cent lower than 2019 levels, and on national roads it was 3.5 per cent. less vehicles.

The new traffic statistics released on Thursday show that increased congestion on local roads is costing commuters one minute per mile at rush hour.

Compared to 2022, when the UK was returning to pre-pandemic routines and workers began returning to the office, commuters are spending almost 5 per cent more time in morning traffic and 7.5 per cent more in the morning. evening.

This map of England shows which motorways and main roads, managed by National Highways, have the longest and shortest delays, based on 2023 figures.

This map of England shows which motorways and main roads, managed by National Highways, have the longest and shortest delays, based on 2023 figures.

This map of England shows which motorways and main roads, managed by National Highways, have the longest and shortest delays, based on 2023 figures.

1709824348 403 Drivers traffic nightmare Delays on motorways and A roads are LONGER

1709824348 403 Drivers traffic nightmare Delays on motorways and A roads are LONGER

The car group said it was “struggling to see what the cause could be other than roadworks”, as it noted more people than ever are working from home and there is no growth in the number of cars on the roads.

RAC head of policy Simon Williams said: “It is very worrying to see delays on our major roads increasing above pre-pandemic levels and average speeds falling.”

“With more people than ever working from home at least part of the week and no increase in the number of cars on the roads since then, we are struggling to see what the cause may be other than roadworks.

‘We are aware that safety concerns related to the all-lane smart motorway experiment have required extensive modernization of emergency refuge areas, which have limited capacity on these key routes.

‘While this is necessary, it is frustrating as it could have easily been avoided if the distance between them had not been quietly reduced as more plans were implemented over the years.

‘In light of today’s disappointing results, it is more important than ever that National Highways, which is responsible for the strategic road network, is given sufficient funding in the next five-year roads investment deal to tackle these issues head-on. .

“This is close to being agreed, so time is of the essence.”

Looking at the regional breakdown, year-on-year traffic delays hit drivers in the West the hardest. The average delay there increased from 8.1 seconds per mile in 2022 to 9.5 seconds last year, a 17 percent increase.

Looking at the regional breakdown, year-on-year traffic delays hit drivers in the West the hardest. The average delay there increased from 8.1 seconds per mile in 2022 to 9.5 seconds last year, a 17 percent increase.

Looking at the regional breakdown, year-on-year traffic delays hit drivers in the West the hardest. The average delay there increased from 8.1 seconds per mile in 2022 to 9.5 seconds last year, a 17 percent increase.

This map infographic shows the regional breakdown of average delay times in each area. Unsurprisingly, London has the longest delays on main roads, at 15.9 seconds per mile.

This map infographic shows the regional breakdown of average delay times in each area. London, unsurprisingly, has the longest delays on main roads, at 15.9 seconds per mile.

This map infographic shows the regional breakdown of average delay times in each area. London, unsurprisingly, has the longest delays on main roads, at 15.9 seconds per mile.

The DfT report also showed what the average speed was on motorways and A roads in each region of the UK.

The DfT report also showed what the average speed was on motorways and A roads in each region of the UK.

The DfT report also showed what the average speed was on motorways and A roads in each region of the UK.

Looking at the regional breakdown, year-on-year traffic delays hit drivers in the West the hardest.

The average delay there increased from 8.1 seconds per mile in 2022 to 9.5 seconds last year, a 17 percent increase.

Unsurprisingly, it is London motorists who spend the most time stuck in traffic.

The average delay in 2023 was 15.9 seconds per vehicle mile, up from 14.7 seconds the previous year.

Peak-hour travel chaos: Compared to 2022, when the UK was returning to pre-pandemic routines and workers began returning to the office, commuters are spending almost 5% more time in morning traffic and a 7.5% more at night.

Peak-hour travel chaos: Compared to 2022, when the UK was returning to pre-pandemic routines and workers began returning to the office, commuters are spending almost 5% more time in morning traffic and a 7.5% more at night.

Peak-hour travel chaos: Compared to 2022, when the UK was returning to pre-pandemic routines and workers began returning to the office, commuters are spending almost 5% more time in morning traffic and a 7.5% more at night.

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AVERAGE DELAYS ON HIGHWAYS AND ROADS AT RUSH HOURS (DfT)
Time frame 2022 Average delay (seconds per vehicle per mile) 2023 Average delay (seconds per vehicle per mile) % change from 2022
Weekday morning peak 53 seconds 55.5 seconds 4.7%
Night peak during the week 59.7 seconds 64.2 seconds 7.5%
Interpeak during the week 49.1 seconds 51.2 seconds 4.3%
Working days outside of high season 23.3 seconds 24.1 seconds 3.4%

The AA believes the increase in traffic delays is due to a combination of factors.

‘The inflexibility and cost of public transport, not to mention strikes, and the fact that people are forced to move away from the city to find affordable housing are reasons that only scratch the surface of why commuters and others Travelers are willing to sit in their cars and watch their time disappear,’ explained AA spokesman Luke Bosdet.

“It doesn’t have to be this way, as demonstrated by the astonishing success of Cambridge’s Park and Ride system – a system that converts millions of car trips into bus trips every year. Because? Because car parks and bus services are located in the right place, at the right time and, above all, at the right price.

‘Other councils ridicule their car travelers for a situation created by poor planning, poor investment and lack of imagination.

“Worse still, some have considered or are contemplating turning congestion into a source of revenue through levies on workplace parking, i.e. a jobs tax.”

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