Drive Q + A as an audience EXPLODES on Australia’s reaction to Covid-19 – who do you agree with?

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“How do they live with themselves?” Furious feud erupts over Q + A as the audience EXPLODES to panelists over controversial Covid comments – but who do you agree with?

  • Q + A Audience Member Launched In Two High-profile Anti-Lockdown Experts
  • Journalist Adam Creighton asked how he could live with himself over commentary
  • Creighton said he would ‘be all right’ now that his father’s life is over at the age of 65
  • He declined to comment, but called the national Covid response disproportionate
  • Economist Gigi Foster said lockdowns forget “everything else that matters.”

A furious feud has broken out over Q + A after an onlooker tore into two high-profile panelists questioning Australia’s response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Both The Australian’s economics editor Adam Creighton and UNSW economist Gigi Foster were targets of their anti-lockdown stance on Thursday’s episode.

Spectator Louise Ihlein claimed that the experts downplayed the virus’s impact by suggesting ‘when people turn 60, their lives are all but over’.

“ And then I saw Adam say similar things on and on Twitter a few times last year, about his dad being 65 and it was going to be okay, ” the 60-year-old said.

Ms. Ihlein – who has an illness that she said would ‘not get her better’ – said it was ‘shameful’ to suggest that people over a certain age were worthless.

Australian economic editor Adam Creighton has been forced to defend himself against severe criticism from a Q + A audience member over his stance on Australia's Covid-19 lockdowns.

Australian economic editor Adam Creighton has been forced to defend himself against severe criticism from a Q + A audience member over his stance on Australia’s Covid-19 lockdowns.

“I wanted to ask them how they could live with themselves after the comments they made last year,” she said in a video question submitted to the show.

‘I hope they never have to be seen as the other during their journey through life. And I want to know how they propose to give sick and disabled people a better life, a good life?

Poll

Has Australia’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic been proportionate?

  • Yes – lockdowns have saved lives 155 votes
  • No – it ruined the economy 66 votes

“I want to know, do they want me to get rid of it?”

Creighton said he never made the comment attributed to him about his father.

“About that last point around 65 and about my dad – I never said that, that was actually someone else,” he said.

He said he and Ms. Foster had never said that people over 60 were not worth the inconvenience of social distance restrictions, adding that this would be a “ shocking claim. ”

‘We just argued for what was the consensus of science at the end of 2019, which is that you take a rational approach to a pandemic and don’t close everything and don’t force people to do things and don’t do that’ ‘I drag she’s screaming from cars at the border, ‘he said.

Travelers with face masks at Tullamarine Airport in Melbourne on Jan. 8.  Australia has lost 909 lives to the coronavirus, compared to more than 545,000 in the US.

Travelers with face masks at Tullamarine Airport in Melbourne on Jan. 8.  Australia has lost 909 lives to the coronavirus, compared to more than 545,000 in the US.

Travelers with face masks at Tullamarine Airport in Melbourne on Jan. 8. Australia has lost 909 lives to the coronavirus, compared to more than 545,000 in the US.

‘You don’t close borders and hospitals for months to all other patients, you don’t stop traveling.

‘I’m not an extreme libertarian at all. But this is extraordinary what has happened in the past year. ‘

Australia has lost 909 lives to the coronavirus – compared to more than 545,000 in the US – but has been subject to repeated state border blockades in a handful of cases of community COVID-19 transmission in recent months.

Ms. Foster also stressed that she would never say that a person’s life after the age of 60 is “not worth living.”

“This was a great opportunity for me to see people in action totally captivated by one thing that can hurt people, which is COVID, and forget about everything else that matters in a normal time,” she said.

Economics professor Gigi Foster said Australia's response to Covid-19 forgot 'about everything else that matters in a normal time'

Economics professor Gigi Foster said Australia's response to Covid-19 forgot 'about everything else that matters in a normal time'

Economics professor Gigi Foster said Australia’s response to Covid-19 forgot ‘about everything else that matters in a normal time’

“I was willing to speak it out and I’m proud that I did because there were very few voices in Australia telling a sensible, healthy story despite the hysteria that gripped the world.”

Australia has fared well with the pandemic compared to most other countries, with only 909 deaths compared to 545,000 in the US.

But the response has been plagued by problems, most notably the continued closure of state lines, as prime ministers pledged to keep the virus out of their communities.

The controversial measure has separated families for months and devastated the domestic tourism industry.

Meanwhile, lockdowns have also wreaked havoc on the economy, with the Melbourne lockdown alone costing about $ 12 billion.

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