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‘Driest May ever’ will continue with Britain this weekend for the scorching 82F sunshine

Britons are ready for a scorching 82F (28C) of sunshine this weekend in what could be the ‘driest May ever’ as chances of June are lowered as the hottest ever.

Today, the mercury will widely hit 77F to 81F (25C to 27C) and possibly 82F (28C) in more remote places as the restrictions on locking across the country are eased.

Temperatures could reach 84F (29C) tomorrow, with the sweltering conditions causing firefighter warnings that undergrowth could burst into flames ‘almost anywhere’ as many regions have not seen noticeable rain for weeks.

It is because parts of the UK will be forecast for the driest May to date, leaving water board leaders anxiously monitoring reservoir levels as the UK countryside quickly becomes bone dry.

Brits are ready for a scorching 82F (28C) of sunshine this weekend in what could be the 'driest May ever'. Pictured: Je Han and her daughter Sofie, four, walk through a field of poppies near the coastal fort at Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland

Brits are ready for a scorching 82F (28C) of sunshine this weekend in what could be the ‘driest May ever’. Pictured: Je Han and her daughter Sofie, four, walk through a field of poppies near the coastal fort at Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland

A dried up Jumbles reservoir in Bradshaw, Bolton, Greater Manchester. The United Utilities reservoir, completed in 1971, is located in the north of the city. In April, the North West of England received only 30 percent of the region's LTA rainfall

A dried up Jumbles reservoir in Bradshaw, Bolton, Greater Manchester. The United Utilities reservoir, completed in 1971, is located in the north of the city. In April, the North West of England received only 30 percent of the region's LTA rainfall

A dried up Jumbles reservoir in Bradshaw, Bolton, Greater Manchester. The United Utilities reservoir, completed in 1971, is located in the north of the city. In April, the North West of England received only 30 percent of the region’s LTA rainfall

A map of the Met Office, shown, shows that tempreatures could reach 81F (27C). The blistering conditions have led to firefighter warnings that undergrowth could burst into flames 'almost anywhere'

A map of the Met Office, shown, shows that tempreatures could reach 81F (27C). The blistering conditions have led to firefighter warnings that undergrowth could burst into flames 'almost anywhere'

A map of the Met Office, shown, shows that tempreatures could reach 81F (27C). The blistering conditions have led to firefighter warnings that undergrowth could burst into flames ‘almost anywhere’

Shocking photos show the devastating impact of the heat wave in the UK on one reservoir – about to dry up completely.

Jumbles Reservoir in Bolton, Greater Manchester, is normally filled with hundreds of millions of gallons of water. But photos taken yesterday show declining water levels and deep cracks forged into the bone-dry desert-like landscape.

Only 14 percent of average rainfall has fallen in the northwest this month, with just 11 mm to May 19. Experts predict that prolonged warm weather could lead to the country’s driest May in over a century.

Between the beginning of the month and May 25, the UK has seen as much as 103 percent of its usual sunshine, according to the Met Office.

Meanwhile, the Country Landowners’ Association begged the public to take extra care following a wave of wildfires, including a massive fire that devastated a forest on Anglesey off the North Wales coast Tuesday morning.

A spokesman said, “Warm, dry and settled conditions have an increased wildfire condition. According to the latest figures from the Environment Agency, there were an average of 24 dry days (0.2 mm of recorded rainfall or less per day) in the Southeast last month, and it was the sunniest April ever.

May continued the trend, with only five percent of long-term average rainfall last week. Dry conditions are likely to continue in the coming weeks, with the medium-term forecast predicting a prolonged period of above-average sunshine and below-average rainfall. ‘

The spokesperson added, “Wildfires have the potential to destroy farmland and wildlife, and also pose a risk to the lives of people living and working in rural and neighboring communities.

A dried up Jumbles reservoir in Bolton, Greater Manchester, with a boulder-strewn shoreline and cracked mud. The area around the reservoir is popular with walkers who exercise during the coronavirus closure

A dried up Jumbles reservoir in Bolton, Greater Manchester, with a boulder-strewn shoreline and cracked mud. The area around the reservoir is popular with walkers who exercise during the coronavirus closure

A dried up Jumbles reservoir in Bolton, Greater Manchester, with a boulder-strewn shoreline and cracked mud. The area around the reservoir is popular with walkers who exercise during the coronavirus closure

The dried up reservoir in Bolton, Greater Manchester. Only 11mm of rain has fallen in this month until May 19, which could be the driest May as the blistering conditions will continue over the weekend

The dried up reservoir in Bolton, Greater Manchester. Only 11mm of rain has fallen in this month until May 19, which could be the driest May as the blistering conditions will continue over the weekend

The dried up reservoir in Bolton, Greater Manchester. Only 11mm of rain has fallen in this month until May 19, which could be the driest May as the blistering conditions will continue over the weekend

The cracked mud can be seen through a trickle from a feeder in the dried up reservoir in Bolton, Greater Manchester. Between the beginning of the month and May 25, the UK has seen a staggering 103 percent of its usual sunshine

The cracked mud can be seen through a trickle from a feeder in the dried up reservoir in Bolton, Greater Manchester. Between the beginning of the month and May 25, the UK has seen a staggering 103 percent of its usual sunshine

The cracked mud can be seen through a trickle from a feeder in the dried up reservoir in Bolton, Greater Manchester. Between the beginning of the month and May 25, the UK has seen a staggering 103 percent of its usual sunshine

Jumbles Reservoir in Greater Manchester is normally packed with hundreds of millions of gallons of water. But photos above show declining water levels and deep cracks forged in the bone-dry desert-like landscape

Jumbles Reservoir in Greater Manchester is normally packed with hundreds of millions of gallons of water. But photos above show declining water levels and deep cracks forged in the bone-dry desert-like landscape

Jumbles Reservoir in Greater Manchester is normally packed with hundreds of millions of gallons of water. But photos above show declining water levels and deep cracks forged in the bone-dry desert-like landscape

Forest fires can be prevented by not throwing away cigarettes or other smoldering material. The same goes for litter, since bottles and shards of glass can often cause a fire. ‘

He said disposable picnic barbecues in the countryside can also light up light for barrel-dry undergrowth.

“Barbecues should only take place in sheltered areas far from flammable materials and then be extinguished well.”

Oli Claydon of The Met Office said the ‘warm and settled conditions’ are caused by high pressure just east of the UK, describing it as ‘homegrown heat’ with a ‘little influence from the south’.

He told MailOnline: “It has certainly been a very dry spring and May for many parts, especially England and Wales, especially in the south. Not much rain is predicted between now and the end of May, so some regions may be on track for the driest May. ‘

The forecaster predicted that temperatures will reach 82F (28C) in some parts today, peaking at 84F (29C) tomorrow and slightly declining on Sunday, but remaining warm and sunny.

Two people walk around the loch at Linlithgow Palace, West Lothian, on a sunny spring morning. Bookmaker Coral narrowed the chances of a record warm June to 5-4, and also said it's 1-2 that there's a hose ban somewhere in the UK this summer

Two people walk around the loch at Linlithgow Palace, West Lothian, on a sunny spring morning. Bookmaker Coral narrowed the chances of a record warm June to 5-4, and also said it's 1-2 that there's a hose ban somewhere in the UK this summer

Two people walk around the loch at Linlithgow Palace, West Lothian, on a sunny spring morning. Bookmaker Coral narrowed the chances of a record warm June to 5-4, and also said it’s 1-2 that there’s a hose ban somewhere in the UK this summer

A general view of an access to a children's playground in Blackwood, Wales, where access restrictions have been in place since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. The government continues to mitigate the closure

A general view of an access to a children's playground in Blackwood, Wales, where access restrictions have been in place since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. The government continues to mitigate the closure

A general view of an access to a children’s playground in Blackwood, Wales, where access restrictions have been in place since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. The government continues to mitigate the closure

A general view of a bowling alley in Blackwood, Wales is watered. Bowls in Wales have been a limited sport since the start of the lockdown, but may be played in England with certain social distance restrictions

A general view of a bowling alley in Blackwood, Wales is watered. Bowls in Wales have been a limited sport since the start of the lockdown, but may be played in England with certain social distance restrictions

A general view of a bowling alley in Blackwood, Wales is watered. Bowls in Wales have been a limited sport since the start of the lockdown, but may be played in England with certain social distance restrictions

He said: ‘If we go in tomorrow, the highest temperatures move slightly so northern Scotland for the highest temperatures, 26-28C (79-82F) probably in some parts, especially in the Moray Firth area, could be 29C (84F) due to a meteorological effect called the Foehn effect, which has to do with how the wind interacts with the ridges and pushes temperatures up in one place.

More generally in terms of temperatures elsewhere, in the low to mid 20s, away from the east coast 25C (77F) to 26C (79F), possibly 27C (81F) in parts, the highest temperatures in the north of Scotland would be 29C (84F) ) to see possible. London at 23C (73F).

It’s a fairly similar story for Saturday with the Northwest and possibly Moray Firth above, 26C (79F) to 28C (82F) on Saturday, but generally 22C (72F) to 25C (77F) inland.

Then the highest temperatures drop slightly for Sunday, so western parts of Wales for the highest temperatures, northwestern England and western Wales drop 25C (77F) to 27C (81F) on Sunday.

“Generally still bright, sunny, controlled conditions from 22C (72F) to 24C (75F), London at about 25C (77F), so a little warmer.”

Bookmaker Coral has also narrowed the chances of a record warm June to 5-4, also saying it’s 1-2 that there is a hose ban all over the UK this summer.

Coral’s John Hill said, ‘With a prolonged dry spell on the way, it wouldn’t come as a surprise if a hose ban is imposed on many parts of the UK this summer.

Sunrise at Hythe Marina on Southampton Water this morning. Britain has been in warm temperatures and glorious sunshine for the past few weeks, but this could change as low pressure seems to subside Monday night

Sunrise at Hythe Marina on Southampton Water this morning. Britain has been in warm temperatures and glorious sunshine for the past few weeks, but this could change as low pressure seems to subside Monday night

Sunrise at Hythe Marina on Southampton Water this morning. Britain has been in warm temperatures and glorious sunshine for the past few weeks, but this could change as low pressure seems to subside Monday night

A general view of a training area in Blackwood, Wales, where access restrictions remain in place since the pandemic srat. It is because schools will open for the reception from 1 June, year one and year six students

A general view of a training area in Blackwood, Wales, where access restrictions remain in place since the pandemic srat. It is because schools will open for the reception from 1 June, year one and year six students

A general view of a training area in Blackwood, Wales, where access restrictions remain in place since the pandemic srat. It is because schools will open for the reception from 1 June, year one and year six students

The sunrise at Hythe Marina on Southampton Water this morning. The Met Office predicted temperatures in some parts will reach 82F (28C) today, peak at 84F (29C) tomorrow and drop a bit on Sunday, but remain warm and sunny

The sunrise at Hythe Marina on Southampton Water this morning. The Met Office predicted temperatures in some parts will reach 82F (28C) today, peak at 84F (29C) tomorrow and drop a bit on Sunday, but remain warm and sunny

The sunrise at Hythe Marina on Southampton Water this morning. The Met Office predicted temperatures in some parts will reach 82F (28C) today, peak at 84F (29C) tomorrow and drop a bit on Sunday, but remain warm and sunny

“Chances are we’re ready for a record-breaking hot summer, and it could come very early, as chances for a record hot June have also narrowed.”

Meanwhile, BBC’s Matt Taylor predicted, “If your garden is desperate for rain right now – none of the predictions for the rest of this month and certainly beyond today. A day of blue skies from sunrise to sunset in many parts.

“The only cloud we’ve seen all over East England has come through the afternoon.”

Referring to tomorrow’s conditions, Mr. Taylor said: “For most sunny days, a little more wind from the east or southeast, so where the wind is from the sea, temperatures will be in the teenage years, most although wide in the 20s – 25C (77F) to 27C (81F) in the west, 26C (79F) in northwest Scotland could hit a good 10-12C (50-54F) where we should be before the time of years.

“And with high pressure across Scandinavia, the flow of dry air from the nearby continent, we’re keeping weather fronts and clouds out of the Atlantic this weekend, so it’s going to be a sunny weekend.

“That will certainly be the case on Saturday, bright sun across the board. However, what you’ll notice on Saturday is a bit more of a breeze blowing across the country, and where that breeze from the sea is, those eastern coastal provinces and especially Eastern Northern Ireland, temperatures generally in the teenage years, the most however in the 1920s, 27C (81F) or 28C (82F) may be to the west.

Sunday may be a bit cooler again in Scotland and some other eastern areas with that wind coming from the sea, but hottest of all still heading towards the west of England and Wales, where 26C (79F) or 27C (81F) may is if the dry story continues anyway early next week. ‘

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