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A sports scientist has revealed the five most common dietary errors that Australians make - and the five foods he always has in his pantry

A sports scientist has revealed the common dietary errors that Australians make that cause much more harm than good.

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Drew Harrisberg, 29, a physical therapist from Sydney, has spent years researching scientifically based evidence and knows exactly what a nutritious diet is for a healthy, well-functioning body.

From eating too much protein to a lack of fiber, these are the five mistakes Drew says that Australians make every day that can harm their overall health.

A sports scientist has revealed the five most common dietary errors that Australians make - and the five foods he always has in his pantry

A sports scientist has revealed the five most common dietary errors that Australians make – and the five foods he always has in his pantry

1. Eating too much packaged / processed food

A popular diet trend within the fitness / bodybuilding community is & # 39; if it fits your macro & # 39; s & # 39; (IIFYM) or flexible diet.

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& # 39; The general premise of IIFYM is that as long as you reach a calorie deficit (burn more calories than you store) and hit your targeted macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates, fat), you can achieve fat loss and get into good physical shape regardless the food you eat, & Drew told FEMAIL.

& # 39; Of course, it can get you ready for the stage for a bodybuilding show, but that doesn't mean it's healthy – it's a reductionist approach that focuses on food quantity rather than food quality.

Drew Harrisberg, 29, an exercise physiologist from Sydney, has spent years researching scientific evidence and knows exactly what a nutritious diet is for a healthy body

Drew Harrisberg, 29, an exercise physiologist from Sydney, has spent years researching scientific evidence and knows exactly what a nutritious diet is for a healthy body

Drew Harrisberg, 29, an exercise physiologist from Sydney, has spent years researching scientific evidence and knows exactly what a nutritious diet is for a healthy body

& # 39; The selling point is that it is not restrictive and allows flexibility in food and & # 39; everything in moderation & # 39 ;.

& # 39; Proponents of IIFYM say you can get fragmented with a diet of pop-tarts, whey protein shakes, hamburgers, and pizzas as long as you hit your macro & # 39; s and reach a calorie deficit.

& # 39; This may be true, but if you were to wear your body inside out, I doubt it would look very attractive. & # 39;

Which foods does Drew always have in its pantry?

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1. Whole grain (buckwheat, GF oats, quinoa, brown rice)

2. Legumes (beans, lentils, chickpeas)

3. Vegetable protein powder

4. Nut butter

5. Dark chocolate

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2. Eating too much animal food

Due to the recent trend of high-fat foods (LCHF, keto and carnivore), foods such as bacon, eggs, and butter have made their way back to our plates even in our cups as basic breakfast ingredients.

Drew says this can be a major health issue for us.

& # 39; Worrying is that processed meat has been classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a group 1 carcinogen (known to cause cancer) and is in the same group as asbestos and smoking, & # 39; Drew said.

& # 39; Just because you can lose weight by drinking bacon, eggs, coconut oil, cheese, and butter does not mean that it is healthy in the long run. We have lost sight of the lifespan and health outage due to the desire for 6-pack abs.

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& # 39; It is a short-sighted approach to health and well-being. & # 39;

& # 39; Just because you can lose weight by drinking bacon, eggs, coconut oil, cheese, and butter, this doesn't mean it's healthy in the long run, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; Just because you can lose weight by drinking bacon, eggs, coconut oil, cheese, and butter, this doesn't mean it's healthy in the long run, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; Just because you can lose weight by drinking bacon, eggs, coconut oil, cheese, and butter, this doesn't mean it's healthy in the long run, & # 39; he said.

Drew said he also witnessed online conversations about & # 39; demonizing & # 39; of carbohydrates such as fruit as the cause of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

If you care about your health, a predominantly vegetable diet is the way of the future.

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& # 39; They even went so far as to say that table sugar should be grouped in the same category as a blueberry, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; & # 39; It is a scandalous claim that goes against the vast majority of evidence and is a dangerous message at a time when we need to encourage people to eat more fruits and vegetables and less processed meat.

& # 39; Animal farming (factory farming) is a highly inefficient food system that consumes the resources of the earth. It is also bad for human health, planetary health and happens to be very cruel from an ethical perspective.

& # 39; If we were all to limit our animal intake or at least strive for more sustainable and ethical practices, the planet and ourselves would be better for that. & # 39;

Drew & # 39; s current favorite routine is a session at 12RND fitness where he does boxing workouts

Drew & # 39; s current favorite routine is a session at 12RND fitness where he does boxing workouts

Drew's current favorite routine is a session on 12RND fitness where he does boxing training

What are Drew's favorite workouts?

Sometimes I program them myself in the gym, but my current favorite is a session with 12RND fitness.

I like the fact that I can appear at any time (within opening hours) and break a well-programmed workout, because it's fun, a new lap starts every 3 minutes, so there are no fixed class times.

It is a full-body workout with a focus on boxing. The structure of the training mimics a 12-round championship boxing title fight, i.e. 12x 3-minute rounds with 30 seconds of rest between rounds.

3. Don't eat enough fiber

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According to Drew, fiber is the forgotten & # 39; nutrient & # 39; become.

& # 39; The majority of people are nowhere near the recommended daily amount of fiber. "It is essential to build and maintain a healthy microbiome in the gut," Drew said.

& # 39; Fiber is prebiotic, meaning that it is the food that nourishes our gut bacteria and a healthy microbiome is a great way to reduce the risk of chronic diseases, improve immune function and improve overall well-being.

& # 39; Again, craze diets that promote the most calories from animal foods are high in fiber.

& # 39; On the other hand, a predominantly whole plant-based diet with an abundance of diversity is a great way to optimize gut health. Foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, and fermented foods are all great ways to increase fiber intake. & # 39;

According to Drew, fiber is the forgotten & # 39; nutrient & # 39; become
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According to Drew, fiber is the forgotten & # 39; nutrient & # 39; become

According to Drew, fiber is the forgotten & # 39; nutrient & # 39; become

4. Eating too much protein

The recommended daily intake of proteins is 0.8 – 1.2 g / kg, so according to this calculation, a 60 kg woman needs only 48-72 g of protein per day.

This range would change depending on age, body weight, muscle mass, activity levels and gender.

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& # 39; If you are a very physically active person who participates in regular resistance training and breaks down many muscles, you may want to bring your protein intake to the top of the range, & # 39; Drew said.

& # 39; If you are an athlete or a performance-oriented individual, you may benefit from going as high as 1.5 to 2 g / kg, but for the average man or girl, the RDA is more than enough to keep you healthy. & # 39;

Drew said that people who eat animal food with every meal and use whey protein supplements are missing this recommendation for daily intake and & # 39; unnecessary amounts & # 39; consume protein.

What is Drew & # 39; s day on a plate?

Breakfast: Avocado on toast (pumpkin and turmeric bread) with a salad of greenery, balsamic vinegar, pumpkin, chickpeas, tempeh and nutritional yeast

Lunch: A Buddha bowl with a grain, a non-starchy vegetable such as broccoli, a protein source, a starchy vegetable, a pinch of nutritional yeast and dark leafy vegetables

After training: A smoothie bowl made from frozen fruit, almond milk, vegetable protein powder, hemp seeds, chia seed, linseed flour, walnuts or mixed nuts / granola

Dinner: Another Buddha dish or in the winter a homemade curry served with quinoa or wild rice

snacks: Fresh fruit, mixed nuts or date bombs (a pitted Medjool date filled with a teaspoon of peanut butter and a square of dark chocolate)

Drew says that if animal protein is the hero of your plate with every meal (especially grain-fed, factory-bred animals), you might do more harm than good

Drew says that if animal protein is the hero of your plate with every meal (especially grain-fed, factory-bred animals), you might do more harm than good

Drew says that if animal protein is the hero of your plate with every meal (especially grain-fed, factory-bred animals), you might do more harm than good

& # 39; Research has shown that 25 grams of a high-quality protein source can stimulate muscle protein synthesis to the same extent as 60 grams of protein. So just because some are good doesn't mean more is better, & Drew said.

& # 39; Protein became sexy because it was marketed as a muscle-building nutrient for weight loss (I am astonished how both can be). Although protein is needed for cellular repair and muscle growth, the amount needed to build up enough muscle mass is less than most people think.

& # 39; Research shows that animal proteins activate IGF1 and mTOR that cause an increase in muscle growth, but the same two pathways are also associated with an increased risk of cancer and accelerated aging. & # 39;

So, Drew says, if animal protein is the hero of your plate with every meal (especially grain-fed, factory-bred animals), then you might do more harm than good.

& # 39; I'm not saying that everyone should be 100 percent vegetable, but a predominantly vegetable diet is a good option & he says

& # 39; I'm not saying that everyone should be 100 percent vegetable, but a predominantly vegetable diet is a good option & he says

& # 39; I'm not saying that everyone should be 100 percent vegetable, but a predominantly vegetable diet is a good option & he says

5. Do not eat enough vegetable food

"A predominantly whole plant-based diet based on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds is high in fiber, water, micronutrients and antioxidants and happens to be a very satiating way of eating," Drew said.

& # 39; I am not saying that everyone should be 100 percent vegetable, but a mainly vegetable diet is a good option.

& # 39; By shifting the balance from animals from the majority to mainly plants (80:20 or even 90:10), you eat in a way that is geared to the longest living populations in human history, also called the blue Zones. & # 39;

According to Drew, people live in the & # 39; blue zones & # 39; longer than any other population around the world and they have the least amount of chronic diseases.

& # 39; If you care about your health, environmental sustainability, and animal welfare, a predominantly plant-based diet is the way of the future & he said.

& # 39; Blue zone populations also have lower BMIs, indicating that they can effortlessly maintain a healthy body weight without counting calories or restricting their food intake.

& # 39; A vegetable diet is a very satiating and very nutritious way of eating. It is very difficult to eat calories on a WFPB diet because it is naturally high in fiber, low in calories and nutritious. & # 39;

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