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Incredible black-and-white photos show the background behind the scenes of an early episode of Doctor Who, starring the First Doctor William Hartnell (center). A candid photo of the set shows actors John Maxim, Frankenstein's monster (left), and Malcolm Rogers as Count Dracula (right) pretending to attack the sci-fi hero

Behind the scenes of Doctor Who & # 39; s earliest adventures: black and white photos from William Hartnell's time in the Tardis show actors transforming into giant ants in 1965 and a producer enjoying a cunning cigarette lit by a mechanoid

  • Photos & # 39; s show behind the scenes the production of an episode of Doctor Who called The Web Planet
  • The first episode was broadcast on the BBC in February 1965 and included the first physician William Hartnell
  • A candid photo shows Hartnell with co-stars John Maxim and Malcolm Rogers who pretend to attack him
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Incredible black-and-white photos reveal behind-the-scenes production of the earliest episodes of BBC Doctor Who when it was first broadcast in the 1960s.

One of the photos shows the First Doctor, the late William Hartnell at a candid moment with fellow stars John Maxim, who plays Frankenstein's monster, and Malcolm Rogers as Count Dracula pretending to attack him.

The recently excavated image comes from an episode from May 1965, which was recorded at the BBC Riverside Studios in Hammersmith.

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Incredible black-and-white photos show the background behind the scenes of an early episode of Doctor Who, starring the First Doctor William Hartnell (center). A candid photo of the set shows actors John Maxim, Frankenstein's monster (left), and Malcolm Rogers as Count Dracula (right) pretending to attack the sci-fi hero

Incredible black-and-white photos show the background behind the scenes of an early episode of Doctor Who, starring the First Doctor William Hartnell (center). A candid photo of the set shows actors John Maxim, Frankenstein's monster (left), and Malcolm Rogers as Count Dracula (right) pretending to attack the sci-fi hero

Show more images Hartnell features in the images as the first physician in the episode The Web Planet, first aired in February 1965.

The show's producer, Verity Lambert, was also shown getting a cheeky light for her cigarette from the Mechanoid when a flame burst out.

Another photo shows a Mechanoid, a large spherical robot made by humans and the many enemies of the Doctor, aiming and shooting at three opposing Daleks, who are also enemies of the Doctor.

Producer of the show, Verity Lambert (photo), was also shown to get a cheeky light for her cigarette from a Mechanoid when a flame burst out

Producer of the show, Verity Lambert (photo), was also shown to get a cheeky light for her cigarette from a Mechanoid when a flame burst out

Producer of the show, Verity Lambert (photo), was also shown to get a cheeky light for her cigarette from a Mechanoid when a flame burst out

Another photo shows a Mechanoid (right), a large spherical robot made by humans and the many enemies of the Doctor, aiming and filming at three opposite Daleks (left)
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Another photo shows a Mechanoid (right), a large spherical robot made by humans and the many enemies of the Doctor, aiming and filming at three opposite Daleks (left)

Another photo shows a Mechanoid (right), a large spherical robot made by humans and the many enemies of the Doctor, aiming and filming at three opposite Daleks (left)

More behind the scenes show images that actors come in their elaborate costume as insectoid species named Zarbi, which resembled giant ants.

The set shows a costume designer with which an actor can climb into the legs of the ensemble hanging on his shoulders.

In other images, more permanent staff help actors to get into their Zarbi costumes.

More behind the scenes show images that actors end up in their costly costumes as insectoid species named Zarbi, who resembled giant ants
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More behind the scenes show images that actors end up in their costly costumes as insectoid species named Zarbi, who resembled giant ants

The set shows a costume designer with which an actor can climb into the legs of the ensemble hanging on his shoulders

The set shows a costume designer with which an actor can climb into the legs of the ensemble hanging on his shoulders

More behind the scenes, images show that actors end up in their costly costumes as insectosoid species called Zarbi, which resembled giant ants. The set shows a costume designer with which an actor can climb into the legs of the ensemble hanging on his shoulders

In other images, more permanent staff help actors to get into their Zarbi costumes

In other images, more permanent staff help actors to get into their Zarbi costumes

In other images, more permanent staff help actors to get into their Zarbi costumes

The large headgear seemed to be the most difficult part of the ensemble, as actors seemed to have shocks on their shoulders and were tied with a belt around their bodies - a far cry from the special effects in recent episodes of the series
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The large headgear seemed to be the most difficult part of the ensemble, as actors seemed to have shocks on their shoulders and were tied with a belt around their bodies - a far cry from the special effects in recent episodes of the series

The large headgear seemed to be the most difficult part of the ensemble, as actors seemed to have shocks on their shoulders and were tied with a belt around their bodies – a far cry from the special effects in recent episodes of the series

Each Zarbi head also contained beaded eyes and tongs, while the costume also had four legs, two human-like legs and a guest-scared-looking look to make children shake behind the couch

Each Zarbi head also contained beaded eyes and tongs, while the costume also had four legs, two human-like legs and a guest-scared-looking look to make children shake behind the couch

Each Zarbi head also contained beaded eyes and tongs, while the costume also had four legs, two human-like legs and a guest-scared-looking look to make children shake behind the couch

The large headgear seemed to be the most difficult part of the ensemble as actors seemed to have shocks on their shoulders and were tied with a belt around their bodies – a far cry from the special effects in recent episodes of the series.

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Each Zarbi head also contained beaded eyes and tongs, while the costume also had four legs, two human-like legs and a guest-scared-looking look to make children shake behind the couch.

Also photographed is a scene with the TARDIS (time and relative dimension in space) that appears to have crashed on the planet Vortis, the home of the Zarbi.

Also photographed is a scene with the TARDIS (time and relative dimension in space) that appears to have crashed on the planet Vortis, home of the Zarbi.

Also photographed is a scene with the TARDIS (time and relative dimension in space) that appears to have crashed on the planet Vortis, home of the Zarbi.

Also photographed is a scene with the TARDIS (time and relative dimension in space) that appears to have crashed on the planet Vortis, home of the Zarbi.

In this image, an actor shows the full scale of the anty Zarbi costume on the set of Doctor Who

In this image, an actor shows the full scale of the anty Zarbi costume on the set of Doctor Who

In this image, an actor shows the full scale of the anty Zarbi costume on the set of Doctor Who

Doctor Who has been produced by the BBC since 1963 and when it was first released, it was intended as a regular weekly program broadcast on Saturday night.

Originally running for 26 seasons from November 23, 1963 to December 6, 1989, it was intended as an educational family visit show to tell its younger audience about history as the doctor traveled through time with his companions, a history and science teacher. .

William Hartnell was the first physician and played the role from 1963 to 1966, starring in 137 episodes.

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