But it is also an undeniable fact that many of us start getting a little thin as we get older

But it is also an undeniable fact that many of us start getting a little thin as we get older

But it is also an undeniable fact that many of us start to get on top as we get older

Summer, a time for barbecues, vacations and stripping down to the smallest detail. It is also the time of year when people probably say the word & # 39; hair loss & # 39; in Google, according to a recent study. There is a reason for this: many of us will become thinner in the summer. But my message is: don't panic.

Before I explain why, it is important to understand how her & # 39; works & # 39 ;. One hair grows for three to five years. Then it falls out and the follicle comes about three months before the cycle starts again at a resting stage.

Although it is not fully understood why, a larger number of follicles stay asleep in the summer longer, according to researchers. The growth cycle accelerates again during winter and spring. In addition, some studies have suggested that we lose up to twice the number of hairs in the summer compared to the colder months.

So the balance tips. More hairs fall out than grow, making the hair appear thinner. Strangely enough, the rate of hair growth decreases in summer and winter – so although we have fewer hairs, what we have grows faster.

Other major causes of temporary hair loss are poor nutrition – dieting, if not done carefully, can delay new hair growth. Long-term illness, major operations, certain medicines and stress are also triggers.

As the hair gradually falls out, the thinning is only noticed months later, which also disrupts interference with the new growth cycle – and therefore it often seems puzzling. But for many people it's just a blip. When life returns to normal, the hair growth cycle also increases.

My point is that hair loss is very common. And often it's not a sign that we're going to be bald.

But it is also an undeniable fact that many of us start to get on top as we get older. Ignoring seasonal changes, when we are young, new hairs grow about as fast as we lose them. But as we get older, the hair still sheds, but more follicles remain dormant or thinner hairs.

Although baldness is more common in men, 40 percent of women have visible hair loss at the age of 40 (stock image)

Although baldness is more common in men, 40 percent of women have visible hair loss at the age of 40 (stock image)

Although baldness is more common in men, 40 percent of women have visible hair loss at the age of 40 (stock image)

Although baldness is more common in men, 40 percent of women have visible hair loss at the age of 40.

So is there a way to tell if your wispy summer hair is the start of something more long-term – or a sign of something sinister?

And, more importantly, can you do something about it?

HAIR LOSS DOES NOT CLOSE TO YOUR GENES

At 62, I am lucky that I still have a good hair. People often lay down their own situation on genetics – genes that we inherit from both our parents, not just from our mother, as is often claimed.

So is hair loss just fate written in our DNA? To find out, I had my genes tested by commercial company 23andme.

HOW TO KEEP YOUR CROWNING GLORY

DO

Make sure you eat a Mediterranean diet rich in iron, vitamin D and high-quality proteins such as fish. Your hair (and your heart) will thank you. Vegans and women with heavy menstrual periods should pay particular attention to getting enough B vitamins and iron, either in their diet or by taking supplements.

NOT

Shampoo your hair too often, especially if it is dry or brittle. Conditioner can help prevent breakages that can lead to thinning hair.

  • Eat (yes, some people do), twist or brush your hair too forcefully. If you damage the roots, they can die.
  • Bleaching your hair. It damages the outer part of the hair shaft, making the hair thinner and more likely to break.
  • Overheat your hair. Hot rollers, curls and flat irons can weaken the ashes.
  • Keep your locks tight. Rolls, braids and ponytails can damage the follicles, leading to a condition called traction alopecia.

The kits are available online and cost around £ 150. You get a small test tube and a special cotton swab, which you can use to wipe the inside of your cheek. Then place the cottonbud back in the test tube and place it back on the company. About a week later you get the results that outline the risks of a whole range of disorders and conditions. They told me: & # 39; Michael, the combination of your genetics and other factors means you have a 50 percent chance of experiencing or diluting hair loss before the age of 40. & # 39;

So did I avoid a bullet? Well yes and no. Just because you have a certain gene does not mean that it ever turns on & # 39; & # 39 ;.

Diet, lifestyle and our general health play a major role in gene expression. Theoretically, factors that cause temporary hair loss, such as nutrition, stress, and medication, can switch on baldness genes that lead to a more permanent problem.

MEDICATION HELPS – BUT IT IS NOT PURIFICATION

You can of course accept hair loss. A recent study has shown that bald men are often believed to be more self-confident and attractive by other people. Alternatively you could buy a wig, or if you have a lot of money, you could opt for a hair transplant like footballer Wayne Rooney did. This means transplanting hair, one follicle at a time, from another part of your head, and costs up to £ 7,000.

Then there is the possibility of medication. At present there are only two drugs that have been tested well and have been shown to be both safe and effective, but not on the NHS.

The most commonly used medicine is minoxidil, also known as Regaine, a liquid or foam that you rub on your head.

It was originally developed to treat high blood pressure, but patients soon began reporting unexpected hair growth. The evidence is that about 40 percent of both men and women who get bald will see significant hair regrowth during the first six months of use.

It cannot work miracles, but it is thought to slow the speed of hair loss instead of allowing the hair to grow back. Once a follicle has died, it cannot be raised.

But there are few side effects, and it is available without a prescription, so many doctors I've spoken to say it's worth it. The disadvantages are that it is expensive, around £ 30 for a one-month delivery, and the foam must be used indefinitely.

The other medicine that has been shown to be effective is finasteride. It is only available on prescription and is used to treat prostate problems, but can also stop hair loss.

Like minoxidil, finasteride slows hair loss in around 40 percent of men. However, it also causes side effects – some men have reported depression and erectile dysfunction. In women, it causes hair to fall out due to the specific hormonal effect.

There are new drugs in the pipeline, including stem cell treatments that can & # 39; wake up & # 39; to make. But this is a long way off. In the meantime, follow my checklist in the panel on the left.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) health (t) google