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DORSET osprey chick seen in the Gambia offers hope that birds can recolonize the southern United Kingdom

DORSET osprey chick seen in the Gambia after migrating 4,000 miles offers hope that endangered birds can recolonize southern England after an absence of 200 years

  • A charity has introduced 33 chicks from Scotland to Poole Harbor since 2017
  • The sighting is encouraging as many birds do not survive the flight to West Africa
  • They are expected to eventually migrate back to Dorset to form a population.
  • Ospreys became extinct in much of Western Europe in the early 19th century. Century

A baby eagle chick has been seen in the Gambia after it migrated 4,000 miles from Dorset, England, where it was introduced as part of a conservation program.

The sighting offers hope that the bird of prey in danger can recolonize the south of England after an absence of about 200 years.

It is expected that the osprey, which became extinct in large areas of Western Europe in the early nineteenth century, will restore a population in the port of Poole.

To this end, experts have been gradually reintroducing osprey chicks in the port for the past three years and monitoring their progress.

The chick seen in West Africa is expected to return to Poole Harbor next spring to assume a mate and reproduce, thus helping to establish a sustainable population.

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A osprey chick has been seen in the Gambia after it migrated 4,000 miles from Dorset, England, where it was introduced as part of a conservation program

A osprey chick has been seen in the Gambia after it migrated 4,000 miles from Dorset, England, where it was introduced as part of a conservation program

The members of Birds of Poole Harbor, the charity that oversees the conservation project, could not contain their delight when a British birdwatcher had sent them photos of the so-called ‘chick 019’ that had seen its label.

The sighting is encouraging since most ospreys do not survive their first migration, many are trapped in adverse weather systems or drown.

The chick is expected to return to Poole Harbor in the spring of 2021 and meet a female partner so they can breed there.

The conservation program began in 2017 with eight chicks that were taken from nests in northern Scotland, where there are now sustainable populations of ospreys.

Since then, another 25 birds have been transported 500 miles (805 kilometers) south to the port of Poole.

“The osprey is a very impressive and large bird of prey, and used to be very common throughout Western Europe until they were exterminated 200 years ago due to persecution and disease,” said Paul Morton of Birds of Poole Harbor. .

“A population was restored in Scotland in the 1950s and now breeding programs have seen couples introduced in other places in England and Wales, but so far not in southern England.”

“We started the program to reintroduce them in the south of England in 2017 and with our fingers crossed we will have ospreys once again playing here.”

The sighting offers hope that the bird of prey in danger can recolonize the south of England after an absence of about 200 years.

The sighting offers hope that the bird of prey in danger can recolonize the south of England after an absence of about 200 years.

The sighting offers hope that the bird of prey in danger can recolonize the south of England after an absence of about 200 years.

It is expected that the osprey, which became extinct in large areas of Western Europe in the early nineteenth century, will restore a population in the port of Poole. In the image, a previous attempt to encourage ospreys to nest in the area made use of a nest with two plastic birds

It is expected that the osprey, which became extinct in large areas of Western Europe in the early nineteenth century, will restore a population in the port of Poole. In the image, a previous attempt to encourage ospreys to nest in the area made use of a nest with two plastic birds

It is expected that the osprey, which became extinct in large areas of Western Europe in the early nineteenth century, will restore a population in the port of Poole. In the image, a previous attempt to encourage ospreys to nest in the area made use of a nest with two plastic birds

It is expected that the osprey, which became extinct in large areas of Western Europe in the early nineteenth century, will restore a population in the port of Poole. In the image, a previous attempt to encourage ospreys to nest in the area made use of a nest with two plastic birds

It is expected that the osprey, which became extinct in large areas of Western Europe in the early nineteenth century, will restore a population in the port of Poole. In the image, a previous attempt to encourage ospreys to nest in the area made use of a nest with two plastic birds

Experts have been gradually reintroducing osprey chicks in the harbor for the past three years and monitoring their progress.

Experts have been gradually reintroducing osprey chicks in the harbor for the past three years and monitoring their progress.

Experts have been gradually reintroducing osprey chicks in the harbor for the past three years and monitoring their progress.

“The first migration is very dangerous due to the threat of being shot, drowning when fishing and getting caught in a bad weather system,” explained Mr. Morton.

“Then, when we learned that this girl had arrived in Gambia, we were delighted.”

“He must not return until the spring of 2021, but it is encouraging news.”

However, there is no guarantee that chick 19, or any of its peers that arrived similarly to West Africa, will return to Poole Harbor, since the appeal of its native Scotland may be too great.

The chick seen in West Africa is expected to return to Poole Harbor, pictured, next spring to assume a mate and a race, thus helping to establish a sustainable population

The chick seen in West Africa is expected to return to Poole Harbor, pictured, next spring to assume a mate and a race, thus helping to establish a sustainable population

The chick seen in West Africa is expected to return to Poole Harbor, pictured, next spring to assume a mate and a race, thus helping to establish a sustainable population

A osprey chick has been seen in the Gambia after it migrated 4,000 miles from Dorset, England, where it was introduced as part of a conservation program

A osprey chick has been seen in the Gambia after it migrated 4,000 miles from Dorset, England, where it was introduced as part of a conservation program

A osprey chick has been seen in the Gambia after it migrated 4,000 miles from Dorset, England, where it was introduced as part of a conservation program

The chick is expected to return to Poole Harbor, pictured, in the spring of 2021 and meet a female partner so they can breed there.

The chick is expected to return to Poole Harbor, pictured, in the spring of 2021 and meet a female partner so they can breed there.

The chick is expected to return to Poole Harbor, pictured, in the spring of 2021 and meet a female partner so they can breed there.

The chick is expected to return to Poole Harbor, pictured, in the spring of 2021 and meet a female partner so they can breed there.

The chick is expected to return to Poole Harbor, pictured, in the spring of 2021 and meet a female partner so they can breed there.

The chick is expected to return to Poole Harbor, pictured, in the spring of 2021 and meet a female partner so they can breed there.

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