Dorset model maker spent 26 YEARS building a beautiful miniature Georgian doll house

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A model maker who spent 26 years building a beautiful miniature Georgian dollhouse has put it up for sale for £8,750.

Len Martin, of Charlton Marshall, Dorset, spared no expense in creating the incredibly ornate model mansion with Swarovski chandeliers, gold furnishings and artwork by Egyptian King Farouk’s artist.

The 42-inch dollhouse also contains 16 statues, 138 balustrades, marble floors, stone cherubs on the ceilings, and more small oil paintings created by real artists.

Len Martin, from Charlton Marshall, Dorset, spared no expense in creating the incredibly ornate Georgian-style dollhouse

Len Martin, from Charlton Marshall, Dorset, spared no expense in creating the incredibly ornate Georgian-style dollhouse

The 77-year-old's creation also includes Swarovski chandeliers (pictured), gold furnishings and artwork by Egyptian King Farouk's artist

The 77-year-old’s creation also includes Swarovski chandeliers (pictured), gold furnishings and artwork by Egyptian King Farouk’s artist

Mr Martin, 77, who created the miniature house in memory of his late mother Pearl Langdon, has now decided to put the model up for sale for £8,750

Mr Martin, 77, who created the miniature house in memory of his late mother Pearl Langdon, has now decided to put the model up for sale for £8,750

The 42-inch-tall dollhouse also includes 16 statues, 138 balustrades, marble floors and stone cherubs on the ceilings (pictured)

The 42-inch-tall dollhouse also includes 16 statues, 138 balustrades, marble floors and stone cherubs on the ceilings (pictured)

Martin, 77, created the miniature mansion in memory of his late mother Pearl Langdon.

Georgian architecture was her favorite style and Mr Martin named it Langdon Hall in her honour.

Now he has decided to part with his beloved model and put it up for sale.

He said, “I built it in memory of my late mother and named it Langdon Hall. She was very artistic and I am following in her footsteps.

‘I love making doll houses – I started making them in the early 70’s and I still make them to this day.

Mr Martin (pictured next to his creation), who started making doll houses in the early 1970s, said he designed everything himself

Mr Martin (pictured next to his creation), who started making doll houses in the early 1970s, said he designed everything himself

The 77-year-old model maker said that to create the patterned ceilings, he made a single mold and replicated it multiple times

The 77-year-old model maker said that to create the patterned ceilings, he made a single mold and replicated it multiple times

Mr Martin said the only part he struggled with was the electricity but added that he managed to hide all the wiring in the cavity walls meaning the chandelier and all the fireplaces (pictured) light up

Mr Martin said the only part he struggled with was the electricity but added that he managed to hide all the wiring in the cavity walls meaning the chandelier and all the fireplaces (pictured) light up

“When I was running my shop I started making things when it was quiet and I designed this on a piece of paper and decided to start it the next day.

‘I designed everything myself, but based on Georgian architecture and it grew and grew.

“I found patterns that I liked that I wanted to make a molded ceiling, make a mold and just replicate it multiple times. I found a cherub on a jar, cut it out and molded it.

“Then I bought some gold leaf and taught myself how to do that with gold leaf on the ceiling and balustrades. It took me about three weeks to finish the stairs.

‘When I made the chandelier I went out and bought some Swarovski crystals but didn’t realize how expensive they are, it cost me £100 to make one chandelier.

Mr Martin, who was previously a militaria dealer, said the project involved

Mr Martin, who was previously a militaria dealer, said the project involved “a lot of trial and error” and that he had to “experiment with different things to see if they would work.”

The 42-inch high dollhouse also contains 16 statues, 138 railings, marble floors, stone cherubs on the ceilings, and more small oil paintings created by real artists (pictured)

The 42-inch high dollhouse also contains 16 statues, 138 railings, marble floors, stone cherubs on the ceilings, and more small oil paintings created by real artists (pictured)

The 42-inch dollhouse also features 16 statues, 138 balustrades, marble floors, stone cherubs on the ceilings, and more small oil paintings created by real artists (left and right)

Mr Martin, who now sells the dollhouse, said: 'If you take pictures and blow them up, you'd think you're in a real room'

Mr Martin, who now sells the dollhouse, said: ‘If you take pictures and blow them up, you’d think you’re in a real room’

Mr. Martin bought some gold leaf and taught himself how to apply it to ceilings and balustrades.  He said it took him about three weeks to finish the stairs

Mr. Martin bought some gold leaf and taught himself how to apply it to ceilings and balustrades. He said it took him about three weeks to finish the stairs

‘I cut some marble to make the floor in the entrance and to make the wooden floors I laid each strip of wood one by one and French polished.

“I wanted to put real rocks on them, but it would have cost a fortune, so I cut them all out of cardboard and painted them by hand with a special paint to look like rocks.

“It was a lot of trial and error, experimenting with different things to see if they would work. The only thing I really struggled with is the electrics, I’m not an electrician but I taught myself what to do and everything is hidden in the cavity walls and the chandelier and fireplaces all light up.

“If you take pictures and blow them up, you’d think you’re in a real room.”

Before retiring as a militaria dealer, Mr. Martin had his own shop – half of which was devoted to dolls’ houses.

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