“Don’t wake up from Jared’s anymore!” Trump regrets the criminal law bill

President Trump regrets that he listened to his son-in-law Jared Kushner’s advice on the implementation of criminal justice reform, backtracking on his most twofold feat, which he used to attract black voters and fight racist claims.

Axios reported Trump’s turnaround Wednesday, hours after Trump further sided with the police in the debate between the police and Black Lives Matter, referring to a planned ‘Black Lives Matter’ street mural in New York City as a ‘symbol of hatred’.

The president’s current thinking, one of the sources told Axios, is “no more of Jared’s awakened s ***.”

President Trump regrets listening to son-in-law Jared Kushner in support of criminal justice reform, which he used to share his reputation for helping black America.  Axios reported on Wednesday that Trump thinks the move has hurt him politically

President Trump regrets listening to son-in-law Jared Kushner in support of criminal justice reform, which he used to share his reputation for helping black America. Axios reported on Wednesday that Trump thinks the move has hurt him politically

Jared Kushner, imprisoned to leave his DC home to work in the White House on Tuesday, insisted on the approval of the First Step Act and felt the president should promote it heavily while campaigning for reelection

Jared Kushner, imprisoned to leave his DC home to work in the White House on Tuesday, insisted on the approval of the First Step Act and felt the president should promote it heavily while campaigning for reelection

Jared Kushner, imprisoned to leave his DC home to work in the White House on Tuesday, insisted on the approval of the First Step Act and felt the president should promote it heavily while campaigning for reelection

In December 2018, Trump signed the First Step Act, prompting President Mitch McConnell, a Republican Senate leader, to cross the bill.

The legislation had the best Republican Sens. Chuck Grassley and Mike Lee and prominent Democratic Sens. Cory Booker and Dick Durbin brought together.

Rep. Doug Collins, an avid Trump supporter during impeachment, along with Rep. John Lewis, a Georgia Democrat and civil rights activist, and Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, a New York Democrat and rising congresswoman, to get it done.

Kushner, whose father was in prison, was pushing hard on the bill.

And it got the support of celebrities and media personalities, including Kim Kardashian and CNN’s Van Jones.

But according to Axios, Trump feels that the Kumbaya moment has politically hurt him.

Politico reported a similar story back in September 2019.

“Obviously he thinks it’s a total dud,” said a source who attended a meeting with Trump, Kushner and campaign ads, as the president’s son-in-law suggested the president heavily promotes the First Step Act as part of his re selection strategy.

“He made it abundantly clear that he is not worth talking about,” the source said of Trump.

Trump recently brought up the First Step Act, but has used it to prove that his government has been good for black Americans, especially after George Floyd’s death and subsequent Black Lives Matter demonstrations.

On June 10, the same day he announced that he was not in favor of renaming military bases named after Southern figures, Trump organized a round table of black supporters.

There, after one of those in attendance pointed to his record, he called criminal justice reform a “ big deal ” and reprimanded the authorities for failing to do it – and wagged his hands on Democrats trying to claim credit.

“I keep hearing about ‘Oh, criminal justice reform’ and everyone is trying to take credit,” Trump said. “And this one, I will say, we will take full credit because they couldn’t have done it without us.”

“So we have done a lot for the black community and we have done a lot for all communities,” he added at the June 10 meeting.

Trump calls criminal justice reform, historically further funds black universities and colleges, and lowers the black unemployment rate when called a racist.

But since George Floyd’s death and his downturn in the presidential polls, Trump’s broader strategy has leaned hard in the culture war.

On Tuesday evening, he threatened to veto the National Defense Authorization Act for an amendment introduced by Senator Elizabeth Warren that would name the country’s excellent military bases, which are still named after Southern Hunters.

President Trump believes that he must be unequivocally on the law enforcement side to win reelection later this year.  On Wednesday, he said a 'Black Lives Matter' mural would be a 'symbol of hatred' and would 'further thwart New York's Finest'

President Trump believes that he must be unequivocally on the law enforcement side to win reelection later this year.  On Wednesday, he said a 'Black Lives Matter' mural would be a 'symbol of hatred' and would 'further thwart New York's Finest'

President Trump believes that he must be unequivocally on the law enforcement side to win reelection later this year. On Wednesday, he said a ‘Black Lives Matter’ mural would be a ‘symbol of hatred’ and would ‘further thwart New York’s Finest’

On Wednesday, Trump slammed Mayor of New York City, Bill de Blasio and Black Lives Matter activists, who he accused of chanting ‘Pigs In A Blanket, Fry’ Em Like Bacon ‘to the police for the planned artwork Black Lives Matter on Fifth Avenue.

He said the mural would “offend this luxurious avenue.”

He also suggested that the police interfere with those plans.

“Perhaps our AMAZING police, who have been neutralized and scorned by a mayor who hates and disrespects them, will not have this symbol of hate affixed to New York’s largest street,” Trump wrote. “Spend this money on fighting crime instead!”

The mural is painted outside the Trump Tower.

The mayor popped back and wrote, “The fact that you see it as an insult to your street is the definition of racism.”

Axios reported that Trump believes it is politically best for him to unambiguously support law enforcement.

Commenting on the publication’s report, White House press chief Kayleigh McEnany said the president is “very proud” of the work he has done to benefit “all communities.”

The First Step Act has made historic progress in correcting racial inequalities in sentencing, while its executive order to secure the streets of America is working with our nation’s heroic police officers to ensure that we have safe police and safe communities have, “she said.

The latest reference was to an execution order that Trump signed in the aftermath of Floyd’s death to reform the police, which activists say are not reaching their goals.

Trump’s thinking about the First Step Act probably also means that police bills on Capitol Hill will not receive White House support.

Another source told Axios that leaks from unnamed sources about a rift between Trump and Kushner are deliberately hurtful.

“Numerous anonymous sources have attempted to separate Jared from the President,” said a White House senior official. “They have failed in the past three and a half years. They will also be unsuccessful today. ‘

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