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The donations for the Iowa man, Carson King (photo), 24, which went viral after a journalist found racist tweets on his Twitter from 2011, have risen to more than $ 1.7 million after his tears in which he includes the newspaper who defended his Past

The Venmo donations for an Iowa man who went viral have risen to more than $ 1.7 million after his tearing apology after a journalist found racist tweets on his Twitter from 2011.

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Last weekend, Carson King, 24, a hero was praised after asking for beer money in the background of an ESPN College GameDay broadcast, to later donate the proceeds he received to sick children of the University of Iowa Stead Family Children & # 39; s Hospital.

Mobile payment app Venmo and beer brand Anshauer-Busch have vowed to match the donated money.

But the happy story changed on Tuesday when the Des Moines Register discovered that as a teenager, King had written two racist tweets.

In a statement on television, King – who was 16 when he wrote the messages – mentioned his & # 39; sore and embarrassing & # 39 ;.

The donations for the Iowa man, Carson King (photo), 24, which went viral after a journalist found racist tweets on his Twitter from 2011, have risen to more than $ 1.7 million after his tears in which he includes the newspaper who defended his Past

The donations for the Iowa man, Carson King (photo), 24, which went viral after a journalist found racist tweets on his Twitter from 2011, have risen to more than $ 1.7 million after his tears in which he includes the newspaper who defended his Past

Last weekend, Carson King, 24, a hero was praised after asking for beer money in the background of an ESPN College GameDay broadcast, to later donate the proceeds he received to sick children of the University of Iowa Stead Family Children & # 39; s Hospital
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Last weekend, Carson King, 24, a hero was praised after asking for beer money in the background of an ESPN College GameDay broadcast, to later donate the proceeds he received to sick children of the University of Iowa Stead Family Children & # 39; s Hospital

Last weekend, Carson King, 24, a hero was praised after asking for beer money in the background of an ESPN College GameDay broadcast, to later donate the proceeds he received to sick children of the University of Iowa Stead Family Children & # 39; s Hospital

& # 39; Eight years ago, when I was a sophomore in high school, I posted a number of social media posts with my friends who watched the (Comedy Central) show & # 39; Tosh.0 & # 39; quoted and referred to it, King explained.

& # 39; One of those messages was brought to my attention today by a media member. & # 39;

King also apologized in a tweet and even defended the Des Moines Register for publishing the article about his tweets.

& # 39; The Des Moines register has been nothing but friendly in all their reporting, and I appreciate the reporter who pointed me to the post. I want everyone to understand that this was my decision to address the messages publicly and to apologize. I believe that's the right thing to do, & wrote King.

However, various Twitter users closed the newspaper for digging up the tweets.

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& # 39; You were accidentally thrown in the spotlight, you did something great that made for a good story … No, I have to break it down. How many of us could stand the check? I don't gamble much, & one person wrote.

Another tweet: & # 39; Very gracious response. That said, there is something wrong with a reporter reviewing a semi-public figure tweets from 8 years ago to play gotcha. That's not cool. & # 39;

Since his apology, his donations have skyrocketed to more than $ 1.7 million.

The register did not publish the two tweets in question, but they allegedly compared black mothers with gorillas & made light of black people killed in the Holocaust.

In a statement on television, King - who was 16 when he wrote the messages - mentioned his & # 39; sore and embarrassing & # 39 ;.

In a statement on television, King - who was 16 when he wrote the messages - mentioned his comments & # 39; painful and embarrassing & # 39 ;.

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In a statement on television, King – who was 16 when he wrote the messages – mentioned his comments & # 39; painful and embarrassing & # 39 ;.

King also apologized in a tweet and even defended the Des Moines Register for publishing the article about his tweets

King also apologized in a tweet and even defended the Des Moines Register for publishing the article about his tweets

King also apologized in a tweet and even defended the Des Moines Register for publishing the article about his tweets

However, various Twitter users closed the newspaper for digging up the tweets

However, various Twitter users closed the newspaper for digging up the tweets

However, various Twitter users closed the newspaper for digging up the tweets

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However, the Iowa publication was immediately confronted with intense kickbacks after uncovering King & # 39; s tweets – with many people swearing at & # 39; canceling culture & # 39; and claimed that the newspaper was trying to undermine the good work he had done.

Shortly after the story was published, an angry local wrote on Twitter: & # 39; The PC culture did it again. Changed a young man who raised more than a million dollars for the UI Children & # 39; s Hospital to dig up his past. I find the way the Des Moines register deals with this disgraceful. You should be ashamed of yourself! & # 39;

Another social media user wrote: & # 39; Carson King raises more than 1.1 million for children and a Des Moines Register employee (I refuse to call him a reporter) digs through high-school Twitter account school looking for a problem. He must think he has been appointed to the Supreme Court. & # 39;

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Prolific New York Magazine contributor Yashar Ali even came up with criticism and told his 460,000 Twitter followers that the Des Moines Register report on King's racist tweets is not & # 39; newsworthy & # 39; seemed to be.

& # 39; If Carson King had rebelled about the two tweets from the age of 16 or doubled, I would understand why the register would mention them, but according to the newspaper he was deeply remorseful. I don't understand how newsworthy it was, especially given the good work he did & # 39 ;.

The register went on defense and released a statement from their editor claiming that they were undecided about publishing the information and not their decision to lightly & # 39; to do.

Shortly after the story was published, an angry local wrote on Twitter: & # 39; The PC culture did it again. Has a young man who raises more than a million dollars for the UI Children & # 39; s Hospital, digging up his past ... You should be ashamed of yourself! & # 39;

Shortly after the story was published, an angry local wrote on Twitter: & # 39; The PC culture did it again. Has a young man who raises more than a million dollars for the UI Children & # 39; s Hospital, digging up his past ... You should be ashamed of yourself! & # 39;

Shortly after the story was published, an angry local wrote on Twitter: & # 39; The PC culture did it again. A young man who raised more than a million dollars for the UI Children & # 39; s Hospital, digging up his past … You should be ashamed of yourself! & # 39;

Prolific New York Magazine contributor Yashar Ali even responded to the criticism - told his 460,000 Twitter followers that the Des Moines Register report on King's racist tweets is not newsworthy & # 39; newsworthy & # 39; seemed to be

Prolific New York Magazine contributor Yashar Ali even responded to the criticism - told his 460,000 Twitter followers that the Des Moines Register report on King's racist tweets is not newsworthy & # 39; newsworthy & # 39; seemed to be

Prolific New York Magazine contributor Yashar Ali even responded to the criticism – told his 460,000 Twitter followers that the Des Moines Register report on King's racist tweets is not newsworthy & # 39; newsworthy & # 39; seemed to be

The Des Moines register defended and released a statement from their editor claiming that they were undecided about publishing the information and not & # 39; light & # 39; have decided to do this.

The Des Moines register defended and released a statement from their editor claiming that they were undecided about publishing the information and not & # 39; light & # 39; have decided to do this.

The Des Moines register defended and released a statement from their editor claiming that they were undecided about publishing the information and not & # 39; light & # 39; have decided to do this.

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But only a few hours later, the paper got a red face when it was revealed that the reporter who had discovered King's offensive tweets had reportedly also written some of his own suspicious messages on social media.

Several Twitter users shared screenshots that seemed to show the reporter of Des Moines Register, Aaron Calvin, and who made homophobic and racist comments.

& # 39; This is the reporter who Carson King & # 39; has unmasked & # 39 ;. Pot calls the kettle black, don't you think? Perhaps the Des Moines registry should also perform a standard background check on the social media of their employees, & someone wrote.

Calvin quickly changed his account to private.

Yashar Ali agreed again and wrote: & # 39; If you are going to pick up someone's old tweets, write about it and you have old racist tweets, at least have the courage to warm up Aaron Calvin. Keeping your account private is cowardly. & # 39;

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Others call Calvin a & # 39; hypocritical & # 39 ;.

The Des Moines registry had to address the uncomfortable incident and said they are now investigating.

Hours later, The Des Moines Register got a red face when it was revealed that the reporter who had discovered the offensive tweets from King allegedly also said what damn social media messages had written

Hours later, The Des Moines Register got a red face when it was revealed that the reporter who had discovered the offensive tweets from King allegedly also said what damn social media messages had written

Hours later, The Des Moines Register got a red face when it was revealed that the reporter who had discovered the offensive tweets from King allegedly also said what damn social media messages had written

The Des Moines registry had to address the uncomfortable incident and said they are now investigating
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The Des Moines registry had to address the uncomfortable incident and said they are now investigating

The Des Moines registry had to address the uncomfortable incident and said they are now investigating

Meanwhile, King had become a bit of a local celebrity since he was seen on TV two weeks ago with a sign saying: & # 39; Busch Light Supply Needs Replenished. Venmo Carson-King-25 & # 39 ;.

He waved the board in the background of a broadcast from EPSN College GameDay, before the collision between the state of Iowa and Iowa, and was soon flooded with money.

But after he reached $ 600 and bought himself a box of beer, he decided to change his fundraising to support a children's hospital. The donations arrived quickly.

Within a few hours he claimed to have received more than 2,000 notifications and his phone & # 39; kept on buzzing & # 39; with people from all over America before he quickly reached $ 1 million.

Carson stated: & I had people everywhere (donations) from Texas, Idaho, California, Massachusetts. Many Clemson people have donated. I think they also love Busch Light. & # 39;

Busch Beer participated in the promotion and also promised to donate money to the children's hospital, but they say they will no longer interact with King after his 2011 tweets.

In a statement, the Anheuser-Busch company said: & # 39; Carson King had multiple posts on social media that do not match our values ​​as a brand or as a company and we will have no further association with him.

We deliver on our promise by donating more than $ 350,000 to the hospitals and clinics of the University of Iowa. & # 39;

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