Ultimate magazine theme for WordPress.

Donald Trump’s deposition items are sent to senators TODAY

The Democrats will finally send the articles of Donald Trump’s accusation to the Senate today – a moment shrouded in ceremony and history, but that an explosive and divisive process that balances his presidency will begin.

Nancy Pelosi expects to have votes on the articles and to endorse the charge of “managers” – the members of the House who will prosecute the case against Trump – around 5 p.m.

The vote, expected on a party line, marks the ‘deepening’ of the articles, which means that their status as a legal document becomes definitive.

That is the start of a ceremony that was only performed twice before for a president – and only once in a living memory, when Bill Clinton was deposed in 1998.

The clerk of the house, Cheryl Johnson, and the sergeant, Arms Irving, will lead the managers in procession through the dome of the Capitol to the doors of the senate. There they will be handed over to the Senate Secretary, Julie Adams.

Amazingly enough, the moment of history will hardly be recorded: the senate leaves only one video camera present, unlike in 1998, when it was recorded by a photographer for posterity.

Formality and ceremony will – at least in theory – put an end to the House’s involvement in the accusation.

Instead, it will launch the lawsuit of Donald Trump, a political high-wire act for all involved that has the potential to rain destruction on anyone who is even tangentially involved.

As it was: in 1998, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Henry Hyde handed over the articles of Bill Clinton's accusation to Gary Sisco, the Senate secretary, watching the other members of the committee.

As it was: in 1998, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Henry Hyde handed over the articles of Bill Clinton’s accusation to Gary Sisco, the Senate secretary, watching the other members of the committee.

Moment of history: it took more than two weeks for the articles of Bill Clinton's accusation to be read to the Senate for the Christmas holidays. The reading of Donald Trump's articles is expected next week

Moment of history: it took more than two weeks for the articles of Bill Clinton's accusation to be read to the Senate for the Christmas holidays. The reading of Donald Trump's articles is expected next week

Moment of history: it took more than two weeks for the articles of Bill Clinton’s accusation to be read to the Senate for the Christmas holidays. The reading of Donald Trump’s articles is expected next week

Power movement: Nancy Pelosi will oversee her most important moment as a speaker and pass through the articles of accusation - which in legal terms is known as seizure

Power movement: Nancy Pelosi will oversee her most important moment as a speaker and pass through the articles of accusation - which in legal terms is known as seizure

Power movement: Nancy Pelosi will oversee her most important moment as a speaker and pass through the articles of accusation – which in legal terms is known as seizure

Accused: Donald Trump only becomes the third president who has a trial against the Senate, after Bill Clinton, who was tried in 1999, and Andrew Johnson in 1868

Accused: Donald Trump only becomes the third president who has a trial against the Senate, after Bill Clinton, who was tried in 1999, and Andrew Johnson in 1868

Accused: Donald Trump only becomes the third president who has a trial against the Senate, after Bill Clinton, who was tried in 1999, and Andrew Johnson in 1868

The drama starts at about 10 o’clock in the morning when Pelosi appoints the prosecutors who will defend the senators that Trump has abused his office by pressuring Ukraine to investigate the son of political rival Joe Biden and then investigate the search for it. Congress to hinder what happened.

The ‘gaming’ of the ‘managers’ has been a hot location in the Capitol for months and Pelosi has been keeping a close eye on the details. But judging by the Clinton process, exposure is likely to improve the profiles of whoever she chooses. Possible choices include the two presidents who conducted the hearings, Adam Schiff from the intelligence service and Jerrold Nadler from the judiciary.

Around lunch time she speaks on the floor and the House agrees to send the items.

Later Wednesday, the entire follow-up team will be behind House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving and House Clerk Cheryl Johnson, who will store the articles in folders. The procession runs two by two through the National Statuary Hall, past the Pelosi office, across the Rotunda and to the doors of the Johnson Senate and then hands over the articles to the Secretary of Senate Julie E. Adams.

The managers will return to the House of Representatives until the Senate allows them.

The senate then considers some everyday-sounding details, as well as some historical ones, according to the precedent of Clinton’s deposition.

First, they will consider decisions on how to arrange the room to accommodate the prosecution and defense teams, and who can view from the galleries. Then, according to a memo distributed among the senators, comes a series of formalities: the reception of the house managers.

Towards the end of the week, managers are expected to show the articles of deposition. Roberts and the senators will take their oath. And the senators will sign an oath book that has been used since 1986 for presidential and judicial removal sentences stored in the National Archives.

When that finally happens, the Sergeant-at-Arms, James Mathers, will proclaim: “Hear! Hear ye! Hear ye! All persons are ordered to remain silent, on pain of imprisonment, while the United States Senate sits before the trial of the articles of deposition. “

The rules of the senate say that the process then begins and runs six days a week – not on Sundays – until it is resolved. But senators could vote to change the schedule.

The night before the House vote, there was some indication of how explosive the coming weeks might be when the House Intelligence Committee released a new wealth of information from Lev Parnas, the Soviet-born sidekick of Rudy Giuliani who has now been charged with crime.

In more than 30 pages of messages and images retrieved from one of Parnas’ devices, it revealed how Giuliani had written to the newly-elected president of Ukraine, Voldomyr Zelensky, that he had requested a meeting with the “permission and knowledge” of the president.

It also showed that Parnas wrote down the apparent details of a “deal” to secure an investigation into “Biden”; Parnas who urged Giuliani to get a visa for a allegedly corrupt Ukrainian public prosecutor and the lawyer who said he had “No” 1 on it; and Parnas and a fanatical pro-Trump Republican congress candidate who exchanged messages calling Marie Yovanovitch, then the US ambassador to Ukraine a “b *** h” and suggested that her movements were followed.

In a message, the potential congressman, Robert Hyde, told Parnas that he was watching men and said, “They are willing to help if we / you want a prize.”

Hyde, who has posed repeatedly to the president and has given more than $ 50,000 to pro-Trump campaign groups and at the same time has child support, said on twitter: “How low can Adam Bull Schiff go? I have never been to Kiev. For them to take some texts from my buddies and I wrote back to what we played with that we met a few times while we drank a few drinks is certainly laughable. Schiff is a desperate turd playing with this Lev guy. “

The Parnas files can be the tip of an iceberg; the House Intelligence Committee has three of its devices.

The effect of a drip-drip of releasing their content will be felt most by the Senate Republicans.

Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that he expects the senate to officially start the trial next week.

The senate will be Martin Luther King Jr. Day observing Monday and starting the deposition process on Tuesday, McConnell announced. Republican Kentucky added that the Senate will take some preparatory steps this week – most likely, swearing in John Roberts, Supreme Court Supreme Court, to chair the trial, swearing in senators as jury members.

That takes at least an entire morning or afternoon, where everyone has to write their name in an “oath book” promising that they will fulfill their constitutional duty.

What happens next is reading the articles and then the first split point: a debate about the rules.

McConnell predicted that the White House’s favorite result, passing on a quick motion to reject the charges against the president, is unlikely.

‘There is little or no feeling for a motion to reject. We have a duty to listen to the arguments, “he told reporters.

His plan would mean an accelerated process in which house managers would present their case for a total of 24 hours during four days. The defense of Trump would then get the same amount of time.

Another bomb: the House Intelligence Committee unveiled a letter of 10 May from Giuliani to the Ukrainian president seeking a meeting with Trump’s “knowledge and consent”

The plot thicker: the House Intelligence Committee released information provided by Giuliani employee Lev Parnas showing his notes of a 'deal'

The plot thicker: the House Intelligence Committee released information provided by Giuliani employee Lev Parnas showing his notes of a 'deal'

The plot thicker: the House Intelligence Committee released information provided by Giuliani employee Lev Parnas showing his notes of a ‘deal’

More pressure: while Republicans were preparing to vote on the rules for the trial, the Lev Parnas files revealed Robert Hyde, a party congress candidate and fanatic pro-Trump fan who appears to have played golf with the president, Parnas reports about it of a serving US ambassador under supervision and calling her a “b *** h”

WhatsApp messages seem to show GOP congress candidate Robert Hyde following the movements of US ambassador Marie Yovanovitch

WhatsApp messages seem to show GOP congress candidate Robert Hyde following the movements of US ambassador Marie Yovanovitch

WhatsApp messages seem to show GOP congress candidate Robert Hyde following the movements of US ambassador Marie Yovanovitch

Under the current plan of the Republicans, senators are allowed to ask written questions to the managers, who read the answers to the word, and when the questions are exhausted, they vote on whether to condemn and remove the president.

But that was bitterly opposed by the Democratic minority, and even before the Parnas revelations, some moderate Republican senators indicated that they would be interested in hearing witnesses, in particular John Bolton, the former national security adviser who said he would testify if he was summoned.

The Parnas files are likely to be used by Democrats to increase the pressure on moderate Republicans.

Democrats need four Republicans to walk over to force witnesses, and see Mitt Romney of Utah, Susan Collins of Maine, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, as their main goals.

But then there is a series of other goals, including Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, who is retiring; Cory Gardner from Colorado, whose state is rapidly turning blue; and Thom Tillis from North Carolina, who is seen as having to go to the center in his re-election attempt in a state that is increasingly seen as purple.

Tomorrow’s vote has been going on for three weeks since the House accused Trump of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, with only Democrats supporting the motions.

Two voted against both articles – one of which subsequently changed sides to become a Republican – and one voted for the first article but against the second.

Since then, Pelosi has been holding on to trying to force a “fair trial,” that is, witnessing, but McConnell crowed this week that she had achieved “nothing.”

She was challenging Tuesday and said both McConnell’s senators and the president are on trial now.

“The American people deserve the truth and the constitution demands a trial. The House will now broadcast the deposition items and appoint deposition managers on Wednesday, January 15. The president and the senators will be held responsible, “Pelosi wrote in a statement on Tuesday.

House speaker Nancy Pelosi announced on Tuesday that the house will vote on Wednesday to send accusations to the senate. She did not mention the Democrats who would serve as accusation managers for the trial

House speaker Nancy Pelosi announced on Tuesday that the house will vote on Wednesday to send accusations to the senate. She did not mention the Democrats who would serve as accusation managers for the trial

House speaker Nancy Pelosi announced on Tuesday that the house will vote on Wednesday to send accusations to the senate. She did not mention the Democrats who would serve as accusation managers for the trial

The announcement followed a caucus meeting Tuesday morning

The announcement followed a caucus meeting Tuesday morning

The announcement followed a caucus meeting Tuesday morning

Jerry Nadler

Jerry Nadler

Some speculate that two of the accusation managers are House Intelligence chairman Adam Schiff and House Judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler (photo)

Majority leader Mitch McConnell has still not said whether the Senate will receive witnesses in the trial, but claims that they will hold a voice after opening arguments about whether they should call on individuals to testify

Majority leader Mitch McConnell has still not said whether the Senate will receive witnesses in the trial, but claims that they will hold a voice after opening arguments about whether they should call on individuals to testify

Majority leader Mitch McConnell has still not said whether the Senate will receive witnesses in the trial, but claims that they will hold a voice after opening arguments about whether they should call on individuals to testify

The speaker of the House was also expected to announce on Tuesday the names of legislators who will act as ‘managers’ and prosecute the president. But no names were released.

Two Democrats thought they were leaders because his jobs were Adam Schiff, chairman of the intelligence commission, who led the investigation of allegations in the House, and chairman of the judiciary, Jerry Nadler, whose committee approved the accusation articles in December.

HOW IMPEACHMENT IS NOW MISSING

Wednesday: Nancy Pelosi votes on the floor of the House to pass on the two articles of deposition to the Senate. She also mentions the ‘managers’ who will prosecute the case for the Democrats

Thursday: The US Senate receives the articles of deposition. Mitch McConnell can immediately start a debate about the rules under which the trial will take place. He will also have to decide on the status of a motion, which he has signed to himself, calling for a quick dismissal of the articles of deposition without trial. It is unknown whether the motion will be voted on or not.

Friday: Senators leave Washington D.C. for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day weekend

Monday: Congress observes MLK Day

Tuesday: Opening arguments could start in the process when Donald Trump is on his way to Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum

Pelosi met her Democratic caucus on Tuesday morning to choose a way forward. The caucus decided that a vote in the house on Wednesday would complete the dispatch of the twin items to McConnell’s room.

“In December, the House maintained its constitutional duty to defend democracy for the people: two articles of accusation against President Donald Trump – abuse of power and obstruction of Congress,” Pelosi continued Tuesday.

“The GOP leader of the senate has signed a dismissal resolution. A dismissal is a cover, “she said.

By waiting until Wednesday, Democratic presidential candidates who have debated Tuesday evening in Iowa, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar, can keep the spotlight and return to Washington in the morning.

The three will be sworn in as jury members this week. An extensive trial could include six days of hearings per week, and remove them from the campaign as long as Republican McConnell wants.

It is not yet clear how long the process will take.

McConnell is preparing a resolution to lay down the rules for the trial, which will be discussed on Tuesday.

Susan Collins

Susan Collins

Mitt Romney

Mitt Romney

Republican senators Susan Collins (left) and Mitt Romney (right) have said they will probably vote to hear from witnesses after opening arguments. They also thwarted the White House plan to request a resolution to reject the case and claim that they would not vote to approve

There are a handful of Republicans who disagree with McConnell and Graham’s approach to a quick trial, claiming they want to hear from witnesses.

‘I have worked for and advocated that we follow that model. And that we have language on the board [rules] setting the parameters of the process that would make it possible to vote whether or not we should receive witnesses, “moderate Republican Senator Susan Collins told reporters Monday night.

Tennessee GOP senator Lamar Alexander says he might vote to hear witnesses

‘Maybe not. Or maybe so, “said the senator, who is retiring at the end of the year.

“My opinion is that we should hear the case, ask our questions, and then vote whether we should hear additional witnesses or ask for additional documents,” Alexander said. “It’s important to vote whether we have witnesses or not.”

But Senator Rand Paul warned his colleagues that they cannot be selective against witnesses if they approve to hear from them.

“Don’t think you can just vote for Bolton and not for the witnesses Trump wants,” Paul said to Politico during a party lunch last week.

He suggested that he insist on the call from Hunter Biden.

“I’m not going to vote for the witnesses before witnesses. But I assume I’ll vote afterwards, “another moderate Republican, Senator Mitt Romney, told reporters.

Romney has publicly argued with Trump in the past.

The White House is also preparing its defense of Trump with White House counsel, Pat Cipollone, and Trump’s personal lawyer, Jay Sekulow, expecting to play a role in the process.

The Trump council also urges the Senate to include in the rules of its removal decision an option that would quickly reject the accusations against the president. The motion would require 51 votes and, if adopted, end the process.

Both Collins and Romney claim that they will not vote to immediately reject the trial – and because Republicans have 53 seats and 51 are needed to approve motions, the resolution will not be adopted.

Trump’s defense strategy for the Senate removal process is ongoing and the White House council, Pat Cipollone, will take the lead and put forward open arguments.

Although the upper chamber of the republican majority has not yet voted when it will call witnesses, Cipollone will also participate in cross-investigations when individuals ultimately testify.

The delegates from Cipollone, Michael Purpura and Patrick Philbin, will also be stationed in the defense of Trump in the Senate and Purpura, along with Trump’s personal lawyer Jay Seklow, are expected to participate in cross-investigations of witnesses.

“If there are witnesses, he will crush some people,” said a former senior Trump adviser about Cipollone.

Sekulow is the longest-serving member of Trump’s personal legal team. He is expected to focus his own test presentation more on the Ukrainian scandal.

While Cipollone, 54, is central to the upcoming hearing about the deposition of the Senate, the personal lawyer of the president, Rudy Giuliani, 75, who is lobbying to join the legal team of deposition, will be sidelined.

Witte Huisraad Pat Cipollone (photo) takes the lead as defense of Donald Trump in the process of depositing the Senate

Witte Huisraad Pat Cipollone (photo) takes the lead as defense of Donald Trump in the process of depositing the Senate

Witte Huisraad Pat Cipollone (photo) takes the lead as defense of Donald Trump in the process of depositing the Senate

Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, despite lobbying for a position in the defense, will be turned off for the hearing on deposition. Giuliani may be a witness in the process if Republicans vote to call people to testify

Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, despite lobbying for a position in the defense, will be turned off for the hearing on deposition. Giuliani may be a witness in the process if Republicans vote to call people to testify

Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, despite lobbying for a position in the defense, will be turned off for the hearing on deposition. Giuliani may be a witness in the process if Republicans vote to call people to testify

Giuliani, the former republican mayor of New York City, has become a central figure in the accusation proceedings regarding his dealings with Ukraine.

A few officials claimed that Giuliani put pressure on the president to make him part of the legal team that will plead on the floor of the Senate against Trump’s removal from office.

Giuliani has been one of the most loyal defenders of Trump, who has appeared on TV dozens of times in the aftermath of the anonymous whistleblower complaint that started investigating allegations.

The lawyer has been noticeably absent lately when speaking on TV as a surrogate for Trump.

Giuliani has argued that he knows the details of the allegations against the president from the inside.

He has also publicly indicated that he has an interest in becoming involved in the case.

“I would like to try the matter,” Giuliani told reporters while attending President Mar-a-Lago’s New Year’s party.

An informal adviser told the Huffington Post in an interview published Monday that Giuliani “worked hard on Trump” to be included among the lawyers who will defend him.

Another source told CNN that Trump is not advised to use Giuliani to join the legal team, mainly because of the lawyer’s involvement in some issues near the start of the investigation of allegations.

“The president will never get him in the Senate trial, starting with the problem that he is a potential witness,” the source said close to Trump.

READ THE ARTICLES OF IMPEACHMENT AT DONALD TRUMP

In 1414 words, the accusation articles that the House of Representatives passed on Wednesday contain two charges against President Donald Trump.

Article I: Abuse of power

Utilizing the powers of his high office, President Trump asked the interference of a foreign government, Ukraine, in the US presidential election in 2020.

Accused: Donald Trump has two accusation articles against him

Accused: Donald Trump has two accusation articles against him

Accused: Donald Trump has two accusation articles against him

He did this through a scheme or line of action calling on the Government of Ukraine to publicly announce that his re-election would be beneficial, would harm the prospects of a political opponent, and the United States presidential election in his impact in 2020.

President Trump has also attempted to press the Government of Ukraine to take these steps by conditioning official acts of the United States Government of considerable value to Ukraine in his public announcement of the investigations.

President Trump was involved in this arrangement or line of conduct for corrupt purposes to pursue personal political gain. In doing so, President Trump used the powers of the presidency in a way that endangered the national security of the United States and undermined the integrity of the democratic process of the United States. “

Article II: Obstruction of the congress

As part of this accusation investigation, the committees that conducted the investigation filed summonses for documents and testimonies that were deemed essential for the investigation of various executive branches and offices, and current and former officials.

In response, for no legitimate reason or excuse, President Trump has instructed agencies, offices, and executive officials not to comply with these summonses. President Trump thus inserted the powers of the presidency against the legal summons of the House of Representatives and assumed himself the functions and judgments necessary for the exercise of the “sole power of accusation” that the Constitution possesses in the House of Representatives .

In the history of the Republic, no president has ever ordered the full opposition of an accusation investigation or attempted to completely obstruct and obstruct the House of Representatives’ ability to investigate “high crimes and crimes.”

This abuse of office served to disguise the repeated misconduct of the President and to seize and control the power of deposition – and thus to invalidate a vital constitutional guarantee that rested solely on the House of Representatives.

.