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Donald Trump’s call for a cut in payroll taxes is being dumped by the White House and Republicans

Donald Trump’s call for a payroll tax cut is dumped by the White House and Republicans in the first round of negotiations for a new corona virus rescue operation – tweet 40 times within an hour and attack Joe Biden

  • Senate Republicans unveil their $ 1 trillion coronavirus package
  • Treasury Sec. Steven Mnuchin said the payroll tax cut ‘is not on the base account’
  • But he said it could end up on the next bill
  • He emphasized provisions to help the unemployed as an additional 1.4 million Americans claimed benefits
  • The proposal has already received repression from Republicans
  • Trump said a few days ago: “I would consider not signing if we don’t get a payroll tax cut”

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Thursday that the signature proposal for President Trump’s payroll tax cut would be dropped from the $ 1 trillion republican coronavirus package negotiated with the White House.

Mnuchin told CNBC that the payroll tax cut is “not in the base bill” – confirming the fate of a proposal that had already been repressed by Republican lawmakers and not included in earlier versions of coronavirus relief.

Instead, negotiators attempt to classify provisions as unemployed workers, who would receive unemployment benefits amounting to 70 percent of lost wages under the last negotiated provision.

His comments came one day when the government announced that another 1.4 million Americans had claimed unemployment.

Treasury Sec. Steven Mnuchin said payroll tax cut 'isn't in the base bill' revealing Republicans to tackle coronavirus

Treasury Sec. Steven Mnuchin said payroll tax cut ‘isn’t in the base bill’ revealing Republicans to tackle coronavirus

“We think the payroll tax cut is a very good pro-growth policy,” said Mr. Mnuchin CNBC. “The president’s focus is now on getting money in people’s pockets,” he said.

Trump continued to promote the proposal in interviews, even though fellow republicans were wary of taking away the portion of the wages that both workers pay through and employers through payroll taxes into the social security system.

“We want to make sure that the people out there who can’t find a job get a reasonable wage replacement,” Mnuchin added.

“I’ll have to see it, but yeah, I’d consider not signing if we don’t get payroll taxes,” Trump told Fox interviewer Chris Wallace on Sunday

Senate leader Mitch McConnell, and Republicans will soon announce their coronavirus laws

Senate leader Mitch McConnell, and Republicans will soon announce their coronavirus laws

Senate leader Mitch McConnell, and Republicans will soon announce their coronavirus laws

But he kept the proposal alive for a future relief he believed was possible.

“But we’ll be back. There could be a CARES 5.0, “Mnuchin said.

In fact, President Trump said he might not sign the bill without it. But after just a few days of talking one day, the Senate Republicans reveal their legislation: “It’s not on the base bill,” Mnuchin said.

“I’ll have to see it, but then again, I’d consider not signing if we don’t get a payroll tax cut,” Trump told Fox interviewer Chris Wallace on Sunday, leaving enough room for maneuver over the threat for a few days.

He also called the proposal “very important”.

The withdrawal comes when Trump has turned in other areas, brought back his coronavirus briefings after a month’s hiatus, urges people to wear masks while wearing one themselves, and acknowledges things are getting ‘worse’ before they get better at the fight against the coronavirus.

He follows Democrat Joe Biden in national polls and has repeatedly hammered his rival into public comments.

Trump has returned a string of messages criticizing Biden on Thursday, including one of former speaker Newt Gingrich who claimed that Biden would “attack” religious morality.

Democrats opposed the idea of ​​a wage tax cut. Senate Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, a Republican from Iowa, warned that it could be “a public relations problem,” criticizing the party for drawing funding from Social Security and Medicare Trust months before an election.

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