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Domestic violence has reached a breaking point with women who cannot get funding to escape abuse

A young mother has revealed the terrifying moment when her abused former partner threatened to “burn her in an oven” and “serve her for dinner.”

Lauren, not her real name, came forward with her gripping story of abuse and intimidation after the horrific murder in Hannah Clarke last week last week by her ex-husband Rowan Baxter.

Daily Mail Australia can also reveal how women threatened by the death of their violent former partners are being sent away from welfare institutions due to a lack of funding.

Frightened women who live in north-west Melbourne cannot access flexible, flexible domestic violence assistance packages.

Announced in 2016, the packages should offer up to $ 10,000 to victims of family violence by helping them “access to support, emerge from the crisis, stabilize and improve their safety, well-being and independence for recovery.”

Hannah Clarke (left) and her three children were burned alive by her deranged ex Rowan Baxter (right)

Hannah Clarke (left) and her three children were burned alive by her deranged ex Rowan Baxter (right)

Lauren said she couldn’t get funding for security cameras in her house because the welfare agency had exhausted the allocation of packages.

The young mother said she was forced to move out of fear of her tormentor, who repeatedly threatened to kill her.

She said her fears had been exacerbated by the torch in Brisbane from Hannah Clarke and her children.

Baxter threw Mrs. Clarke and their children, Aaliyah, six, Laianah, four, and Trey, three, into gas and set them on fire during the school run last Wednesday, in a family violence crime that shocked the nation. Baxter committed suicide.

In a threatening voice message left on Laurens phone on Christmas day, the criminal threatened to burn her in an oven and serve her for dinner.

“I think there are huge gaps in funding for victims of domestic violence,” she said.

Lauren has been divorced for 10 years, but the hostility of her ex-partner has reached dangerous new heights in the last four years.

The beaten father demanded that his seriously ill daughter move in with him, even though he refused to follow the proper medical training needed to take care of the girl.

Worse still, the NSW resident has used the law to his advantage, while publicly showing off his madness.

“It was as if a light switch turned and then the verbal abuse, text messages, the threats started again,” Lauren said.

Without orders from the Family Court, Lauren had the constant fear that her ex-partner would simply take their sick daughter away.

‘Legal aid will not fund a case if you initiate it. So if you are the respondent, you can get funding to respond to a Family Court application, but not if you are the applicant, “she said.

“So you have to wait to be a victim, and if the law is in place if you have not signed any definitive court orders, you can go to her school with her birth certificate and remove the child.”

Lauren said that once a child has been removed, the Family Court is reluctant to return the child until the case is completed.

“I knew it was possible that he could do that. I never thought he would do it, he threatened and then he did it, “she said.

Under the criminal’s villains, Lauren was forced to flee her home in the land of Victoria and move to the city where she thought her family would be safe.

“He located us through the courts,” Lauren said.

He appeared at the school of the sick child, where concerned teachers tried to postpone him.

The violent criminal lost the plot and the police were summoned.

A victim of domestic violence was denied access to cash, which meant she could have slept better at night

A victim of domestic violence was denied access to cash, which meant she could have slept better at night

A victim of domestic violence was denied access to cash, which meant she could have slept better at night

Lauren received a text message from a man she thought was her husband under a fake Facebook name

Lauren received a text message from a man she thought was her husband under a fake Facebook name

Lauren received a text message from a man she thought was her husband under a fake Facebook name

“It took the police an hour and a half to get there,” Lauren said.

Despite the ugly incident, the police did not take an intervention order and told the frightened woman if he would show up again to call 000.

“Two weeks later I get a note of police apology because they should have referred me to a welfare organization that would normally check in with you the next day to make sure everything is fine,” she said.

With evidence of increasing threats, Lauren said the police were opposed to requesting an intervention order.

“They said you don’t run enough risk because the offender lives on the highway,” she said.

Legal action was then started in NSW, where Lauren had to be present in person without financing for a lawyer.

“I had to represent myself and had to go there, which is crazy because Victorian legal aid told its federal court that if we were to fund a case in Victoria, NSW would have to finance it, but it didn’t work out,” she said.

Lauren could not get help from welfare agencies when the harassment of her abuser escalated.

With her current husband locked up in alien detention after a visa jungle, Lauren was left alone to tackle the impending threat.

At one point, her ex-husband was found lurking in her house after she was driven to Melbourne in a rental car.

Homeless and scared, Lauren was unable to even access a sanctuary for women because she takes care of an adult son with severe autism.

Instead, welfare institutions gave her a link to a “how not to die” website for women trying to escape from domestic violence.

“He told me he would burn me alive in an oven. He was going to cremate me, “she said.

An intervention order was finally issued by a magistrate last month after months of harassment.

But Lauren has little faith in a system that she thinks is piled up against her.

“More women will burn,” she said.

Brisbane’s mother, Hannah Clarke, wrote that she was a “survivor, not a victim” in one of her latest posts on social media

Founder of the National Homeless Collective Donna Stolzenberg must help high-risk women who have no access to government support

Founder of the National Homeless Collective Donna Stolzenberg must help high-risk women who have no access to government support

Founder of the National Homeless Collective Donna Stolzenberg must help high-risk women who have no access to government support

Founder of the National Homeless Collective Donna Stolzenberg said she was More and more cases of women are being sent away from support services due to lack of funding or red tape making support inaccessible.

“Agencies refuse to pay a deposit and rent in advance for private rental, but there is no public housing stock available for desperate families to rent,” she said.

“These women almost always have financial abuse and control through their violent partners.

They are now turning to us, desperately seeking support because there is no one else to help them. “

Mrs Stolzenberg said that women living in certain zones could not get access to funding from bodies that still had money because they did not live in the right river basin.

“It’s incredibly frustrating because we’re not funded to help people, so we have to call on the public to raise money so that women can get to safety,” she said.

“We take the responsibility of the government, but they do not finance us to do this.”

Mrs Stolzenberg said it saw an increase in desperate women, who have repeatedly violated ex-partners’ intervention orders but have not yet been charged.

“Offenders are released to come back immediately and cause more fear and threats, meaning that women have to move or go into hiding again, or sit down like ducks waiting for their ex to carry out his violent threats,” she said.

Mrs. Stolzenberg lashed out at the police and accused officers of complacency.

“They are too close to the source and because they see the worst end of the domestic abuse spectrum (murder), things are considered threats as nothing more than a nuisance and not taken seriously, even if they are credible,” they said.

‘The police let the perpetrators get away with violating AVOs simply because they see so many cases of violence every day that a threat alone is not considered important enough.

“The power to make that decision must itself be taken by the police and legally required that all people who violate an arrest warrant are immediately detained for a minimum period, long enough to bring the victim to safety and extra to take measures including mandatory counseling for the perpetrators. “

Victoria Police spokeswoman Cathy Le said that family violence was most of the first line of police work.

“We remain committed to reducing the prevalence of this crime in our community and the damage it causes,” she said.

Mrs. Le said that the Victoria Police continued to respond every year to an increasing number of incidents of domestic violence.

“In Victoria, the police responded to more than 84,000 domestic violence incidents in the year that ended in September 2019,” she said.

‘That means that the police respond to more than 230 incidents of family violence per day, or one incident every six minutes.

‘The police are working hard against people who do not comply with reporting obligations or violate orders, and this has consequences for the number of violations that we encounter throughout the state. There were more than 45,000 breaches of domestic violence orders – a record high (11.6 percent increase from 40,633 to 45,334). “

Mrs. Le said that the Victoria Police did everything to ensure that its police officers are better trained and able to respond to domestic violence.

A fundraiser was started to help Lauren and other risky women.

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