Dolphins are now being killed by the outbreak of Florida's red tide algae

The Mote Stranding Research Program has recovered nine dead bottlenose dolphins in Sarasota County, Florida, believed to have been killed by the red tide

Conservationists in Florida do not know how to avoid poisonous algae that kill local marine wildlife.

Reports say that nine dolphins have died since Tuesday because the red tide affects several of the state's coasts.

Experts are planning the worst & # 39; and there's no end in sight & # 39; to stop the last wave of deadly microorganism Karenia brevis.

The Mote Stranding Research Program has recovered nine dead bottlenose dolphins in Sarasota County, Florida, believed to have been killed by the red tide

The Mote Stranding Research Program has recovered nine dead bottlenose dolphins in Sarasota County, Florida, believed to have been killed by the red tide

At least six dolphins have perished in the last 24 hours alone, compared to around 15 that usually die each year.

At least six dolphins have perished in the last 24 hours alone, compared to around 15 that usually die each year.

At least six dolphins have perished in the last 24 hours alone, compared to around 15 that usually die each year.

Rescue teams are recovering dolphins and other marine species continuously as the last red tide wreaks havoc in Southwest Florida

Rescue teams are recovering dolphins and other marine species continuously as the last red tide wreaks havoc in Southwest Florida

Rescue teams are recovering dolphins and other marine species continuously as the last red tide wreaks havoc in Southwest Florida

Red algae have affected Venice, Casey Key and Siesta Key in Sarasota County, where dead marine life is washed continuously off the coast.

A pair of dolphins were recently removed from the Gulf of Mexico, bringing the number of mammal deaths to nine since Tuesday, according to Fox News.

WHAT IS THE RED TIDE?

The red tide is caused by a high concentration of microscopic algae that commonly pollute the waters of the southwest coast of Florida.

It contains a harmful toxin known as Karenia brevis, which is known to devastate marine wildlife and ecosystems.

Humans also run the risk of getting sick if they come in contact with the red tide. Headaches, nausea and respiratory problems are among the diseases it can cause.

Its smell can cause skin irritations and a burning sensation in the nose and lungs.

The name comes from the discoloration of water to a reddish brown resembling rust.

It is unclear what causes the red tide, but climate change may be a factor since toxins thrive in warm waters.

Mote Marine Laboratory researcher Gretchen Lovewell said:

"It feels like ground zero, we're seeing stomachs full of partially digested fresh fish and not much else, which is one of our first indications that this is the red tide.

& # 39; We are planning for the worst. We do not see an end in sight at this time. We're just trying to get ready and turn people around. "

A toxic bloom has been persistent in the southwest Florida region for 10 months and shows no signs of slowing down.

Lovewell estimates that the red tide kills 15 dolphins each year, although the current large-scale infestation has caused six in the last 24 hours.

Other reports indicate that "thousands" of fish, including red mullet, catfish, trout, grouper and grunt, are fouling beaches in Florida.

Crabs, eels, manatees and turtles have also been killed, and are still in danger of being eliminated.

The last catastrophic wave of the red tide in Florida is cited as the worst in more than a decade.

Photos of the Mote Stranding Research Program show more dead dead animals for necropsy

Photos of the Mote Stranding Research Program show more dead dead animals for necropsy

Photos of the Mote Stranding Research Program show more dead dead animals for necropsy

Florida's generally scenic coasts are filled with dead fish, which are piled near the mangroves on Anna Maria Island.

Florida's generally scenic coasts are filled with dead fish, which are piled near the mangroves on Anna Maria Island.

Florida's generally scenic coasts are filled with dead fish, which are piled near the mangroves on Anna Maria Island.

The last wave of toxic red tide has persisted for about 10 months, experts say, and is believed to be the worst in more than a decade

The last wave of toxic red tide has persisted for about 10 months, experts say, and is believed to be the worst in more than a decade

The last wave of toxic red tide has persisted for about 10 months, experts say, and is believed to be the worst in more than a decade

Reports suggest that "thousands" of fish, including red mullet, catfish, trout, grouper and grunt, are fouling the shores of Florida

Reports suggest that "thousands" of fish, including red mullet, catfish, trout, grouper and grunt, are fouling the shores of Florida

Reports suggest that "thousands" of fish, including red mullet, catfish, trout, grouper and grunt, are fouling the shores of Florida

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