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Dolphin repeatedly ram his head against the side of his tank in & # 39; Singapore aquarium & # 39;

& # 39; Depressive & # 39; dolphin repeatedly ram his head against the side of his tank in & # 39; Singapore aquarium & # 39; in images released by animal kingdom

  • A dolphin was filmed repeatedly and rammed its head against the clear side of its aquarium
  • Alleged images were made in the aquarium on Sentosa Island, Singapore
  • Empty The Tanks Animal Charity posted images on social media to address issues
  • Resorts World Sentosa claimed that the animals express themselves like this & # 39; curiosity & # 39; behave

A dolphin was repeatedly filmed as he slammed his head against the wall of his aquarium while being held in an aquarium in Singapore.

Images of the allegedly troubled animal caught in Resorts World Sentosa (RWS) S.E.A. Aquarium on Sentosa Island appeared on social media last week.

The video that was filmed last year by a concerned member of the public was then sent to the American campaign group Animal The Tanks.

In the 30-second clip you can see the dolphin hitting himself against the clear glass panels in front of the audience.

Experts said the animal probably acted from & # 39; boredom, neurosis or depression & # 39 ;.

More than 20 dolphins are kept in the resort's Dolphin Island exhibition, where an aquarium spokesperson could not confirm that the recordings were made on RWS.

Some very worrying images have been brought to our attention by an empty The Tanks Supporter of a dolphin who repeatedly hit their heads against the wall at S.E.A. Aquarium in Singapore. This disturbing behavior is one of the many reasons why dolphins do not belong in captivity. #EmptyTheTanks #seaaquariumsingapore #singapore #seaaquarium #sentosa

Posted by Empty the tanks on Sunday, December 1, 2019

The dolphin was repeatedly filmed and hit the glass panels in an aquarium

A campaign group said it was taken by an audience member at Resorts World Sentosa's (RWS) S.E.A. Aquarium in Sentosa island, Singapore

A campaign group said it was taken by an audience member at Resorts World Sentosa's (RWS) S.E.A. Aquarium in Sentosa island, Singapore

The dolphin was repeatedly filmed and hit the glass panels in an aquarium. A campaign group said it was taken by an audience member at Resorts World Sentosa's (RWS) S.E.A. Aquarium in Sentosa island, Singapore

Dr. Naomi Rose, a marine mammal scientist who works for the US-based Animal Welfare Institute, said the dolphin showed signs of stereotypes – the repetition of an action, often in zoo animals, with no apparent purpose.

She said The Straits Times: & # 39; This kind of repetitive, pointless, even self-damaging behavior is the essence of stereotypes. It is a sign of boredom, neurosis, depression.

& # 39; It's hard to say exactly what's going on here, but it's definitely a sign of poor emotional health. & # 39;

The video has been viewed more than 240,000 times and has nearly 2,000 shares since Empty The Tanks posted it on Facebook on Sunday.

In addition to the video, a caption claimed that it was taken at the resort and that the & # 39; disturbing behavior & # 39; mentioned a number of reasons why & # 39; dolphins don't belong in captivity & # 39 ;.

Rachel Carbary, founder of Empty The Tanks calling for an end to the captivity of dolphins and whales, said the animal & # 39; disturbing & # 39; behaved.

She told the Times: & # 39; During his visit, he witnessed the disturbing dolphin behavior in the video and chose to record it.

& # 39; We shared this video on social media in the hope of paying more attention to the fate of these conscious animals that are still suffering in captivity. & # 39;

Resorts World Sentosa (RWS) would not confirm that the recordings were made in the aquarium

Resorts World Sentosa (RWS) would not confirm that the recordings were made in the aquarium

An RWS spokesperson claimed that it was not unusual for dolphins to behave in this way when they & # 39; curious & # 39; were to their environment

An RWS spokesperson claimed that it was not unusual for dolphins to behave in this way when they & # 39; curious & # 39; were to their environment

Resorts World Sentosa (RWS) would not confirm that the recordings were made in the aquarium, but a spokesperson claimed that it was not unusual for dolphins to act like this out of & # 39; curiosity & # 39;

Dr. Chua Tze Hoong, Group Director of Animal and Veterinary Service (AVS) at the National Parks Board in Singapore, said his veterinarians visited the RWS dolphin enclosure on Thursday and no & # 39; abnormal & # 39; have seen behavior during the visit, according to local media reports.

RWS said the behavior was not unusual for dolphins and was only due to the & # 39; curiosity & # 39; from the animal to people and its environment.

The aquarium said in a statement Coconuts Singapore: & # 39; We are not sure about the source of the video, but we can share some natural behavioral characteristics of dolphins.

& # 39; Dolphins have a natural curiosity about people and their environment. They are also very social and like to play with other dolphins, & the statement said.

& # 39; As part of their natural behavior, they communicate with each other via echolocation, make high clicks and other playful actions, such as spurring objects with their rostrums to attract attention. & # 39;

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