Dogs can not kiss and make up because they have lost the package mentality and # 039;

The researchers observed the pattern of reconciliation in four packets of captive wolves and compared them to rescue dogs in a shelter. The wolves were violent with each one and fell almost once every hour. However, they compensated in ten minutes almost half of the time.

Why dogs can not kiss and put on makeup: researchers discover that they have lost the "herd mentality" of the wolves and simply avoid others after a disagreement

  • The team studied how dogs and wolves reconcile after a disagreement
  • The wolves were violent to each other, but quickly reconciled
  • Dogs are less likely to fight, but simply avoid each other instead of reconciling

Dogs find it much more difficult for wolves to forgive their friends, it has been revealed.

Researchers believe that domestication has meant that dogs have lost their "herd mentality".

The team at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna studied how dogs and wolves are reconciled with others of the same species after a disagreement.

Scroll down to watch the video

The researchers observed the pattern of reconciliation in four packets of captive wolves and compared them to rescue dogs in a shelter. The wolves were violent with each one and fell almost once every hour. However, they compensated in ten minutes almost half of the time.

The researchers observed the pattern of reconciliation in four packets of captive wolves and compared them to rescue dogs in a shelter. The wolves were violent with each one and fell almost once every hour. However, they compensated in ten minutes almost half of the time.

This is a key skill for the wolfpacks, they said.

"It is expected that highly cooperative social species participate in the frequent reconciliation after conflicts in order to maintain the cohesion of the package and preserve future cooperation," they wrote in the Royal Society Open Science journal.

The researchers observed the pattern of reconciliation in four packets of captive wolves and compared them to rescue dogs in a shelter.

The wolves were violent to each other, and fell almost once per hour.

However, they compensated in ten minutes almost half of the time.

The team at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna studied how dogs and wolves are reconciled with others of the same species after a disagreement, and discovered that dogs find it much more difficult for wolves to forgive their friends.

The team at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna studied how dogs and wolves are reconciled with others of the same species after a disagreement, and discovered that dogs find it much more difficult for wolves to forgive their friends.

The team at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna studied how dogs and wolves are reconciled with others of the same species after a disagreement, and discovered that dogs find it much more difficult for wolves to forgive their friends.

In dogs, they came into conflict less frequently, but when they did, the results were violent and less likely to be resolved.

They found that less than one in five fights results in quick reconciliation.

"We provide evidence for reconciliation in captive wolves, which rely heavily on cooperation among group members, while domestic dogs, which depend less on wolves of specific cooperation, avoid interacting with their partners after conflicts" .

"Our results are in line with previous findings on several batches of wolves that live in different social and ecological conditions, suggesting that reconciliation is an important strategy to maintain functional relationships and package cohesion," the researchers concluded.

They say that the occurrence of reconciliation in dogs can be influenced by social and environmental conditions more than in wolves & # 39; and asked for more research on how dogs face conflict.

HOW DOGS HAVE BEEN DOMESTICATED?

A genetic analysis of the remains of the oldest dogs in the world revealed that dogs were domesticated in a single event by humans living in Eurasia, some 20,000 to 40,000 years ago.

Dr. Krishna Veeramah, an assistant professor of evolution at Stony Brook University, told MailOnline: "The process of dog domestication would have been a very complex process, involving several generations in which the characteristic features of the dog evolved gradually.

"The current hypothesis is that domestication of dogs probably emerged passively, with a population of wolves somewhere in the world that live on the outskirts of hunter-gatherer camps feeding on human-made waste.

"Those wolves that were more docile and less aggressive would have had more success in this, and although humans initially did not get any kind of benefit from this process, over time they would have developed some kind of symbiotic [mutually beneficial] relationship with these animals, evolving into the dogs we see today & # 39;

Ad

http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js(function() {
var _fbq = window._fbq || (window._fbq = []);
if (!_fbq.loaded) {
var fbds = document.createElement(‘script’);
fbds.async = true;
fbds.src = “http://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbds.js”;
var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
s.parentNode.insertBefore(fbds, s);
_fbq.loaded = true;
}
_fbq.push([‘addPixelId’, ‘1401367413466420’]);
})();
window._fbq = window._fbq || [];
window._fbq.push([“track”, “PixelInitialized”, {}]);
.