Dog is rescued from the Cambodian slaughterhouse

Activist Michael Chor traveled from Thailand to Cambodia to save Noise mestizo (pictured)

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT

A pet dog snatched to settle a family debt was rescued from a Cambodian slaughterhouse just before it was cut to eat.

The slaughterhouse owner took mongrel Noun after his owner borrowed £ 2,600 to pay gambling debts.

Noun's family contacted animal activist Michael Chor, who runs the charity The Sounds of Animals, to help save Noun before she was killed and eaten.

He traveled from Thailand to Cambodia and found Noun chained to a fence and tied inside a plastic bag at the slaughterhouse.

Chor was able to raise the cash needed to free Noun, whose name means "sitting in the sun" in just 24 hours after his followers made donations.

Activist Michael Chor traveled from Thailand to Cambodia to save Noise mestizo (pictured)

Activist Michael Chor traveled from Thailand to Cambodia to save Noise mestizo (pictured)

But Mr. Chor returned to the market hours later to find that hundreds of dogs in which Noun had been caged had been killed, a chilling proof of the fate of the one who escaped.

He captured spooky videos and images that show the remains of the skinned, slaughtered and boiled animals that are sold to customers.

But Noun has now fully recovered and will be adopted somewhere away from Cambodia.

Chor, a former doctor, said: "Noun was a family pet and the children of the family loved her very much," said Chor, who is from France but now lives in Thailand.

"She had lived with the family all her life and when we had Noun we called them to let them know that she was safe.

"The children were crying with joy, because their beloved pet had not been killed."

He added: "The slaughterhouse was dirty, it was covered in body parts of dogs all over the floor, there were staff cutting dogs, boiling dogs and their bodies being thrown to the floor.

Noun's family contacted animal activist Michael Chor, who runs the charity The Sounds of Animals, to help save Noun before she was killed and eaten.

Noun's family contacted animal activist Michael Chor, who runs the charity The Sounds of Animals, to help save Noun before she was killed and eaten.

Noun's family contacted animal activist Michael Chor, who runs the charity The Sounds of Animals, to help save Noun before she was killed and eaten.

Noun's rescuers found her tied in a bag with only her head outside so she could breathe

Noun's rescuers found her tied in a bag with only her head outside so she could breathe

Noun's rescuers found her tied in a bag with only her head outside so she could breathe

"They killed and processed hundreds of dogs per day and the live dogs remained in a cage in the back of the slaughterhouse, awaiting their destination."

– It smelled to death. It was worse than hell.

Noun's rescuers found her tied in a plastic bag with only her head out so she could breathe.

She was malnourished and dehydrated after being tied to a wall by her leash for a week and left surrounded by the body parts of other dead dogs.

His teeth had also been broken, a common practice to prevent him from biting any of the slaughterhouse workers.

They were given vitamins, calcium and antibiotics for an infection and they will also be microchipped and given all the necessary injections.

Chor said his goal is to close the exchange, but for now, he must be careful and accept that it is a deeply rooted tradition. In the photo, the slaughterhouse

Chor said his goal is to close the exchange, but for now, he must be careful and accept that it is a deeply rooted tradition. In the photo, the slaughterhouse

Chor said his goal is to close the exchange, but for now, he must be careful and accept that it is a deeply rooted tradition. In the photo, the slaughterhouse

Then it will cross the border into Thailand, where it will be served at the Blue Dream Shelter, managed by the Sound of Animals, before being relocated to the United Kingdom or the United States.

Mr. Chor added: "When I pulled Noun out of the bad, she froze in fear.

"I still had my neck and strap on, the strap was used to tie it to the wall, so I could not move at all, my teeth were broken and I could not bite anyone.

"They opened the vet especially to take Noun and he was given pain relief.

& # 39; She will stay with the veterinarian in Cambodia for a week and she will be given all the necessary care. Hopefully, he will have a home forever. "

Despite being traumatized by the discovery of other disemboweled animals when he returned to the market, Chor said he was forced to remain calm because the market is run by dangerous criminals.

The activist moved to Asia to join the fight against the dog meat trade in 2005.

While the dog meat industry attracted global attention in China, it is less known in Cambodia

While the dog meat industry attracted global attention in China, it is less known in Cambodia

While the dog meat industry attracted global attention in China, it is less known in Cambodia

While the industry attracted global attention in China, it is less known in Cambodia, even though it is legal to sacrifice dogs and sell their meat in the country.

Chor said his goal is to close the exchange, but for now, he must be careful and accept that it is a deeply rooted tradition.

But his work has had a high cost since he says he has developed PTSD caused by the suffering he has seen at the hands of the butchers.

Chor, who said that up to 400 dogs were killed in the market every day, said: "I tried to come back to see what had happened to the dogs that were alive in the morning.

"It's a feeling that you can not explain, I could not sleep for days." But you can not get nervous and start a fight, because these people are dangerous.

& # 39; This is a very dangerous place, it is run by the local mafia. I had to try to negotiate to get them for free instead of buying the dogs, which would finance the market.

"They call me 'the crazy Frenchman' around here, I think I've developed post-traumatic stress disorder from what I've seen, it's impossible for me not to feel anything.

"Things are improving and there are more and more dogs that are saved and become aware, but there is a long way to go."

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