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Dodo, ‘Italian hand’ and ninja: Check out a first look at the new emoji set for iOS later this year

In honor of World Emoji Day, Emojipedia has released the first official look at some icons that will be released this year.

The gallery includes the extinct dodo bird, ninja with a sword and the long-awaited ‘Italian hand’ or pinched fingers.

The ‘version 13.0’ list will also include n nest dolls, piñata, tamale, boomerang, mint, anatomical heart, beaver, transgender symbol, bubble tea and lungs.

There are others that have been approved but no previews have been given, such as a smiling face with a tear, a disguised face and hugging people.

The gallery includes the extinct dodo bird, ninja with a sword and the long-awaited 'Italian hand' or pinched fingers. The 'version 13.0' list will also include n nest dolls, piñata, tamale, boomerang, mint, anatomical heart, beaver, transgender symbol, bubble tea and lungs

The gallery includes the extinct dodo bird, ninja with a sword and the long-awaited ‘Italian hand’ or pinched fingers. The ‘version 13.0’ list will also include n nest dolls, piñata, tamale, boomerang, mint, anatomical heart, beaver, transgender symbol, bubble tea and lungs

World Emoji Day is an unofficial holiday celebrated since July 17 since 2014, and Apple has used the day to announce upcoming iOS emojis.

One of the most talked about emojis of the year is the so-called ‘Italian hand’, which is actually the pinched hand.

According to Emojipedia, it is described as’ an emoji in which all fingers and thumb are held together vertically, also known as the Italian hand gesture ‘ma che vuoi’.

For the first time, a transgender symbol has also been included, namely ‘man with stroke and male and female sign, which is accompanied by a transgender flag.

One of the most talked about emojis of the year is the so-called 'Italian hand', which is actually the pinched hand

One of the most talked about emojis of the year is the so-called 'Italian hand', which is actually the pinched hand

One of the most talked about emojis of the year is the so-called ‘Italian hand’, which is actually the pinched hand

Jeff Ingold, head of media engagement at LGBT campaign group Stonewall, said, “Taking action to make communications such as emojis more inclusive and diverse is always a welcome step.

“So we’re happy to have more gender neutral emojis and a trans flag emoji included.”

“Visibility is very important and companies can always think of more ways to promote trans equality.”

The transgender flag is made up of two horizontal lines, representing those born as boys, two pink lines for those born as girls, and a white line for those transitioning or genderless, said designer, trans-activist Monica Helms.

For the first time, a transgender symbol has also been included, namely 'man with stroke and male and female sign, which is accompanied by a transgender flag

For the first time, a transgender symbol has also been included, namely 'man with stroke and male and female sign, which is accompanied by a transgender flag

For the first time, a transgender symbol has also been included, namely ‘man with stroke and male and female sign, which is accompanied by a transgender flag

Apple has also updated its Memoji options with different headgear and colored face masks during the coronavirus pandemic

Apple has also updated its Memoji options with different headgear and colored face masks during the coronavirus pandemic

Apple has also updated its Memoji options with different headgear and colored face masks during the coronavirus pandemic

In January, a total of 117 new characters and images were approved for the emoji library, as announced by Unicode Consortium.

However, today’s reveal reveals the images as they appear to iOS users.

Apple has also updated its Memoji options with various headgear and colored face masks during the coronavirus pandemic.

The new options will not be available until the company’s next operating system, iOS 14 will be released later this year.

The tech giant rolled out Memoji in 2018, allowing users to create their own personalized characters that can be used in text and FaceTime.

Elite Daily reports that three are three new Memoji stickers: a blushing Memoji, a fist bump Memoji, and a cuddly Memoji.

As for headwear, there are options such as a durag, a tile, a cycling helmet, a nurse’s cap or a swimming cap.

Users also have the option to add a custom face mask to their digital self that can be pleated or seamed – and there are 16 colors available.

DO EMOJIS REDUCE THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE?

Emojis may be a fun form of communication, but they destroy the English language, according to a recent Google study.

Smiley faces, love hearts, thumbs up and other cartoon icons – instead of words – are the preferred method of communication by teenagers, who are considered the worst offenders in terms of grammar and punctuation decline.

More than a third of British adults believe that emojis are the reason for the worsening of the correct language, according to the survey commissioned by the Google site YouTube.

Emoji were first used by Japanese mobile phone companies in the late 1990s to express an emotion, concept or message in a simple, graphic way. Now Twitter feeds, text messages and Facebook messages are full of it

Emoji were first used by Japanese mobile phone companies in the late 1990s to express an emotion, concept or message in a simple, graphic way. Now Twitter feeds, text messages and Facebook messages are full of it

Emojis were first used by Japanese mobile phone companies in the late 1990s to express an emotion, concept or message in a simple, graphic way. Now Twitter feeds, text messages and Facebook messages are full of it

Of the 2,000 adults ages 16 to 65 who were asked their opinion, 94 percent believed English was in decline, with 80 percent citing youth as the worst offenders.

The most common mistakes British make are misspellings (21 percent), followed closely by apostrophe placement (16 percent) and comma abuse (16 percent).

More than half of British adults are not confident in their command of spelling and grammar, the study found.

In addition, about three-quarters of adults rely on emoji to communicate, in addition to a reliance on predictive text and spell checking.

The use of emojis is so pervasive in our culture that Oxford Dictionary’s ‘Word of the Year’ in 2015 was not a word at all – it was the Face With Tears emoji, which shows just how influential the small image images have become.

They were first used by Japanese cell phone companies in the late 1990s to express an emotion, concept or message in a simple, graphic way.

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